2 Saint Margaret Anglican Church: Latest News at St. Margaret

Latest News at St. Margaret




Twenty-Third Sunday after Trinity, November 19th, 2017

"For our citizenship is in Heaven;"  (Philippians 3:17 ff)

Whenever we go somewhere out of town such as on a day trip or we are travelling to another state, my wife is "amazed"  . . . . my choice of word, not hers . . . . at how fast we get there.  She says I drive fast.  I don't think I drive that fast.  Well, I try not to because:  A) I'm too scared of getting pulled over and getting a ticket; and B) I can't afford the ticket.  Let's just put it this way:  when I start driving I continue driving and driving and driving.  I keep my mind focused on our destination and I don't let anything get between me and where I'm going.  Well, of course there are things that always show you down no matter what:  slow-down's  due to construction . . . or a crash . . . or a stalled vehicle.  Then there are also detours that might slow you down as well.  And you always have to make allowances for bathroom breaks and getting something to eat while you are on the road.  But to the determined driver such as myself, these are only minor inconveniences on the road towards my destination.  Remember that song "Ain't No Mountain High Enough?"  I like the version by Diana Ross best, I think.  But the lyrics in this song demonstrate the determination in a human being to get to the destination:  "Ain't no mountain high enough .   . . . . Ain't no valley low enough    .. . . . . Ain't no river wide enough . . . to keep me from getting to you."   All of us are determined in something, aren't we?  Some of us are determined to get to our destination far away.  Some of us are determined to get promoted or to get another position where we work.  Some of us are determined to obtain a certain item that we would like to possess; whether that item be a new pair of sneakers or a new appliance or a new house.  We save and we work overtime and we cut corners so that we can earn the money to get what we want.  Again, all of us can think of something where we are determined to get something and we will not let anything or anyone get in our way.

In the Third Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians, St. Paul is reminding the young church who and what they truly are:  "For our citizenship is in Heaven."  In other words, your feet may be here on earth but you need to remember that your heart should be in Heaven.   Let me say that again just so it will sink in:  we need to remember that our heart should be in Heaven and NOT here on earth.  For so many people, their heart is anywhere BUT Heaven.  Their heart is in their possessions . . . their treasures . . . their riches.  Their heart is in their career or getting promotions or getting wealthier.  Their heart is in getting high or drunk.  "For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also."  (St. Matthew 6:21)  St. Paul is reminding all of us that our true citizenship is in Heaven and we should keep our mind focused accordingly.  Too many of us forget that fact because our minds get too occupied on the latest distraction that the world throws our way.  Do you ever notice that us human beings are never content?   We never seem to be happy . . . at least for very long.  We get focused on one thing and we work and work and work until we get whatever we were working on.  And we are satisfied for about .. . . . . oh, a minute or two . . . . and then our mind gets diverted to something else that grabs our attention for the time being.  St. Paul is saying to each one of us:  "Hey!  You are a citizen of Heaven!  You are a child of the Most High!  You already have a mansion waiting for you up above!  Why are you messing around with this nonsense down here?"  Let our prayer be today that we keep focused on who we are and what we are.  Let us not get our attention diverted from the fact that our true citizenship is in Heaven and keep our minds focused on that fact.


St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Come hear the Word of God preached from the King James Version and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Twenty-Second Sunday after Trinity, November 12, 2017

". . . . that your love may abound yet more and more in knowledge and in all judgment"
(Philippians 1:3 ff)

The Epistle to the Philippians has been called by some the "Epistle of Joy" because it is in this epistle that St. Paul makes the point that he does rejoice.  As such, he is asking the Philippians the question, "Do you rejoice?"  Being joyful is certainly a human emotion.  We are joyful just as we are sad.  We are happy just as we are angry.  Depending of course on our mood and circumstances, we can experience just about any mood.  For example, I may be anxious and joyful about going to Opening Day of the baseball season and then I find out the weather forecast calls for Storms all day.  As a result I am then disappointed and sad instead of happy and joyful.  Again, human beings have the potential to "love" all kinds of things, don't we?  We "love" food, for instance.  If you would ask me the question as to what kinds of food do you enjoy, more than likely I would respond:  "Oh, I just love fried chicken."  Or I might say that I love to eat German food.  Again, it is not limited to food as to what we "love."   If someone happens to mention a show out of the blue that you like and you jump in, "Oh, I just love that show!"  "I just love that move."  Human beings tend to "love" all kinds of things:  fads . . . . clothing . . . shoes. . . .  food . . . . Hollywood stars . . . . sports teams . . . . hobbies . . . .  We could go on and on.  We love what we are interested in.  We love what brings us joy and satisfaction.  We love the things that entertain us.  St. Paul is telling us though to remember that true love is realized in the things of God as opposed to the things in the world.  Yes, there are things in the world that do bring us joy.  There are things in the world that do satisfy us for a time.  But true love and true satisfaction only resides in our relationship with God.  As such our true joy and contentment will also be found in letting others know about our love for God.  Have you ever been to a wonderful restaurant and you were so pleased with the food, also with the service, perhaps even with the price of the meal.  And you just couldn't wait to tell somebody about your experience.  The same thing happens when you see a movie or a show that you truly enjoy.  You just can't wait to tell others about your experience:  "Hey, let me tell you about a great movie I saw last night .  . . ."   This is only natural for human beings:  to share their experience of life.  Thus, St Paul is telling us as he was telling the Philippians, Let your joy be shared among others.  Let others know why you are joyful.  Share with one another the joy that you have.  And of course our joy as Christians is our love for God Himself.   All the joys . . .  all the satisfactions that this world has to offer are only temporary.   The things we love in this world are not meant to be long-lasting:  either they will wear out . . .  or they will break . . .  or they will rust away . .  . but the love that God offers us is everlasting.   In this should we find our true love.  It is the love of God that we should find our real love in . . .  our real contentment . .  our real satisfaction.  So many of us find our satisfaction solely in the things of the world.  This is a mistake because we can not take the "things of the world" with us when we die.  The only thing that we can carry over to the next life is our love of God.  Let us use our time wisely in this world to develop a love for the things of God and not for the things of the world.


St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship God in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please feel free to join us as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father and listen to His Word.


Twenty-First Sunday after Trinity, November 5th, 2017

"Put on the whole armour of God"  (Ephesians 6:10 ff)

In this Sixth Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, we hear St. Paul finishing up his epistle (or his letter) to the church at Ephesus.  St. Paul is doing his best to encourage the young church to face the world and all the dangers the world offers.  Certainly, we in our own day and age need this encouragement as well.   If anything, the devil is working overtime to do what he can to try to secure his "kingdom" here on the earth.  He does that very simply by taking our attention away from God.   How can we focus on God and doing God's will when we are so busy focusing on the many diversions placed along our path:  riches . . .  money . . .  power . . . possessions (whether they be clothing, or expensive shoes, or electronics, or cars, etc.  . . . . . television . . . movies . . .  the internet . . . .  drugs . . . . alcohol . . .  The list of distractions that Satan places in our path seems to grow generation by generation.   He does everything he can to divert our attention away from God.  As a result, just as St. Paul was reminding the Ephesians, so too is he reminding us:  "Put on the whole armour of God!"

St. Paul is using the image of a soldier and as such he is describing everything the soldier either wears or possesses in order to help keep him safe.  St. Paul writes that we should put on this "armour of God, so that you may be able to stand against the devices of the devil."  Satan is certainly crafty, if nothing else.  Give credit where credit is due.  The devil has made his "devices" that keep us away from God to be so appealing, to be so enticing, we can not but run to them . . . to want them . . . to desire them.  And as such it becomes that much more difficult to resist them.  All the more reason, St. Paul writes, to put on the whole armour of God:  " . . .  take the armour of God that you may be able to stand against them in the evil day . . . ."  Soldiers wear what they wear to help protect them in battle.  Soldiers use weapons in battle to secure the upper hand, so to speak.   So, too, we are in a battle.  Make no mistake about it.  St. Paul used this imagery to remind the Ephesians just as we need to be reminded:  we are in a battle . . . . a spiritual battle.  And, as such, we need to be protected just as any soldier is in battle.  We need to "put on the whole armour of God" to help protect us as well as we fight Satan and his minions here on earth.

"Stand with truth as a belt about your waist."  Jesus Christ is the Truth!  Jesus came to earth to remind us of Our Heavenly Father and how He loves us.  Everything else is fading but God's love will never fade.  Never forget the truth that you possess!  "Put on righteousness as a breastplate."  So many of us in the world today leave ourselves "wide open" to attack by forgetting who we are first and foremost.  We go into the world on a daily basis forgetting that we are "Children of the Most High" and not acting as such.  We are more interested in "fitting in" with every one else by what we wear  . . . and how we talk . . . and how we act  . . .  and what we do.   We ought to be more interested in whether or not we are living by God's standards and not the world's standards.  "Have your feet shod with the readiness to preach the gospel of peace."  We should always be ready to preach.  Preaching the Glory of God not only with our mouth but preaching by the way we live our life.   Just as any preacher or teacher needs to know what he or she is going to say, so too we need to be ready to preach by being prepared.  This preparation requires study of God's Word and a knowledge of Him and what He wants for us in our life.  "Put on the helmet of Salvation."  Always be thankful for the many gifts that God has given you:  the gift of life . . . . the gift of health . . . the gift of having a roof over your head and food on your table.  God gives us many gifts throughout our lifetime.  But the one gift that God gives us that is greater than all of the others combined in the gift of Salvation!  God offers us a gift that is so great it can never be measured.  Always remember this gift.  Always treasure it.  And never take it for granted.

As we go into the world, there are many snares and traps waiting for us.  Let us always be stand ready.  Let us always be prepared.  Let us always use the "armour" that God has seen fit to supply us with.  Let us never go into battle unprepared for what faces us.


St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM to gather together as God's family so that we worship God in a traditional liturgy.  We use the King Jame Version of the Bible.  We also use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We listen to what God is saying to us and open our hearts to hear His Word.  And then we receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Twentieth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 29th, 2017

"So those servants went out into the highways, and gathered together all as many as they found, both bad and good:"  (St. Matthew 22:1 ff)

In the Twenty-Second Chapter of the Gospel of St. Matthew, Our Blessed Saviour is telling the story of the king who made a marriage-feast for his son.  Now, as the story goes, Our Lord says that the invited guests "made light" of the invitation and decided not to show up for a variety of reasons:   . . . . . "one to his farm, another to his merchandise . . . ."  Now the fact that none of the invited guests showed up once the feast was ready upset the king greatly.  As a result the king instructed his servants to bring guests to the feast, no matter who they were.  Our Lord continues the story as He relates the instructions of the king to his servants:  "Go ye therefore into the highways, and as many as ye shall find, bid to the marriage. So those servants went out into the highways, and gathered together all as many as they found, both bad and good: and the wedding was furnished with guests."  Now, there are a number of things we could say about this story but I would like to point out two important considerations:

1)  The first thing I would like to point out in this story is that the servants invited as many as they could  . . . . and Our Lord continues . . . . "both bad and good."  Why would Our Lord make the statement "both bad and good?"  Remember the main reason why Our Lord is telling this story to begin with is that He is comparing it to the Kingdom of God.  So, we should always remember that God has love for both the "bad and good."  Our Lord died on the Cross for both the "bad and good."  And Our Heavenly Father invites both the "bad and good" to be with Him in Heaven.   How often though do we not show love to those whom we deem to be "bad?"  How often in our life do we not reach out to certain people because we think of ourselves as "good" and them "bad?"  Our Lord came to this earth to tell everyone  . . . . both bad and good . . . about the Kingdom of God.  He came to instruct everyone in regards to His Heavenly Father.  He did not come to just save the "good."   He came for the "bad" as well.   If Our Blessed Saviour did not differentiate between who was "good" and who was "bad,"  why should we?

2)  The second consideration we should make point to remember is that the original invited guests did not show up because they were more concerned with other things.  Our Lord states that the original invited guests "made light of it, and went their ways, one to his farm, another to his merchandise . . .  "  How many of us in the world "make light" of God's invitation because we are too concerned with "things of the world."  How many of us are too distracted by things in the world to even pay attention to what God is calling us to?  The world offers so many distractions that catch our attention and divert us away from God.  We need to be always vigilant to stay focused on God and not on the things of the world.  This story should help remind us of the importance of this fact that we should stay focused on "things of above" and not on "things below."


Please join us on Sunday, October 29th, 2017 as we gather together to worship Our Blessed Saviour.  St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM to listen to the Word of God and to receive the Blessed Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us.


Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, October 22nd, 2017

". . . that yet henceforth walk not as other Gentiles walk" (Ephesians 4:17 ff)

Have you ever been to a restaurant that you have never been to before but you heard rave reviews about it?  Now these rave reviews could have been from critics on the local TV news program or it could have been a published review in the local newspaper or it could have been by word of mouth from your friends or coworkers.  And so you decide to go there simply because you have heard so many great things about the food.  And then once you go there for yourself you decide that it certainly didn't live up to the hype.  It was OK, you say to yourself, but it wasn't any different from any other restaurant.  This could be said of a TV show or a movie as well for that matter.  We read fantastic reviews and hear great things and then we go see it for ourselves and it just doesn't do anything for us.   It was OK, we tell ourselves but it just wasn't any different from the previous ten westerns we saw.  . . or the ten previous romances we saw .  . . . etc.  There are certain things that stand apart from all the rest.  Whether they be great sports teams or great restaurants . . .  . it could be great movies . . . . or great companies to work for . . . .. Even certain "days" will stand out from others.  Holidays such as Christmas or Thanksgiving stand out from the Monday of an ordinary work week, for example.   Your graduation day, . . . the day you were married . . . . Again, these are days that stand out from the rest.

We could go on and on but I think it's clear by now the point that I'm trying to make:  Certain things stand out . . . they are different . . . . they are not like the rest.  Christianity is like that.  Or it is supposed to be like that.  It should be different, St. Paul is writing to the Ephesians.  Now, St. Paul is focusing on the fact that once you become a Christian, you are a new person.  You are a changed person.  You are not as you were previously.  You are a new creature!   "Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature; old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new."  (II Corinthians 5:17)  When we have Christ in our life, we are new creatures!   It is not the "same old thing."   We view life differently.  We see people differently.  We do not see the world as we previously did.  We see the world now as Christ would have us view the world.   Now let me point out something very important before I go any further.  This is not to say that Christians consider themselves better than anyone else.  St. Paul was not saying that and neither am I.  Christ came to serve and He is calling us to do likewise.  This is certainly part of what sets us apart from the world.  While the rest of the world is focusing on what they can obtain:  power and riches that only the world can offer.  The Christian is focusing on how to do the will of God.   We are called as Christians to stand apart from the world . . .  to be different from the world . . . Christians live in the world, yes, but they are not of the world.  There is certainly a difference between the two:  "living in the world" and "being of the world."   This is why Christians are viewed as hypocrites by their critics when they see Christians acting one way in church and when they get outside of church, they are acting just like everybody else.   "And that ye put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness."  (Ephesians 4:24)  We are new.   God has made us new.  Through our baptism, God has washed away our sins.   He has made us a new creature.  We are new in Him!  So many people in the world are simply reflections of the world.  They want to be like everyone else by wearing the same thing . . . the same shoes . . . . the same jeans.  They want to think the same way as everyone else . . . do the same thing as everyone else.  As Christians, we want to do what Christ would do.   We want to reflect the love of God to the world  . . . . not reflect the world in our lives!  People should look at us and tell that we are different.  "Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them." (St. Matthew 7:20)

Join us on Sunday morning as we gather together to worship Our Blessed Saviour as family.  St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.   Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.

Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity, October 15th, 2017

"Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself." (St. Matthew 22:34 ff)

In this Twenty-Second chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, the Pharisees are listening once again to what Our Lord has to say.  Now, bear in mind that St. Matthew tells us first that the Pharisees had heard that Our Lord had put the Sadducees to silence.  Thus, the Pharisees more than likely took this as a challenge.  In other words,  "We can do much better than the Sadducees.  We will take care of this this one once and for all!"   St. Matthew continues on that one of the Pharisees was a lawyer and tempting Our Lord asked Him: "Master, which is the great commandment in the law?"  Now, this was an easy question for Our Lord to answer because every devout Jew would have been known how to answer this question.  This is because Our Blessed Saviour is quoting from Deuteronomy 6:5, which again every devout Jew would have known as the "Shema," which we could describe as the essential or most basic creed of Judaism.  And then Our Lord also quotes Leviticus 19:18 when He says:  "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself."  Keep in mind that by linking the two verses together He was making the point that we show love for God by the way in which we show love to others.  In other words, Our Lord would ask "How can you say that you love God up in Heaven if you can not even show love to those around you?"  It is a fair question, honestly.  How many times do we hear about tragedies or fights or situations where people are being cruel to others.  In recent memory, we are still questioning why so many people were killed in Las Vegas.  For that matter, why are so many people shot on the streets of Chicago?  Or New York?  Or Memphis?  Or any city that we can think of.  Why is there murder and crime and rape and theft and . . .  . ??????????  Why are there so many examples throughout the world of people hating one another?  If we look back to what Our Lord stated . . . specifically when He quoted Leviticus 19:18 . . . . the answer may be "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself."  The bottom line is that there is such lack of love in the world because there is a lack of love in regards to God.  Love for others will only increase when we begin to focus more on loving God and desiring to serve God.  Hatred of others . . . whether it results in murder . . . . or jealousy . . .  or theft . . . or gossiping . . . . When we show hatred towards others, it is because we have a lack of love for God.  We must always remind ourselves that we are made in the image of God.  Does this mean that God looks like us?  No, God is certainly not physical in that sense.  So when we speak about being made in the image of God, it is referring to the fact that God is love.  It is when we show love that we reflect the image of God within us.  When we hate others.  When we we are jealous of others.  When we despise others.  This means that we are not reflecting the love of God as we ought.   God calls us to show His face to the world around us.  We do this not only by what we say . .  . but also by how we act . . .  and how we show love to others around us.  Let us reflect the love of God to those around us.  Or should I say let each of us be a better reflection of God to those around us.  


St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us.

Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity, October 8th, 2017

"For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted"  (St. Luke 14:11)

In the Fourteenth chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear about the time that Our Blessed Saviour went to the home of one of the chief Pharisees.  In the very first verse of this chapter, St. Luke tells us that those there were watching Our Lord.  The fact that St. Luke points this out shows that the Pharisees were waiting and watching for Our Lord to do something or say something they could use against Him.  As He was there at the home, He cured a man with the dropsy.  Now, keep in mind "dropsy" is another name for edema, or swelling beneath the skin.  Now, seeing this man led Our Lord into a discussion about whether or not it would be permissible to heal on the Sabbath.  Our Lord tells the parable of the man who was invited to a wedding.  And when the man got there, Our Lord tells us,  the man just assumed that he was supposed to sit in the highest seat.  But Our Lord went on to say, much to the man's embarrassment and shame, that the "higher seat" was saved for someone more important and, as a result, the man had to remove himself from the seat of honor and go down to a less important place.   Our Lord's advice to those that we listening and to us as well was to not be so "full of ourselves" in regards to importance.  

In this age in which we live, each one of us should read this Fourteenth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel with great care.  For each one of us could learn from it if only we would heed Our Lord's advice.  In this age of social media, we run the risk of thinking that our opinion is the only opinion . . . . the only one that matters, that is.  We expect everyone else to not only listen to what we have to say, but we first assume that everyone else is interested in what we have to say to begin with.  Whether it be posting pictures of what we are eating or posting updates of where we are going.  In the world of social media, it does not take much effort to let the whole world know . . . . . at least the whole "cyber-world" . . . . .  know what we are doing; what we are eating; how we feel about any given subject; etc.  And God forbid, if we disagree with anything that we see.  We will sit right down and let that person know in no uncertain terms that we do not agree and how wrong the other person is.  

Now, bear in mind that I am not criticizing others around me because I post things on Facebook and Google and other such places, I post really important things like:   pictures of my dog . . . . pictures of what meal I am eating . . . . .  updating the status of where I am at currently . . . where I was . . . . where I am going to be . . .  I list my "likes" and my "dislikes" . .. . . . my favorite TV shows .  . .  movies . . . . . types of pasta that I enjoy eating . . . . . It goes on and on.   Now I realize that I am not the only one that does this because I see countless others in the Social Media world do the same exact thing.  The risk that I want to point out is that when dealing with Social Media, we are constantly dealing with "my world:"  the things I like; the things I don't like; the things I agree with; the things I don't agree with; what I'm doing; where I'm going; pictures of me; pictures of my food; pictures of my pets; pictures of . . . .  my . . .  . me . . . .  I . . . . .  In the world of social media, the emphasis is always on "me, myself, and I."  In the world of Social Media, in my humble opinion, we run the risk of getting an over-inflated ego of how important we are.  Yes, we are important but we have to keep in mind why we are important and keep things in perspective.   We are important because God thinks we are important.  Not because we ourselves think we are important.  We are important because God sent His Only-Begotten Son into the world to save us from our sins.  We are important because God saw fit to raise His Son from the dead so that in conquering death, we have hope.  Without Jesus, we would only have death in our future.  With Jesus, we have hope.  We are assured that Our Lord goes before us to prepare us a place . . . . to be with Him for eternity.   Yes, we are important . . . .  we are important to God.  Important enough that the Son of God carried the Cross and died on the Cross so that you and I would not have to . . . . even though it is us that deserve to be there.  Yes, I am important but not because of the pictures I post of my pet or my food or not even because of my opinions that I hold on countless topics.  I am not important based on the neighborhood where I live . . .  or where I work  . . .  . or what kind of clothes I wear or shoes I own . . . . .  . I am important because God loves me and I am important to Him.  We should always keep this important fact in mind and humble ourselves before God.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we join together as God's family and worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we come to the altar to be fed the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And, finally, please stay after Mass for some fellowship at our coffee hour.

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.


Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity, October 1st, 2017


" For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ" (Ephesians 3:13)

I avoid watching the news on TV as much as possible.  But it has been virtually impossible to avoid seeing and hearing about the so-called "Anthem" protests that have sprung up around the NFL and other sports as well.  It is everywhere you look . . . .  the news on TV . . . . newspaper articles . . .  . Sports Illustrated cover stories . . . . social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter, etc.   Everybody, and I do mean everybody, has an opinion about what is going on with specific players and/or teams kneeling down while the National Anthem is playing.  Now, in essence there is no need to re-hash all the details because we all know what is happening.  It does seem to me to be a good time to focus on the Third Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians.  In this chapter, St. Paul is attempting to help the Ephesians understand . . . . or should I say, "appreciate"  . . . . . what God has done, the miracles He has performed, the graces that He has given and bestowed, the mysteries that He has revealed.  St. Paul is writing to show that the gift of salvation that was first offered to the people of Israel is now extended to us Gentiles as well.  And as such, St. Paul writes in verse 14:  "For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of Our Lord Jesus Christ . . . "  To me, St. Paul is correct.  In my opinion, this is what every Christian should focus on at this time.  It is God Who deserves our humble adoration.  It is Our Blessed Saviour to Whom we should "take a knee."  Elsewhere, we read:  "For it is written, As I live, saith the Lord, every knee shall bow to Me, and every tongue shall confess to God." (Romans 14:11).   Our Heavenly Father is the One to Whom we owe everything.  He is the One that we should kneel down in adoration before.

  Philippians 2:10-11 says it perfectly:  "That at the Name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father."  It seems to me that there are a whole host of ways to protest things you don't agree with:   marching peacefully, .  . . . signing a petition, . . . . voting and/or running for political office yourself . . . . boycotting specific businesses or not buying certain products . . . .  etc, etc, etc.  One of the beautiful things about our nation is that we are free to make statements.  All of us have an opinion.  My opinion may not match up with your opinion but that doesn't mean my opinion is better than yours.  We are free to disagree.  We are free to stand up and let our voice be heard.  You and I have a right to peacefully protest what we do not agree with.  That much is a given.  But that being said, "taking a knee" during the National Anthem is not a proper way to protest, in my very humble opinion.  If we "take a knee," it should be for the right reason.  As a Christian, if we "take a knee," it should be done to glorify and acknowledge the glory and majesty of Our Blessed Saviour.  If we "take a knee," it should be in honor of Our Heavenly Father, Who created Heaven and earth.  If we "take a knee," it should be done in humble adoration and thanksgiving at the foot of the Cross on which the Saviour of the world laid down His life to pay our debt . . .  not His, but ours.  And, finally, if we "take a knee," we should bow down in humble adoration and pray for ourselves and pray for our country.  Pray for forgiveness in the ways we have failed, for the ways in which we have made mistakes.  But also pray in thanksgiving that God has blessed us so abundantly as a nation.  To me, these are the reasons we should "take a knee" . . . .  to honor God and to pray to Our Heavenly Father, Who has blessed us and continues to bless us despite our failings.

Mass is celebrated in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we hear the Word of God preached from the King James Version of the Bible.  Listen to the Word of God speaking to you.   Spend time as God's family in solemn worship of God, taking time out of the busy schedule of life and devoting one hour to God.  And receive Our Blessed Lord in His Precious Body and Blood to help sustain us and nourish us for the journey called life. Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity, September 24, 2017

"Ye cannot serve God and mammon." (St. Matthew 6:24)

In the Sixth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour giving what has come to be known as His "Sermon on the Mount."  Now, bear in mind that this sermon begins back at the beginning of Chapter Five in St. Matthew's Gospel and it finishes up at the end of Chapter Seven.  So the passage that we are dealing with is somewhere near the middle, give or take.  If you look through chapters Five through Seven in this Gospel, you will be able to see for yourself a wide arrange of subjects/topics that Our Blessed Saviour talks about.  But in the passage that we are covering today deals with a very important topic.  I say "very important" because it is one that certainly still has bearing to our generation some two-thousand years later.  

In Verse 24 of this Sixth Chapter, Our Lord states:  "No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other.  Ye cannot serve God and mammon."  

As devout Christians, we are called to place God first and foremost in our life.  I am sure that every single one of you that is reading this would agree with that statement.  God should hold the utmost place in our life.  Period.  And yet as human beings we know that we are ruled very often by, how shall I put it, "base desires of the flesh," if you will.  In other words, people want to satisfy their desires at THAT particular moment.  For example, if I am hungry my stomach will rule my actions until I fill that hunger.  If I get focused on buying a new pair of shoes, for example, I will plan out when I can go to the mall and look for that particular pair of shoes that I want to buy.  If the shoes are expensive, I may have to wait until I save up the money . . . . work overtime . . .  until I get enough to buy the shoes.   How about the alcoholic man or woman that "lives for the next drink?"  And yet so many of us . . . myself included . . . . "live" for the next gadget or doo-dad or meal or pair of sneakers, etc, etc, etc.  We can all come up with our own examples of "what we live for."  

We focus our efforts, . . . we focus our time . . . . we focus our energies into obtaining things of the world.  Again, in this same "Sermon on the Mount," Our Lord states:  "Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal:" (St. Matthew 6:20)

Our Lord states the obvious.  How many "treasures" do we own . . . how many "treasures" have we placed so much of our time and effort into acquiring? . . . . how many of these "treasures" are now "out of style," "out of date," "broken," "last years model," "rusted away"     Whether it be clothing that has gone "out of style" or technology that has been "outdated."  So much of our time and effort and energy is spent on things of this world that does not last.  

Our Lord continues in Verse Twenty-One:  "For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also."  (St. Matthew 6:21)  So many of us in the world have our "treasure" here below.  As Christians, our true "treasure" should be up above and not down below.   God calls us to a mansion up above where we will spend eternity.  We should spend our time preparing for that mansion that we are called to.   Let us spend our time focusing our attentions on "things above" and less time focusing on "things below."  Our Blessed Saviour assures us that we will always be taken care of by Our Heavenly Father.  Let us do our part, yes . . . let us work as we are called to do . . . .but let us focus on living for God and placing our trust in Him.  And let us always remember where our true treasure is . . . .up above and not below.

St. Margaret Church gathers together every Sunday morning for Mass at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Please join us as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.


Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, September 17th, 2017

I believe that I am a calm, laid-back person . . . .  for the most part, that is.  There really is not too much that "gets under my skin," I have to admit.  But one of the things that really "pushes my buttons," I have to admit, is rude people.  Is it me or are there less and less manners being put into practice by people?  I enjoy going to a store that sells used cd's and movies.  Well, they used to sell cd's.  I don't think they even sell those anymore.  Well, I enjoy going to this store to see if they have any movies that I would enjoy watching.  Since the aisles are rather narrow, you have to pass in front of people in order to go down the aisle.  Now, this is not the problem.  Since the aisles are narrow, this is understandable.  What is not understandable, though, are the complete lack of manners and total disrespect exhibited by a good percentage of people today.  People will walk right in front of you and never say "Excuse me" or "Sorry" or "Pardon me."    Hold a door open for someone today and see if you get a "Thank you" in return for your efforts.  My parents taught me manners while I was growing up.  They taught me to always say "Yes, Ma'am" or "Yes, Sir" when addressing others.  They taught me to say "Please" and "Thank You."  They taught me the art of something we used to call "common courtesy."  You see, common courtesy is something that  . . . . .  no matter your station in life . . . .  whether you are a president of a company or a cook or a janitor . . . .  whoever you are, whatever you are . . .   being respectful and courteous is something that everyone is capable of if they would just put the effort into it.   I am so grateful that my parents taught me to be courteous and respectful.  It is a skill that I have tried to put into practice my whole life.  Sadly, judging from others around me, it seems that this is a "dying art."  Is it a matter that people were never "taught" manners or is it that they were taught, yes, but they just choose not to be respectful?  It's hard to say.  

In the Seventeenth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear about Our Blessed Saviour passing through Samaria and Galilee as He went to Jerusalem.   And as He went, St. Luke tells us, He met ten lepers who begged for healing.  They yelled, "Jesus, Master, have mercy on us!"  Our Lord heard their request and gave them the direction to go show themselves to the priest.  As they went, they were miraculously healed .  . . . all ten of them.  The curious thing of this is that out of all of the ten that were cured . . . . only one of the lepers turned back to thank Our Blessed Saviour.  Only one man who was cured returned to give praise and thanksgiving.  Only one man came back to acknowledge the amazing thing that Our Lord just did for him.  Now in this story it is easy to find fault with the other "nine" who were not courteous enough to turn around and show thanksgiving to Our Blessed Saviour.  But how often do we show thanks to God for all the blessings He shows to us on a daily basis?   Do we thank God for blessing us?  Do we go to God daily in prayer to thank Him for the life He has given us?  The blessings He has bestowed on us?  How often do we thank God for the wonderful things He does for us?  Our Blessed Saviour was impressed with the Samaritan who turned around and gave thanks to Him for the healing he had received.  Let us pray that Our Blessed Saviour will be impressed with us as well when we thank Him for all the blessings He has bestowed on us.

St. Margaret Church gathers together every Sunday morning to listen to the Word of God, found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we listen to God speak to each one of us.  Set aside one hour of your busy week and dedicate this time to God.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time to strengthen and nourish you.  

We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Come join us and use this time to thank God for the many blessings He has shown you.


Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, September 3rd, 2017

In my secular position working for the Department of Corrections, I am a counselor for a faith and character based unit in a maximum security juvenile facility.  Now, bear in mind that we do not call it a "prison."  We refer to it as a "facility."  But I ask the young men sometimes in my unit sometimes:  "What makes this a prison?" because it would lose something in the "translation" if I asked them: "What makes this a facility?"   Of course, I get the usual answers back in response:   Fences . . .  Gates . . .  Doors . . .  Locks . . .  Guards .  .  .  Barbed Wire . .  . .  All very good responses, to be sure.  But the reason I ask this particular question to my guys is not to state the obvious but, rather, to help them understand that we build our own prisons which do not need any of the above mentioned items.  In other words, we imprison ourselves.  We imprison ourselves, for example, by the poor choices we make in life.  We imprison ourselves by the poor choices we make for friends who influence us.  We imprison ourselves by the drugs and the alcohol and the riches of the world that we become addicted to.  We are imprisoned by the poisonous mind-set that we have been taught to look at certain people a certain way.  Who needs fences and barbed wire and locked doors when we keep our own selves down through fear of moving forward.  Through fear of the unknown.  Through fear of being mocked and discouraged by those around us.  As I often say to my guys:  "We are our own worst enemies."  We refuse to improve our lives because we still chained to our addictions that keep us down.  We refuse to move out of the prisons we have built for ourselves because we find them to be comfortable . . .  they're familiar  . . . .  they're ours  . . . . they belong to us.   We are too blind to see that we are imprisoned through bad choices, bad decisions, addictions and the consequences of our wrong ways of thinking.   Who needs gates and locks and fences when many of us carry our own "personal prisons" around with us wherever we go?

The answer is obvious.  The answer is obvious to those who believe.  The answer is right before our eyes if we would only open our eyes and make an effort to look for the answer.  So many of us, as we stated above, are content to be in our prisons.  So many of us, whether we realize it or not, want to remain in our prison.  We may say that we don't but we say otherwise by our actions.  But if we would make the effort to look for the way out of our prison, the answer would be closer than we ever imagined. The answer, of course, is Our Blessed Saviour.  In St. Mark 7:37, we hear the words of the deaf man cured by Our Blessed Saviour:  "He maketh both the deaf to hear, and the dumb to speak"  St. Mark tells us that this man's ears were opened and the string of his tongue was loosed.    Only God can heal our impediments.  Only God can cure what needs to be cured.  The sad thing is that so many in the world do not even realize they need a cure.  So many in the world do not realize that they are imprisoned through their addictions,  . . . their hatreds, . . .  their anger .  .  . , their worldly mindset.  But it is Our Blessed Saviour Who holds the key.  He is the One that can set us free.  He is our cure.  He is our salvation.  He is our everlasting hope.  Let us never depart from Him.  Let us always stay constant in our faithfulness to Him.

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, September 3rd, 2017 as we celebrate the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.  Join St. Margaret Church this day as we pray for those affected by the hurricane in Texas and Louisiana.  As we pray for those affected by the storm we will listen to the Word of God and hear God speaking to us.  Holy Communion will be distributed so that we can be nourished and strengthened by the Body and Blood of Our Precious Saviour.

St. Margaret Church gathers every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Ninth Sunday After Trinity, August 13, 2017


The Gospel passage from the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Luke, which is appointed for the Ninth Sunday after Trinity,  provides one of the most powerful images in the entire Bible.  For the passage we hear read today has come to be known over time as the story of the  "Prodigal Son."  Certainly, Our Lord used this tale to describe how much God loves humanity.  And yet in this one story there is so much represented here:  the wickedness of the son; this son's recognition of his sins and wrongs against his father; the jealousy of the brother; etc.  And yet, despite this passage being referred to as the "Prodigal Son," I have always contended that the story would be more accurately called "The Loving Father."   As stated, there are multiple points in this story that we can choose to focus on, yet it is the image of the loving father waiting for his sons' return, . .  . . hoping for his son to come home, . . . . praying for his son to come back .  . ..  .. and then finally seeing his son from a great distance and running to his son . . . . without a doubt, that is the most powerful image in all of Scripture.  For it shows the love of a father that never gives up hope.  It shows the determination of a father to still see his son,  . . . .  no matter what wrong the son has committed . . . . , it shows the love that a father has for his son despite everything else.  It represents the love that God has for fallen humanity.  

When the son returned to his senses, he made the decision to return to his father acknowledging that he had done wrong.  He had his speech already planned out in his head before he went to his father.  He finished his speech by describing himself:  " . . . . . and am no more worthy to be called thy son"  He knew deep down inside that he had done wrong.  This is why Our Lord stated when telling the story that this young man had "come to his senses."  He knew that he did wrong.  He knew that he messed up big time.  He knew that what he did was an offense against his father in how the son acted.  And for all this, he no longer felt worthy to be called 'son.'  And yet despite everything that this son did, his father treated him like royalty upon his return.  He called for shoes to be placed on his feet and rings to be placed on his sons finger.   The father called for a great feast in celebration.  He did all of this for he loved his son.  He was pleased to see the son's return.  The reason that Our Blessed Lord chose to tell this story is certainly to show the celebration that God, Our Heavenly Father, has when we return to Him.  When we, just like the Prodigal Son, come to our senses and realize that our sinfulness will not lead us anywhere.  When we come to our senses and acknowledge that we have done wrong.  When we come to our senses and realize that we are not worthy to be called a Christian.  It is then that God shows His love for us and welcomes us home.  We are worthy because we are loved.  Loved by Our Heavenly Father that loved us so much that He sent His only Son into the world to die for our sins.  God, just like the father in this story, waits patiently for us as well to return.  He waits for us to come to our senses and make our return to Him.  But only we can do that.  God does not force our return.  We have to make the decision to come back to Him.  


St. Margaret Church gathers every Sunday morning to hear the Word of God and to worship Our Heavenly Father.  We are a traditional church.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us and dedicate an hour of your week to God.  Return home to Him, the God Who waits patiently for your return.


Transfiguration, Sunday, August 6, 2017

We read in the Ninth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke the story of the Transfiguration of Our Blessed Saviour.  In this Ninth Chapter, we hear that St Peter; St John; and St James accompanied Our Lord to pray.  Now, bear in mind as we read of this account that a marvelous event is about to unfold:  Our Lord will not only be transfigured as "His countenance was altered," (v. 29) but also that Moses and Elias will appear alongside Our Lord.   Now, imagine if you will, all of this happening in front of YOUR eyes.  How would you react?  What would you do?  What would be your reaction to all of this have been?  Well, in Verse 32, we hear what happened to St Peter, St James and St John:  "But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep: and when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with Him." (St. Luke 9:32)  " .  . .  THEY WERE HEAVY WITH SLEEP  . . . ."  Really?  Heavy with sleep?  Seriously?  I mean, come on, how can this be?  Here you are, you find yourself with the Second Person of the Holy Trinity.  You are in His Presence where not only He is transfigured:  His "countenance was altered" and "His raiment was white and glistening."  If this wasn't enough, Moses and Elias appear alongside of Him.  And St Peter and the boys fall asleep?  Seriously?!?!?!   It wasn't until they awoke from their sleep that, as St. Luke tells us:  " . . . . and when they were awake, they saw his glory .  . . . ."   You know, it is so easy to be a "back-seat driver," isn't it?  It is really easy to make "commentary" about others when it is not us walking in their shoes.  As St. Luke tells us it was not UNTIL they awoke that they were able to see the glory of the Lord.  That's really how it is with us as well, quite frankly.  Have you ever told someone or has anyone ever told you in the course of a conversation:  "Wake up!"  "Why don't you wake up?!?"  "Wake up and smell the coffee!"  When someone says something along these lines, what they're really saying is "Wake up to reality."  "Come back to reality."  Well, for Peter, James and John, it wasn't until they woke up that they were able to truly see the glory of the Lord.  We, too, like them need to "wake up" out of our sleep in order to see the glory of the Lord.  So many of us are lost in a deep sleep as well.  We are sleeping and dreaming about the things of the world:  money, and nice clothes, and food, and drink, and power, and possessions.   We day-dream about these things and more and focus our lives around them.  But until we wake up from our sleep . .. . Until we wake up from our dreams of worldly things we lust after . . . . until we awaken, it will be then that we will be able to fully appreciate the majesty of Our Blessed Saviour and see Him in His full glory.  We can not see His Glory because we are so busy looking at the things of the world.  Have you ever seen something in the corner of your eye but you didn't see it fully because you really looking at something else?  Or have you ever "heard" something but you really didn't hear it fully because you were focused on something else?  It's like that for me when, for example, I try to hear the weather forecast on the radio as I get ready in the morning.  I might turn on the radio for the specific intent to hear what the weather will be like that day.  But if I get busy doing this, that and the other, . .. .  . even though the radio is playing . . . .  I might get busy doing other things and totally miss the weather forecast.  And then I have to wait all over again and focus and make a point to listen ten minutes later when the forecast is given again.  It isn't until I focus and make a point to listen to the weather forecast, that will be when I hear it.  Otherwise, I usually get sidetracked by other things that I am doing at the time.  Quite frankly, that is how it is for us when it comes to things of God.  We have good intentions.  We want to be good.  We want to listen to God.  We want to do what God would have us do.  But we get sidetracked.  Our attention gets diverted.  We end up focusing on something else.  Let us be like St Peter and St James and St John.  Let us wake out of our sleep so that we can see the glory of the Lord.  Let us always focus on Our Blessed Saviour so that we can appreciate His glory and His majesty.

Join us at St. Margaret Church on Sunday, August 6th, 2017 as we celebrate the Feast of the Transfiguration.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Bible when we celebrate Mass.  We listen to the Word of God speaking to us.  We gather together as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Come join us.  Take one hour out of your week to focus on God . . . to give that hour solely to God.  Give that hour to God and dedicate it to Him and see what He will give you in return!  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Seventh Sunday after Trinity, July 30, 2017

In the Eighth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Mark, we hear about the feeding of the Four-Thousand.  Now Four-Thousand is indeed an impressive number.  But in those days, it would have been beyond "impressive."  Consider some two-thousand years ago, there would be no social media to make announcements . . . . lack of transportation (at least compared to how "easy" we have it now . . . . just jump in your car and "go!")   . . . .  no television commercials announcing a gathering, etc.  These Four-Thousand people gathered by hearing others talking about the "mysterious rabbi," the "wonderful teacher," the "miracle worker from Nazareth."  They heard about him by word of mouth, I am quite sure, and came for a multitude of reasons ranging from pure curiosity to faith to needing or wanting something from Our Lord.  Again, the vast crowd that had gathered was certainly impressive, but this is not what St. Mark was focusing on when he wrote this passage of his Gospel.  Nor was the size of the crowd what Our Lord was focusing on when He performed the miracle.  No, Our Lord was concerned about the well-being of those who had gathered to hear Him speak.  "My heart is moved with pity for the crowd, because they have stayed with me now for three days, and they have nothing to eat."  (St. Mark 8:2)  What a wonderful Saviour we have.   He had compassion on the crowd and was "moved with pity" because He was worried for them.  He was concerned for them.  He had their well-being in mind.  "My Sacred Heart is moved with pity!"  Our Blessed Saviour was not just concerned with their spiritual well-being  . . . .  He was concerned also with their physical well-being!   This shows the compassion that Our Lord had!

When Our Lord had determined that there was a need, a desperate need!   He called the disciples around Him and asked them what to do in this situation.  The first response back from the disciples was an objection:  "Where could anyone get bread to satisfy them in a desert place like this?," was their response.  (St. Mark 8:4)    Instead of focusing on the positive, the disciples focused on the negative.  Aren't we like that?  I know I am.  How often when something comes up that needs to be taken care of, how often is my first response:  "How am I going to do this?!?"  "I can't believe this!"  "I'm never going to be able to take care of this!"  This is what the disciples were, in essence, saying.  But Our Lord did not listen to their objections.  He immediately challenged them into action by asking how many loaves they had.  Very often we defeat ourselves because we look at the total amount needed and we get scared.  But more often than not the solution to a problem is to begin with a little bit and then move on from there.  The disciples responded that they had seven loaves and He was content to begin there.  From there it turned out, St. Mark tells us, that they also had a few small fishes as well.  We all know what happened next:  "So they ate until they were completely satisfied." (St. Mark 8:8)  "How many loaves have ye?"  "What do you have?"  "What can you spare?"  "What can you give?"  The words may be different but the meaning is the same.  The important thing really is the response we give.  What can you give?   Is our response negative?  "Oh, what can I do?  I don't have that much.  It won't make a difference.   Why should I even try?  Or is our response positive?  Well, I don't have very much but let's at least try.  You see, Our Lord doesn't expect riches from us but He does expect us to give 100% of what we do have.  This is why He was so impressed with the example of the widow who gave her two mites into the tithe.  Compared to most others, she had "nothing" to offer.  And yet she gave everything that she had.  What was seven loaves of bread compared to Four-Thousand hungry people.  What could seven loaves accomplish?  And yet Our Blessed Saviour takes we have and completes the rest.  Our Lord fills in what we lack.  The key is that we need to do our part.  We need to give our all.  We need to give 100% effort when it comes to God.  What do you have to give?  This is the question we should all ask ourselves today?  What do I have to give?  And am I willing to give it?  God doesn't expect us to solve all the problems of the world but He does want us to help.  He wants us to show some effort.  What will you give?

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we hear the Word of God found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Bible.  Come dedicate one hour of your week to God.  Step away from the busy-ness of the world for just one hour and focus totally on God.  Come and worship Him.  Let Him feed you spiritually.   Receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

Sixth Sunday after Trinity, July 23rd, 2017

" . . . . . even so we also should walk in newness of life"  (Epistle to the Romans 6:4)

In addition to my work as a parish priest, I work as a counselor for the Department of Corrections in a juvenile facility.  The unit that I administer is a "faith and character" based unit and I wear many hats, as they say.  On a daily basis I write reports, and do counseling sessions, attend classes with the students, answer questions, give commissary,  speak to family members, etc, etc, etc.  Every day brings new challenges.  Every day is an adventure, as I like to say.  One of the things that I am required to do is sometimes sit in on either family sessions or meetings held with representatives of outside agencies.  These meetings, more often than not, are held in the visiting room of the facility.  While I set there in the visiting room I can not help but notice a curious thing just outside the window.  Outside the visiting room is a small courtyard with one or two picnic tables.  Since this is a maximum security facility, it is enclosed by a ten foot chain link fence with strands of barbed wire attached to the top of the fence.  Now the curious thing I noticed is that there are two birds nests nestled inside of the barbed wire.  I will see birds on occasion fly in and out of the nests.  It seems that it would be a very precarious place, to say the least, for a birds nest to be built---in barbed wire.  But the birds don't seem to mind.  The reason I bring all of this up is because I found myself staring at a bird this week setting in the barbed wire on top of that fence, totally oblivious to the danger surrounding him.  He didn't seem to notice or if he did, he obviously did not care.  How many of us are in similar situations, so to speak, in our lives?  Just like that little bird was satisfied to sit on that barbed wire and didn't think anything of the danger, so too we are satisfied to exist in a world caught up in greed, and hatred, and jealousy, and envy.  We sit in a world consumed with desire of material things . . . . .  expensive clothing,  .   .  fancy cars . . . drugs . . . . drink . . . . .   We lust after the desire of power and wealth and fame.   Clothing styles certainly change over time.  Modes of transportation and communication change over the centuries.  But beyond that, man has been the same since the beginning of time.  And just like that little bird was totally oblivious to the dangerous "perch" it had inside of that barbed wire, so too are we totally oblivious to the dangers and snares that this old world offers.  But St. Paul reminds us that we have a "newness of life" as Christians.  We are called to see the world differently.  We are called to live in this world, yes,  but not to be of this world.  Through our baptism, we are new creatures.  Through Christ's dying on the Cross, we are forgiven our sins.  And through Christ's rising to new life, each one of us has the opportunity to spend eternity with Our Heavenly Father.  This is the "newness of life" that we are called to, as St. Paul puts it.  But, sadly, so many in the world are content to sit inside of the "barbed wire" that is the world, just like that little bird, and not think any differently of it.  We are so accustomed to the baseness of the world that we are content to exist in it.  But Christ calls us to a new life.  Christ calls us to be new creatures.  Let us spend our days following Our Blessed Saviour instead of the world.  Let us walk in the "newness of life" and not the same ol', same ol' that the world offers.

  St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located as 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship.


Fifth Sunday after Trinity, July 16th, 2017


" . . . but sanctify the Lord God in your hearts"  (I St. Peter 3:15)

If we look up they word "sanctify" in the dictionary, we will find definitions such as: "to make holy," "set apart as sacred," "to purify or free from sin."  There is one more definition of "sanctify" that I found:  "to entitle to reverence or respect."   It is actually this last definition that I would like to focus on for the time being.  "  . . . . to entitle to reverence or respect."  In the society in which we live how many objects . . . . things . . . . people . .. .  do we reverence or respect or love or adore?   Of course, I am speaking of the society in general but let's face it, how many "things" or "people" do we sanctify in our heart?  We spend time and energy focusing on the things that we love, don't we?  If you love a particular restaurant, it stands to reason that you will choose to go there when you go out to eat.   If you love a particular food, again, it stands to reason that you will choose that over something else when picking out something to eat.  We love celebrities in our country.  We follow the exploits of our favorite movie stars, our favorite television actors, our favorite musicians, our favorite sports stars ..  ..  . we follow their every move.  We enjoy seeing pictures of them, hearing gossip about them, reading about them.  In general, whether it be a favorite  movie star, sports star, food item,  movie, TV show, etc, etc, etc, don't we "sanctify" these things in our heart to a certain extent?  Now, don't get me wrong, I am not saying it is wrong to "love" pizza, or wrong to "love" watching baseball, or wrong to "love" eating at your favorite restaurant.  We all have our own likes and dislikes.  We all have our emotions as human beings.  We all have hobbies and things that each one of us enjoy.  What I am saying is that as a society we spend more time sanctifying "food" . . . . and "movie stars" . . . . and "sports celebrities" . . . . and "TV shows" . . . . and "rock stars" . . . . . and our "favorite possessions"  . . . . . we sanctify these things in our heart more than we sanctify God.   Again, going back to the definition of sanctify:  "to entitle to reverence or respect,"  we reverence and respect movie stars more than we reverence or respect God.  We reverence and respect popular singers more than we reverence or respect God.  We reverence and respect inanimate objects . . . . . .  clothes . . . . .  electronics . . . . expensive shoes . . . . . . cars  . . . . . possessions . . . . we reverence and respect these things in our heart more than we do Our Heavenly Father.  There is nothing wrong, again, with enjoying a good meal.  There is nothing wrong with enjoying your favorite TV show or movie.  There is nothing wrong with going to your favorite restaurant.  But when we begin to "respect" and "reverence" material possessions in our hearts before we respect and reverence God, this is where the problem lies.  "Home is where the heart is."  I am sure that we have all heard that old saying.  Our hearts are at home with the world more than they are at home with God, I am afraid.  "My heart is fixed, O God, my heart is fixed: I will sing and give praise." (Psalm 57:7)  We need to fix our hearts on God and not fix them on material possessions or celebrities or "things."  Again, in Psalm 108:1, it states:  "O God, my heart is fixed; I will sing and give praise, even with my glory."  As a society, we give our praise to everything but God, it seems.  We give glory to everything imaginable.  But it is God who gives us our glory.   It is God who makes all things possible.  It is to God that I owe my very existence.  It is God that I should sanctify in my heart . . . . reverence in my heart . . . . . enthrone in my heart.  As human beings we will focus our attention on the things that we love.  As Christians we need to focus on our love of God.  We need to sanctify God in our hearts.  We need to make Him the center of our attention.  We need to place the focus on Him and dedicate our life to Him.  So many of us waste our lives focusing on passing fads or celebrities or inanimate objects that brake, rust, or go out of style.   Let us spend more of that time dedicated to Our Heavenly Father, the only One worthy of our love, our time and our attention.  Let us sanctify God in our hearts.

Please join St. Margaret Church for Mass on Sunday, July 16th, 2017.  Join us as we take time out of our busy schedule and worship God as His family.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  We hear God speaking to us through His Precious Word.  We receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time so that we can be nourished and strengthened.

Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Fourth Sunday after Trinity, July 9th, 2017

"Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful . . . .  ." (St. Luke 6:36)  

In the Sixth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speak of difficult subjects such as:  "mercy;" and "forgiveness;" and "judging not;"  etc; etc; etc.  Now, when I say these are difficult concepts ..  . ..  trust me, I know from experience how difficult it is to "talk" about these concepts as opposed to, say, putting them into actual use.  It is difficult to show mercy and forgiveness to those who have done us wrong.  It is extremely difficult to forgive someone who, for all intents and purposes, does not even deserve our forgiveness.  But this whole business of "wronging others,"  . . . . and "doing the wrong thing,"  . .. .  and "hurting others by our actions" . . . .  .  none of these are a "new" concept,  they've been happening for a long, long time . . . .  . Well, since the beginning of mankind, basically.  Ever heard of Cain and Abel?  Human beings have been in the business of doing wrong to those around us for a long, long, long, long time.  Human beings have been hurting one another since  . .  ..  . well, . . . . .  since forever.   But if you continue reading through this passage of St. Luke, you'll find that Our Lord hit the proverbial nail right on the head because he gives the example of finding a "mote" in our brothers eye while all the time we have a "beam" in our own eye.   

I am convinced more than ever, especially in the age of social media that we live in, how easy it is to bypass the wrongs we have done by focusing on the wrongs others have done.  As long as I am fixated on the wrong you have committed against me, that's less time to fixate on the wrong I have done against someone else.  None of us like to think of ourselves as "bad people."  While, yes, there are some truly "bad people" in the world, I think that most of us are "good people" that make bad choices.  We make wrong decisions.  Let's face it, we sin.   And that's the whole point.  That's the obvious point that our Lord was making when He stated that we should not focus on the "mote" in our brother's eye when we fail to take out the "beam" in our own eye.  What did Our Lord say?  He said, "Thou Hypocrite, cast out first the beam out of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see clearly to pull out the mote that is in thy brother's eye."  (St. Luke 6:46)  Human beings are so busy searching for the faults in others that they don't see their own faults.  We would rather focus on the wrong that someone else did to us than to focus on what we did wrong.  Our Lord was making the point that first and foremost:  All of us have sinned.  All of us have done wrong to our brother.  All of us are guilty.  None of us is perfect.   And the second thing that Our Lord was pointing out is that if we are so busy looking for the faults in others, we do not have time to focus on our own fault, our own sins.  And God sent His Son into the world for ALL of us.  God sent His Son into the world to die on the Cross for ALL of us . . . . you and me.  All of us have benefited from that saving Cross on the hill at Calvary.  Let us spend less time searching for the faults in others.  This will allow us to have more time to focus on the things that we have done wrong in life.  And this will cause us to be even more grateful for the forgiveness that God is giving to us for the wrongs that we have done.  

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers together each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we gather together as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour.  And, at Communion time, we come forward to receive His Precious Body and Blood so that we can be nourished for the journey ahead.


Third Sunday After Trinity, July 2nd, 2017


In the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speaking to a group of "publicans" and "sinners," as St. Luke reminds us.  Here, in this passage that we hear appointed for the Third Sunday after Trinity, Our Lord is relating what it is like to lose something and find it again.  In this brief passage that we hear today, Our Lord gives two examples of people that have lost something and are rejoicing that they found the item:  the first example is the shepherd that lost one of his sheep; the second is the woman that lost one of her silver coins.    Everyone of us can relate to this joyful feeling, I am quite sure.   How many of us have "misplaced" something and you do not realize it is "misplaced" until you actually need it and then suddenly "panic" sets in because the certain item that you need is nowhere to be found.  After that you spend however long it is until the find what you need.  In my house, I refer to it as being "organized into oblivion."  Depending on what you are looking for and how important it is will determine how long it is you search for the item.  Important papers . . . .  books . . . .  clothing items .  . . .  and one item that is always seems to come up missing:  the remote control.  And then when you find what you are looking for . . .  . again, this will depend on the "importance" of what you just found . . . . what happens?  You breathe a sigh of relief.  When you were searching for the "said item" that was misplaced, how many emotions were involved?  Panic?  Frustration?  Anger?  Confusion?   "Oh, where is it?  I just had it HERE!"  But then when you find what you are looking for:    "Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh . . . .  ."   A sense of relief sets in.  

In today's passage, Our Blessed Saviour relates in both examples  that when the owners found what they were looking for they wanted to share their joy:  "Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost."  How many of us share our feelings with those around us?  With social media such as FB or Twitter or countless others, it is certainly easy enough to do.  How about those of us with cellular phones?  Texting out our feelings in just a few "clicks" is the way to go.  And when you get down the abbreviations for texting, you can describe your feelings even more quickly.  But have you ever noticed that we are quick to describe when we are mad about something?  When we have a bad experience, we are quick to tell everyone about it.  For example, if we had a bad experience at a restaurant, we might tell the manager; we might fill out a survey card.  If we are mad enough, we might make a point to look up the corporate offices and let them know of our experience.  We will write scathing reviews and post it on FB and Twitter and anything else.  We will tell our friends.  We will let the whole wide world know  . . . . . via every avenue we can find handy at the time . . . . how truly "horrible" the experience was.  But how many times do we have a wonderful experience and we let it go at that.  Sure, we may feel satisfied, after a good meal, for example, and we thank the server but then we leave it at that.  "Thanks . . . the food was good . . .  and your service was great.  Thanks."  And we leave it at that.  But if the same food and the same server was just the opposite:  LOUSY!  How much time and effort would we have made letting the whole world know.  I mean, let's face it, human beings spend more time concerned with "negative things" than we do "positive things."  Look at the nightly news, for example, the first twenty minutes of the local broadcasts tell us about:  murders.  . . . deaths . . . . accidents . . .  . shootings . . .  crime . . . the price of gas going up . . . . . the Cubs losing again . . . . You get the picture.  And then after all of this, they throw in one "feel good" story.  Isn't it the same way with us?  It would seem that many of us . . .  most of us? . . . .  are more interested in "negative" stories than we are "positive" ones.   "She did what?"  "He did what to you????"  "Oh, that's horrible."  "I can't believe my ears"  "Tell me more . . . . ."    Perhaps this is because as human beings we just love the things that we shouldn't love.  This is why we want to look at the car accident as we pass by.  Or why when we are switching the channels and we see people arguing and/or fighting on "Jerry Springer."  We pause and watch because we just can not believe our eyes that two grown folks would carry on like that.  And we shake our head in disbelief but we keep watching.

Our Blessed Saviour gives us important advice today.  He reminds each of us to "rejoice" when we are happy.  And to share our joy with others.  "Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost."  As Christians, we should share this joy with those around us.  As Christians, we should share the "Good News" that we are saved.  As Christians, we need to take our faith seriously enough to let others know how good God is and what He has done for us.  And speaking of telling folks what God has done for us, how many of us are guilty of only talking to the Good Lord when things are bad?  When something is wrong, do you go running to God to ask Him to help you?  When you are nervous or anxious about something, do you go to God in prayer?  How about when things are going smoothly?  Do you still run to God and let Him know?  How often do we turn to prayer in times of trouble compared to how often we go to God when we simply want to thank Him?  Now, I am sure that would make a good comparison.   This day, make an effort to rejoice for the blessings God has given you in life.  Make it a point to dwell on the good things in life as opposed to dwelling on the negative.  As human beings, we have a tendency to dwell on the negative.  But as Christians we should dwell on the goodness of God. We should dwell on the good things He has done for us during our lifetime.  And we should spend more time in prayer thanking Him instead of simply asking for something.  


St. Margaret Church gathers together every Sunday morning and we would love for you to join us in our weekly worship of Our Heavenly Father. Mass begins at 9:30 AM. We celebrate Mass in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana. Please choose to take some time out of your busy schedule to spend some quality time with God.


Second Sunday after Trinity, June 25th, 2017

In the Fourteenth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear about Our Blessed Saviour going to eat at "the house of one of the chief Pharisees to eat bread on the Sabbath day." (Chapter 14 verse 1).  While he was there, St. Luke tells us that Our Blessed Lord told many stories, parables and answered questions for all the guests gathered there.  Further on in this same chapter though Our Lord tells the story of a man that made a great supper and invited many people to the feast.  But as Our Lord tells the story we soon find out that many of the people that got invited to the supper came up with all kinds of excuses for not coming.  One, for example, says that he has bought property and has to go see it.  Another one states that he has bought farm animals and has to go take care of them.  Another one states that he just got married and has to take care of his wife.  Well, you get the idea.  Our Lord, as He tells the story, is pointing out that everyone that got invited to the supper is making excuses for not coming.

How many excuses do we make when it comes to having a personal relationship with God?  How many excuses do we come up with when it comes to not spending time with God?  Quite frankly, all the people in the story had legitimate reasons for not going to the supper.  All of their "excuses" were valid and yet how many "valid" excuses do we try to use to justify the fact that we do not go daily to God in prayer?  How many of us say how busy we are with work  . . . .  and chores around the house . . .  . and running errands?  Do we use our busy schedule as an excuse to justify not spending time with God?  All of us lead busy lives.  But if we are too busy to spend time with God . . . .  we are TOO busy.  The story that Our Blessed Saviour tells about the man who made a supper and invited folks represents, of course, God.  God invites each of us to have a personal relationship with Him.  The only question is whether or not we accept His invitation.  Let us prioritize our lives in such a way that we "make time" for God . . . . not make excuses for avoiding Him.  Let us go to Our Heavenly Father on a daily basis . . .  not only when we "need" Him for something.  Let each of us accept His invitation.

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning.  We gather together as a family and worship Our Heavenly Father.  We listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We listen to God speaking to each one of us.  And then we come and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.  Please take an hour out of your busy week and dedicate that hour to God.  So often we dedicate our time to ourselves, let us dedicate one hour to God.

St. Margaret Church meets at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.

Whitsunday (Pentecost), Sunday, June 4th, 2017


I am sure that you have been somewhere and you heard something that caught your attention.  For example, if you were home and you heard a crashing noise from another room and you discover the cat has knocked over a picture frame.  Or if you hear a noise from outside and you discover that someone has pulled into your driveway.  Since owning a dog, I have discovered that dogs especially listen for "strange" noises that they are not familiar with.  Each one of us can think of an example of hearing some sort of "noise" that caught our attention and set us on edge.  We read in the Second Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles when the Holy Ghost came upon the Apostles while they were gathered together.  We hear "And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, . . . ."  When I read this, I wonder what exactly does a "sound from heaven" sound like?  Here, it sounds like a "rushing mighty wind."  If that is the case, then yes, that would certainly catch my attention.  And yet is that how a "sound from heaven" always sound like?  I would imagine God speaks to us  . . . .  tries to catch our attention . . . .  tries to get us to listen  . . . in many varied ways.  Of course, a mighty, rushing wind from Heaven would more than likely catch our attention.  But how about if God whispers softly in our ears?  Would we be able to hear that?  You know sometimes my wife tries to tell me something from another room or if I am outside and she is in the house.  So the distance doesn't necessarily help me hear her and what she is saying to me.  But when you factor in things such as a television blaring.  Or a stereo booming.  Or a lawnmower cutting grass.  Well, you might as well forget about it.  I can't hear what she is saying at all.  Sometimes that is how it is with us and God.  God may be speaking to us but we may not be able to hear Him because televisions . . .  and stereos . . .  . and lawnmowers  . . . .  in other words, things of the world . . . .  are all blaring away, keeping us from hearing what God is telling us.  We need to pay attention  for what God. is telling us  We need to attune our ears to hear what God is trying to tell us.  God doesn't always send down a "mighty rushing wind from heaven" to grab our attention.  God tries to grab our attention by other ways as well.  And if we aren't paying attention, we run the risk of missing out.  Listen for God.  Set time aside for prayer.  Tune out the radios, and the televisions, and the lawnmowers of the world and spend time listening to God and what He has to say to you.

St. Margaret Church gathers together every Sunday morning and we would love for you to join us in our weekly worship of Our Heavenly Father.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Please choose to take some time out of your busy schedule to spend some quality time with God.



Sunday after Ascension, Sunday, May 28th, 2017

"THE end of all things is at hand"  (I St. Peter 4:7)  So begins the passage appointed for this Sunday's liturgy, coming to us from the Fourth Chapter of the First Epistle of St. Peter.  What happens when the "end" is near?  What exactly do we do when the "end" is near?  You may ask yourself as to the context of what exactly is "ending."  Well, I suppose it could be just about anything:  the "end of a job" . .. .  the "end of a relationship" . . . . the "end of difficulties" . . . . "the end of the world"    It could be just about anything, I suppose.  You see it is what St. Peter writes AFTER "the end of all things is at hand" that is really what we should be concerned with.  Because St. Peter immediately follows up by writing:  ". . . . be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer."  What happens when something is at an end?  As we stated a little bit ago it doesn't really matter what exactly is at an end  . . . .  a job . . . . a relationship . . . .  etc.   . . . . .  because no matter what it is most folks will react the same way time and time again.  Some people panic.  Some people try to run and hide.  Some people just plain give up.   But what is our response as a Christian supposed to be?  Well, according to St. Peter, we are called to pray:  " . . . . watch unto prayer," he writes.  But he doesn't stop there.  In the next verse he emphasizes a reaction that should be the "core" of every Christian throughout the world, he writes:  "And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves."  Of course, the key word in this sentence is "charity" but the meaning is what we would call "love."  In other words, St Peter is emphasizing that we should have "fervent love" for one another.  When you think about it, though, shouldn't this be how the Christian reacts automatically in any given situation?  We should always pray.  We should always show love.  We should always pray because it shows that we are seeking guidance from Our Heavenly Father.  We should always love because that is what Our Blessed Saviour would do.  Plus when we show love to those around us, we are showing the "Face of Christ" to the world.  So, the bottom line is that when we are faced with adversity . . . . when we are faced with difficulty.  . . when our first reaction might be to panic or to simply give up . . . . remember the advice of St. Peter for any situation:  "Pray" and "Love." 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  Please take time to join us as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father as a family.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Fifth Sunday after Easter (Rogation Sunday), May 21, 2017

Have you ever met someone . . . . maybe at work, or a childhood friend, or in the neighborhood . . . . that is "all mouth and no action?"  Someone who likes to talk a lot about what they are going to do but they never seem to follow through.  And after a while, rightly so, you learn not to depend on this person because you realize it will end up just being nothing but words.  St. James tells us:  ".BE ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves." (St. James 1:22)   For a Christian, this sounds like pretty good advice:  " . . . . be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only . . . ."  But this Epistle of St. James has caused some controversy over the years for some Christian thinkers such as Martin Luther, for example, because they contended that St. James was proposing that we can earn our way into Heaven by what we do.   Now, without a doubt, there have been various individuals who have tried to "buy their way" into Heaven by what they do.   But what do we hear from this verse ".  . . . be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only . .  ."   This is just an example of good old  fashioned common sense, if you ask me.  I say this because, as we discussed earlier, each one of us can think of a person who was "nothing but mouth."  In other words, we each know someone who talked about being a Christian but did not live as a Christian.  There are a lot of people who could explain the Christian faith and they could go on and on and on about it, but the question is:  Can they live the Christian faith and not just talk about it?  "Be ye doers of the word . . . ."  I think this is probably one of the biggest reasons why Our Blessed Lord came to earth as a human being, so that we could see Him in action.  Sure, God could have just spoken to us about being a Christian and left it at that.  But Our Lord chose to become a human being so that He could live among us, work with us, eat with us, travel with us, converse with us . . .  etc.  And, conversely, we got to see Him as well:  how He treated people, how He reacted to people, how He cured people, how He loved people.  Our Lord was a wonderful teacher and taught the faith wonderfully . . . . but He backed up His teaching by the way in which He lived.  Each one of us must listen and hear and pay attention, that is for sure,  but once we have listened and heard and paid attention, this gets translated into how we treat people, " . . . .  be ye doers of the word  . . . . ."


Join us for Mass on Sunday, May 21st, 2017 as we gather together as God's family to hear the Word of God and to worship Our Blessed Lord.  St.Margaret of Scotland Church worships each Sunday morning beginning at  9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Second Sunday after Easter, April 30th, 2017

I remember when I was growing up . . .  I find myself saying that more and more .  . . .  . .. anyway, I remember when I was growing up, it was understood that a person started at the bottom and worked their way up from there.  To me that was how things were done.  I suppose that's why while still in high school I got a job scrubbing pots and pans in a cafeteria.  You don't get much more "bottom-rung" than that, it seems to me.  You start at the bottom and then work your way up the ladder, so to speak.  Now I don't want to paint everyone the same way.  I realize there are exceptions to every rule.  But it just seems that today, very often anyways, that people are not content to start out at the bottom and work their way up.  They want to start out at the top.  Even when someone is at the "bottom," so to speak, very often they seem to know things better than the boss.  Even where I work, the kids there seem to have an attitude that they know things better than any adult and they are always right no matter what.  Unfortunately, it's not just the kids that have this attitude at times.  I think we all have this perspective at times.  We so often have to come up with excuses when we are criticized.   We have to explain things instead of just accepting that we could have handled things differently or better.  We have to always be "in the right" or "have the last word."  The reason I am reflecting on these thoughts is because in the Tenth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, Our Blessed Lord is speaking of Himself as being the Good Shepherd.  Our Lord says:  "I am the good shepherd; and know my sheep, and am known of mine"  (St. John 10:11 ff)  Now, keep in mind that there are three different statements or observations in the above sentence:  Our Lords says that He is the "good shepherd."  He also says that He knows His sheep.  And then He ends up by saying basically that His sheep know Him. In regards to this last statement or observation, do we know the Good Shepherd?  Or to put it another way, do we know that we are His sheep?  Are we content with being His sheep?  This sounds strange to ask but do you know anyone that just has to always be right?  Do you know someone that just always has the have the final word in everything . . . . no matter what.  In the spiritual life, there are people like that as well.  When they go to God in prayer, they tell God what they want to happen instead of listening to God telling them what He wants to happen.  Do we ever go to God demanding things when we pray?  Sure, we may do our "demanding" in a nice, respectful way . . . . . . but the bottom line is that we are still telling God to do it our way.  We have things all figured out and we know what's best and so we pray not so much saying "Thy will be done" as much as we do "My will be done."  Our Lord is the Good Shepherd.  As such, there is only room for one shepherd.  Let us continually fashion ourselves and remind ourselves that He is our shepherd.  God is in control.  Let all of us remember that fact and let God be God, in other words.  As human beings we do not like to be told what to do.  We very often have to have the final word.  As devout Christians, let us remember that God is in charge and that God gets to have the final word.  Let us always remember that Christ is the Good Shepherd and that we are His sheep and to follow Him.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is a traditional Anglican parish, which uses the Anglican Missal and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We also use the King James Version of the Bible.  We believe strongly in Our Lord's words . . .  "this is My Body and this is My Blood" . . . and truly believe that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar and we receive Him at Communion time.  Come join us every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Blessed Lord.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

First Sunday after Easter, April 23rd, 2017

In the Twentieth Chapter of St. John's Gospel,  the evangelist tells us when the disciples were gathered together after Our Blessed Lord had been crucified and laid to rest in the tomb.  St John relates in verse 19 that "the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews."  Our Lord appeared to them and we can only imagine their utter shock and disbelief if we were in their position at that time.  After after Our Blessed Saviour had greeted them, St John tells us:  " . . . . He shewed unto them His hands and His side. "

How often when we are in disbelief about something . . .  anything . . . do we have to show the evidence to show what we are talking about?  If we get cut doing something, we run and show the cut.  Or if a storm has gone through and knocked down a tree or at the very least knocked down heavy branches, you tell somebody to come and look at this.  "Oh, look at that  . . . . "  As humans, we are physical beings.  We see with our eyes.  We feel with the touch of our hands.  We hear with our ears.  We want to experience something first hand by seeing it for ourselves.  Our Lord knew this and this is why He showed the disciples His wounds.  He wanted them to see with their own eyes the "evidence" that it was Him.  

In our own life . . .  for those of us who claim the name of "Christian,"  . . . . . the question remains how do we show the "evidence" of our faith?  As mentioned above, we are able to see with our eyes, for example, the result of a storm . . .  or a car crash.  We can see the fruit of our labour when we work hard on a project and we see it after completion.  Such as building an addition on a house, cleaning and organizing a room, etc.  We can see the results with our eyes with examples such as those mentioned.  But how do we "see" a person's faith?  Faith is definitely something that is internal to each one of us.  Faith itself is not something that we can "see" physically with our eyes.  And yet the faith that we have inside of us.  The faith that we have internally that demonstrates our love for God.  This same faith is translated into action.  The way that we treat others.  The way that we are moved with compassion.  The things that we do for others around us that are less fortunate.  These are all examples of how we can "see" faith.  

As human beings, we want to "see the evidence," we want to see with our own eyes.  Let us all work on "showing" others our love of God.  Let others see how much we love God by how we live our lives.  As I often say in my sermons, the majority of people that you encounter this week probably do not ever go to church.  For those people they will only see the face of Christ as it is found in you.  If this is true, what will the world see?

Mass is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join St. Margaret so that you can spend part of your Sunday morning worshiping God, hearing the Word of God in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood.

Easter Sunday, April 16th, 2017


In his Epistle written to the Colossians, St. Paul writes in the Third Chapter:  "IF ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above . . . " (Colossians 3:1)  The events of Holy Week teaches us many valuable lessons.  At the beginning, the crowds are acclaiming Our Blessed Saviour, yelling Hosanna!  Hosanna! as He made His triumphant entry into Jerusalem.  At the end of the week, He was on trial with the crowds yelling Crucify Him! Crucify Him.  This same Jesus, Who Himself was Rabbi . .  . . Teacher . . .  Friend . . . .  Miracle Worker . . . . Inspiration . . . . Image of Our Heavenly Father . . . . This same Man they saw as the great hope of Israel . . . . by the end of the week, they saw Him scourged, bloodied and beaten . . . .  and then put to death, dying in the company of two thieves.  As Our Lord was dying on that Cross, very few of those closest to Him remained to be with Him to the very end.  All the rest vanished for fear of the authorities and downcast that their "dream" had come crashing down around them on that hill at Calvary.  And yet just when everything seemed that it could not get any worse . . . .  just when life seemed that it was at the darkest hour . . . . . the Tomb was discovered empty on that first Easter morn.  The same Teacher . . . . Rabbi . . . .  Miracle Worker . . . . Who had seemed in the eyes of the world to be defeated . . . . . humiliated  . . . . and struck down in utter defeat . . . .  . He was now risen from the dead.   Each of us, as stated above, can learn a valuable lesson from this for our own lives.   So many of us get so caught up on the negative events that befall us in life.  We place more of our time and energy dwelling on the negative events.  In life, we should know by now that we experience the good and the bad.  As human beings, we suffer, yes, but we also enjoy accomplishment.  Quite frankly, one doesn't happen without the other.  An athlete, in a very simple example, does not automatically get the winning trophy right off the bat.  An athlete only gets the trophy after years and years of dedication, training, and yes, even years of defeat.  So, too, we so often have to learn from our mistakes before we can enjoy victory.  In short, Easter never would have happened without Good Friday.  The "empty tomb" never would have been possible without first the Cross.  Don't limit yourself by getting "stuck" on the defeats in your life.  Always remember that Our Blessed Saviour carried His Cross in what seemed to be defeat in the eyes of the world.  And yet His defeat turned out to be victory . . . . victory over death.  And He did it all for us . . . . . so that we could have the possibility of enjoying eternal life with Him.

Easter Sunday Mass will be held on Sunday, April 16th, 2017 at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Church.  Mass is held at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

 Please note that on Easter Sunday, we will not be in the chapel as we normally celebrate there.  Rather, we will be on the Fourth Floor of Marquette Manor.

Palm Sunday, April 9th, 2017

The Gospel appointed for Palm Sunday is taken from the Twenty-Seventh Chapter of the Gospel of St. Matthew.  In this chapter, St. Matthew describes the events leading up to the Crucifixion of Our Blessed Saviour.  One of the events described is the meeting between Our Lord and Pontius Pilate.  It is at this point in the chapter that Pilate speaks to Our Blessed Saviour:  "Then said Pilate unto him, Hearest thou not how many things they witness against thee? And he answered him to never a word; insomuch that the governor marvelled greatly."  (St. Matthew 27:13-14)  Pilate is not the only one who "marvels greatly" at the reaction of Our Lord recounted in this passage.  If you look throughout the chapter, you can not help but contrast the emotions and reactions of those around Him.  It is interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of the Lord compared to the crowd.  If you look at the example of the crowds and the chief priests and the elders mentioned in this chapter, it would seem that they were outraged, full of anger, and filled with hatred.  When we read this account from St. Matthew we feel the anger and hatred and outrage from the crowd all directed toward Our Blessed Saviour.  And despite this "venom" from those around Him, ". .  . He answered (Pilate) to never a word . . . "  This is why Pilate, as St. Matthew observes, "marvelled greatly."  It is no wonder that Pilate found this contrast amazing because on the one side he saw so much hatred . . . and anger . . . and bitterness  . . . . . and when he saw Our Lord, he did not witness any of those emotions.  How often in our own life is our first reaction to become outraged when someone has wronged us?  How often do we become angry when we feel we are in the right about something?  How often do we react with bitterness and contempt towards others around us when they have differing points of views that do not necessarily match ours?  We are called to pattern our lives after Our Blessed Lord.  Of course, as humans, we are prone to failure but we are still called to keep on trying.  All of us have reason to be outraged.  All of us have reason to feel frustrated in life.  All of us have reason to feel anger at various points now and then.  And yet it is our reaction to these feelings that we need to work on.  Are we constantly outraged like the chief priests and crowds surrounding Our Lord or are we calm and prayerful like Our Blessed Saviour?  When confronted by our enemies and those who have wronged us, is our reaction "anger" and "outrage"?  When confronted by those who hate us and are angry with us, do we ever respond with prayer for that person and a sense of calm?  As much as possible, we should be different from the world.  As much as possible, we should not conform to the world.  We achieve this by following the teachings and the example of Our Blessed Saviour. Just like Pilate "marvelled greatly" at the reaction to the outrage and the anger of the crowds, the world should "marvel greatly" at the way in which we react to anger and outrage: responding with love and prayer.

Just us for Palm Sunday on Sunday, April 9th, 2017 at 9:30 AM

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come join us as we listen to God speak to us through His Word.  At Communion time, we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ to nourish us and give us strength for our journey called life. 


Fifth Sunday in Lent, Passion Sunday, April 2nd, 2017

All throughout the Eighth Chapter of the Gospel of St. John, we are witness to the Pharisees questioning Our Lord.  Actually, if you read through this Eighth Chapter of the Gospel of St. John, it is not so much "questioning" the Pharisees are doing as much as they are "badgering" Him.   What they are doing is really "ganging up" on Him and trying to catch Him in saying something wrong in their eyes.  Later on in the chapter, Our Lord says:  "And I seek not My own glory: there is one that seeketh and judgeth." (St. John 8:50)  All of us are seeking something in life.  If you are like me, you are constantly seeking things.  Where are my shoes?  Where did I put my phone?  Where is that book that I need?  etc.   But on an even deeper level, we are constantly searching.  People, in essence, are searching for happiness deep down inside.  Now keep in mind "happiness" may take different "forms" at various times.  For example, "happiness" may be something as simple as getting a delicious hamburger at your favorite restaurant.  Or "happiness" may consist of getting a new outfit or pair of shoes.  Happiness, for some people, is found in a bottle and they feel they are happiest when they are drunk or high.  We all have things that make us happy.  And we search for that happiness until we find it.  

And Our Lord  leads us by example when He says: "And I seek not mine own glory . . . . "  (v. 50)  St. Augustine wrote in his "Confessions" that the search for happiness is ultimately a search for God.  In other words, the point he was making is this:  all of us search for happiness.  When we find something that makes us happy, yes, we are happy for a time but the happiness ultimately goes away.  For example, we are hungry and we go to our favorite restaurant and enjoy a wonderful meal  That meal leaves us satisfied . . .  but only until we become hungry again.  Or the person that finds their happiness in a bottle.  They drink and they get drunk to the point of not having a care in the world.  And then they get sober and their "happiness" goes away.  St. Augustine made the point that there are many things that cause us to be happy . . .  to be satisfied: . . .  money . . . drink . . .  power . . . . sex . . . . material things . . . . but none of these things cause permanent happiness.  They each bring you happiness for a short time but then you find yourself searching for another form of happiness again.  There is only one "happiness" that is everlasting, St. Augustine wrote, and this is God.  God is our true happiness.  And we can only find Him if we search for Him.  So many of us search for the wrong form of happiness.  We spend our days trying to search for what will make us happy and we ultimately end up miserable.  Only God and a relationship with Him will make us truly happy and leave us feeling truly satisfied.    Search for the true happiness that will never fade:  Search for God.

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come join us as we listen to God speak to us through His Word.  At Communion time, we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ to nourish us and give us strength for our journey called life. 

First Sunday in Lent, Sunday, March 5th, 2017

To begin the Sixth Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Corinthians, we hear:  "We then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain" (2 Corinthians 6:1)  As just quoted, St. Paul is reminding us that we are "workers with Him"  . . .. . 'Him' meaning God, of course.  We should often remind ourselves of these words.  I say this for a few reasons.  Firstly, God's grace is freely given.  Christ died on the Cross of His own free will to save us from our sins.  When He carried His Cross to the Hill at Calvary, He was not only carrying the Cross, He was carrying your sins and mine.  The reason I emphasize this point is that some theologians over the centuries have emphasized that we can not "work" for our salvation because salvation is offered freely by God.  This is certainly true.  And yet as St. Paul reminds us, we are called to be workers together with Him.  God has given each one of us specific skills and talents and we should use those skills and talents accordingly for the glory of God.  Secondly, we must always remember that Christ founded the Church.  Unfortunately, for generations and centuries, people got into the mindset that the "work of the Church" was done by bishops, priests, and religious brothers and sisters.  And the rest of us just sit in the pews and let the clergy and sisters do everything.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  All of us form the church, whether we are ordained or not.  All who are members of God's Church are called to do their part.  For St. Paul writes in his first epistle to the Corinthians in the Third Chapter:  "For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, ye are God's building." (1 Corinthians 3:9)  The Church is not solely a group of buildings made of brick and mortar.  The Church is comprised of you and I . . . .  sinners in need of God's forgiveness and redemption.  And we are called not only to be reminded of that fact but to remind others . . . to invite others . . .  to share that good news with others:  that Christ came first to minister to God's people; to die on the Cross in order to save them from their sins; and then to rise again on the Third Day so that we could be offered eternal life with Him.  Let us use these forty days of Lent to grow closer to God and to also be "co-workers" with Christ to share the Good News of God's redemption freely offered that so much of the world rejects out of ignorance.

Join us on Sunday, February 5th, at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the First Sunday of Lent.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Fifth Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Have you ever thought about the specific clothes you have to put on in order to go somewhere?  Probably not, because we do it  automatically without thinking.  Most of us just throw on a pair of jeans and a shirt and off we go.  But even when you go to work, do you put any thought into what you are going to wear when you go to work on a particular day?  If you work in an office and you have to dress up or even in what's come to be known as "business-casual" you probably have put some thought into what you are wearing when you go into your office.  For some people, though, their uniform is very specific and what they need to carry is very specific.  Take, for example, a police officer.  Have you ever taken notice of what a police officer has to wear or the specific things that they have to carry with them?  From the hat down to the shoes.  And on the utility belt, they have handcuffs and a gun and they also carry a radio and who knows what else they have to carry.  Same way with a nurse in the hospital, to use another example.  Have you been to a hospital lately and you see the things that a nurse has in order to be prepared for the job?  The point being is this:  we all have to be prepared for the job that we do.  So whether we wear a certain uniform or have certain tools on hand . . .  or both . . . .  we all have to be prepared in order to do a good job.  In essence, this is what St. Paul is saying to the Colossians in the Third Chapter.  He begins in verse 12:  "PUT on therefore, as the elect of God, . . . ." And then he goes on to list all of the different Christian virtues that we must have on hand in order to live as a good Christian in a often un-Christian world:  kindness . . .  humbleness of mind . . .  meekness . . . longsuffering . . .  etc.  

You see similar to the police officer or nurse or carpenter, etc., just like all of these people use specific tools for their job, so too the Christian has to be armed with specific "tools" as well in order to do his or her job in this world.  This is why St. Paul phrased it the way that he did:  "Put on therefore, as the elect of God, . .  . ."  We need to make a point to "put on" kindness . . .  we need to "put on" humbleness ..  .  . we need to "put on" meekness .   . . .  We need to put on these things, as St. Paul says, because to be a Christian is to be unlike the world in so many ways.  When those around us would choose to be angry and hateful, we know as a Christian we should choose to "put on" love.  When those around us choose to rise up and insist on having things their way, Christians are called to be humble.  You see, as Christians, the important thing to always keep in mind, is the REASON why we do what we do.  And the reason why we are called to be: loving . . .  and meek .. . . and humble  . . . and forgiving . . .  etc.  The reason why we are called to be these things is because we are called to do these things in imitation of Our Blessed Saviour.  Our Lord showed love when there was nothing but hatred.  He forgave when there was no forgiveness offered.  You see, St. Paul tells us the key to doing all of these things in Verse Seventeen:  "And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the Name of the Lord Jesus . . . "  When we love, love in the Name of Jesus . . . . when we are humble, we should be humble in the Name of Jesus . . .  when we forgive, we should forgive in the Name of Jesus.    So, again, when we go "out into the world," let us take St. Paul's advice and remember to "put on" kindness and humbleness and meekness and forgiveness and, most of all, let us remember to put on charity, . . .  in other words, love.  These are the "tools" that the Christian uses when he or she goes out into the world.  

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come join us as we listen to God speak to us through His Word.  At Communion time, we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ to nourish us and give us strength for our journey called life.

First Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 8th, 2017

All of us have had the experience of looking for something,  . . .  searching for something. In fact, if you are like me your search for something is a daily quest.  It may be something as simple as where in the world did I leave my eyeglasses this time.  Or it could be an important document that you have need of but you don't know where you placed it.  It may be a phone number that you are in need of or if you are a student, perhaps you are searching for an answer for your homework assignment.  In short, we all have something that we are searching for.  In the second chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear about St. Joseph and the Blessed Mother searching for the Child Jesus.  St. Luke tells us that they had traveled to Jerusalem for the feast of the Passover.  Again, St. Luke sets the story for us when he writes they had already left Jerusalem to return home but discovered that the Child Jesus was not in their company as they traveled.  Those of you who are parents can appreciate what St. Joseph and Our Lady were going through as they were searching for Jesus.  Really, any of us who are frantically searching for something that we need can understand to a certain extent, I am sure, their efforts in searching for Jesus.  All of us search for what we need.  We search for important letters.  We search for contact information.  We search for tools that we need in completing work around the house.  We search for recipes that we need.  The list goes on and on.  We all search for what we need.   People also search for things that bring them joy and satisfaction.  Quite frankly, this is why many people have abuse problems with drugs and alcohol because they are looking for ways to make themselves happy and feel happy.  In this material world in which we are a part, material things that we expect to bring us joy only bring us joy that is temporary.  We search for things which can bring us joy and satisfaction but only a relationship with God can bring us true satisfaction.   We search for the things which are important to us.  Search for God.  Make a conscious effort to search for God.  Make Him a part of your daily life.  God is so close and yet He is so far away from many, many people.  Make a point to search for God and make Him a part of your life.  Make Him an important part of your life because He is.   

St. Margaret Church meets each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come join us as we listen to God speak to us through His Word.  At Communion time, we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ to nourish us and give us strength for our journey called life.  

Sunday, Nativity of Our Lord, December 25th, 2016


St. Margaret Church would like to wish everyone a very Merry and Blessed Christmas.  May the Christ Child enter your heart and find a welcoming dwelling place there today and always.  

St. Margaret Church would also like to invite you to join us on Sunday, December 25th, 2016 as we celebrate the Nativity of Our Lord.  Take time out of your busy Christmas schedule and dedicate that time to the real reason for Christmas, Our Blessed Saviour and His birth.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Join us for Mass and hear the Word of God as we use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time and receive the greatest gift ever made available to Man-----Our Lord giving of Himself to you at Communion time.  

Let us continue to let Christ live in our hearts and let His love radiate to those around us today and always. Fourth Sunday in Advent, Sunday, December 18th, 2016

Sometimes your local community gets national attention  . .  .. or even worldwide attention ..  . .  and it is a great thing.  It makes you stand up and take notice on what people are taking notice of.  Recently, one of our local communities garnered that national / worldwide attention.   I am sure that some of you have heard the news coming from Knightstown, Indiana concerning that town's annual Christmas display.  Now, if you have heard of the events concerning that local Christmas display, you will realize that a lawsuit brought on by the local ACLU forced the town to take down the Cross off of the Christmas tree in their town square.  Of course, there have been supporters of this decision and also opponents.  

What I would like to speak about, quite frankly, is what does the "Cross" have to do with Christmas in the first place.  This is a fair question but it is one that has to be asked because, quite frankly,  . . . . and this leads into the main question . . .  .. what is the real meaning of Christmas?  The real meaning of Christmas is not Christmas trees.  The real meaning of Christmas is not shopping for deal-busters at Walmart .. . Macy's  . . .  Sears . .  . . The real meaning of Christmas is not going to holiday parties.  You get the idea.  Now, there is nothing wrong with any of the things mentioned above and a whole other list of things associated with Christmas but, again, those things are NOT the reason for the season.  Jesus Christ is the reason for the season.  And if Christ is indeed the true reason for the season, we cannot celebrate Christmas without thinking about the Cross.  St Paul writes in the Epistle to the Galatians:  "But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth His Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons."  (Galatians 4:4-5)  God sent His Son into the world for a purpose.  The purpose of God's Son being sent to the earth as a human being was to save us from our sins.  This is the reason for our celebration of the birth of the Divine Infant.  This is the reason why we celebrate His birth annually.  But, again, celebrating His birth is only focusing on part of the story, if you will.  But what the world typically misses is the Cross.  Again, St. Paul writes:  "For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God." (I Corinthians 1:17)  Again, to the world the Cross is foolishness.  But to us who are Christians, the Cross is what has saved us.  The Cross is the instrument that Our Blessed Saviour used to reconcile us to God.  Through this Cross Christ was able to make Himself the spotless Lamb of God sacrificed for us.  He took away our sins on that wonderful "piece of wood."  This is why we are called to never forget Christ's death on the Cross.  And for this reason, this is why I say it is perfectly appropriate to have the Cross in a Christmas display.  To celebrate the birth of Christ without remembering the real reason for His being born a human being is to only focus on part of the story.  As Christians, we need to always focus on our Blessed Saviour, to always grow closer and closer to Him.  Let us celebrate His birth but let us never forget His saving act on the Cross.  This is the real reason why He was born . .  . . to save us from our sins.  

St. Margaret of Scotland Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Join us as we listen to Holy Scripture, hear the Word of God preached, and receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.  A Coffee Hour follows Mass.



Third Sunday in Advent, (Gaudete Sunday) December 11th, 2016

Some of you know and some of you do not know that we recently got a new puppy.  He is very cute  . .  .  in fact, I would say he is adorable.  But those of you who have ever owned a puppy know that it involves a LOT of work.  L-O-T . .  . .   Even though we have already bought him lots and lots of toys of his own, he prefers to chew on rugs . . . and carpet . .  . and furniture. . .  and clothing items  . . . and the Christmas tree . . .  and Christmas tree ornaments . .  . .    I am constantly telling him:  "No, don't do that;" "No, put that down;" "No, that is not a toy;"  "No, put that back;" and etc. etc etc.  You get the idea.  Again, those of you who have ever owned a puppy are shaking your heads saying "yes, yes, we understand . .  . ."   Well, one thing I have come to realize  is that the puppy knows the meaning of the word "No."  And the thing that strikes me is that even though he knows what the word "No" means, he will go back and do the very same thing even after I tell him:  "NO!"  Truthfully, when you think about it, puppies aren't that much different from us human beings in that sense.   We know when we are doing something wrong.  We know deep down inside that we should not be acting a certain way but we keep going back time and time again to the same behaviour.  God sent His Son into the world to change all that.  God sent His Son into the world to save us from our sins.  Truthfully, God sent His Son into the world to save us from ourselves.  We keep doing the same thing over and over again even when we know we should not do it.  We keep going back to the same behaviour even though we know better.  Advent is a good time to focus on God . ..  to look forward and not backward.  Focus on that tiny little Divine Infant born on Christmas day.  Keep your eyes fixed on the reason for why He came into the world.  He came into the world to save us from our sins.  He came into the world to save us from ourselves.  Always keep your eyes fixed on God and you will never be disappointed.

St. Margaret of Scotland Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Join us as we listen to Holy Scripture, hear the Word of God preached, and receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.  A Coffee Hour follows Mass.


First Sunday in Advent, Sunday, November 27th, 2016

The Thirteenth Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans is the passage appointed for the First Sunday in Advent.  Personally, if I was forced to "name" this specific chapter, or this specific passage coming to us from St. Paul, I would probably call it the "Challenge Passage."  Why?  Because in this chapter St. Paul tells the Romans . . . . and not just them, but us as well . .. . that we are called to love one another.   In this passage that we hear today, it begins with St. Paul writing:  "Owe no man any thing, but to love one another;  for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law." (Romans 13:8)  And then he continues after that by writing:   ". . . therefore love is the fulfilling of the law" (Romans 13:10)  And, once again you ask, why would I call this particular chapter the "Challenge Passage?"  Well, quite frankly, it is difficult to love a lot of people in this world, isn't it?  There are certain people in our life that it proves to be very easy to love.  These people are kind.  They are gentle.  They might be generous to us.  They might show us love first.  They might be fun to be around.  etc.  It's easy to love people described above.  But what about loving those who do not fit the above description?  What about those people who are rude?  what about those people who are mean to us?  What about the people that, quite frankly, could be described as "jerks?"  Truth be known, every single one of us could come up with a list of people whom we consider great . .   . . . in other words, the people that make it easy to love them . . . . and a list of people that we can't stand . . . .  in other words, the people that really make it a difficult challenge to love those folks.  And yet, we know from Scripture and specifically this Thirteenth Chapter of the Epistle to the Romans that " ..  . .  love is the fulfilling of the law."  Why should we do this?  Well, quite frankly, because we are commanded to do so as Christians.  But, in my humble opinion, more importantly, we need to do it because we need to follow Our Blessed Lord's example.  In other words, He did it.  He loved those who did not love Him.  He showed love to those who did not show love to Him.  We don't know why sometimes, but God loves even those who do not deserve love, at least in our way of thinking.  This is proven in the fact that God sent His only begotten Son into the world on behalf of all men . . . . not just on behalf of kind men . . . .  not just on behalf of friendly men . . . .  not just on behalf of men who first do things for us . . . . He sent His Son into the world on behalf of ALL humanity, not just some.  Let us spend this holy season of Advent preparing ourselves for the coming of the Christ Child.  Let us welcome Him into our heart and prepare by imitating Him in our love of others.  Not just love for those who deserve our love  . . . . but working on loving those who do not show love to us because this is what Our Saviour did . . . .  He loved those who did not even love Him.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday at 9:30 AM at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship. 


The Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland (Transferred), 
Sunday, November 20th, 2016

On Sunday, November 20th, 2016 we will be celebrating the feast day of our patroness, St. Margaret of Scotland.  The actual feast day for St. Margaret is on November 16th but our celebration is transferred this year to November 20th.  Please join us as we celebrate the feast day of the patron saint of our parish.

In St. Matthew, Chapter 13, we hear Our Blessed Lord speaking in regards to "the Kingdom of Heaven."   In this chapter, Our Blessed Saviour is using different examples to show what the Kingdom of Heaven is like.  In each of these examples, Our Lord uses parables to describe the Kingdom of Heaven.  Even at one point in this chapter, the disciples came and questioned Our Lord:  "Why speakest Thou unto them in parables?" (St. Matthew 13:10)  In the Gospel passage appointed for today's liturgy, we hear the following:  "The kingdom of heaven is like unto treasure hid in a field"  (St Matthew 13:44)  In other words, very often something very valuable is something that has to be worked for.  In our own lives this is true as well.  If you set your mind on something and work and work and work towards obtaining this item, we seem to appreciate it even more because we realize how much it cost us to obtain.  And yet if something did not cost us anything to obtain, we don't seem to appreciate it as much.  Our Lord seems to be saying the same thing about the Kingdom of Heaven in all the parables He is giving in Chapter 13.  In other words, we need to search for the Kingdom of Heaven.  Additionally, Our Lord compares the Kingdom of Heaven to a treasure that is highly treasured and sought after.  In other words, in all of these parables spoke of and recorded in chapter 13, the bottom line is that we seek after things that we consider valuable.  If something does not prove of interest to us, we do not waste our time with it.  If something seems to hold value to us, then we will invest our time in pursuing whatever it is.  We will treasure the Kingdom of Heaven only if we believe it to be valuable.  So many people today do not pursue anything of God because these people find their treasure elsewhere: their treasure is in material items, or pleasures, or drink, or drugs, or power.  None of these prove to be ever-lasting.  They all fade with time.  The only true, ever-lasting treasure is our relationship with God.  This is the only treasure that has the "ability" to least an eternity.  This is the "treasure" that we should work on obtaining and keeping.

Join us on Sunday, November 20th, 2016 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland, the patron saint of our parish.  Join us as we listen to God's Word found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  

We worship in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  



Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Trinity, 

(Second Sunday before Advent), 
Sunday, November 13th, 2016

If you are anything like me, you avoid watching the news if at all possible.  The "local" news is filled with nothing but reports of crime, deaths and murders.  The "national" news is filled with . . .well,  .  . .  crime, deaths and murders.  But, nonetheless, it is hard to miss the news coming out this week.  Of course at the beginning of this past week everyone was talking about the election and who would win.   But once the election was over, soon the attention of the media turned to "protests" against who won the election.   I put the word "protests" in quotation marks because, in my humble opinion, they aren't "protests" as much as they are "riots."  But I'll get to that more in a bit.  It's interesting that I saw a meme on Facebook in the past few days and the meme is a picture of "protesters" amid smoke and fires and litter and broken glass scattered all around them and the message goes something like this:  "Claims Trump will destroy America . . . .  as they go about destroying America."  To me, what we have seen in the past few days on TV, as I stated earlier, are not so much protests as they are riots.  Oh, I know the media labels these events as protests but, honestly, they resemble riots more than they resemble protests, if you ask me.  

Come to think about it, if you were to ask me my opinion, these events that we have come to witness in various cities are really closer to a big, collective "Temper Tantrum."   Temper Tantrums, if you recall, are something that two year old and three year old children throw when they do not get their way.  They yell and they scream and they cry.  They throw things and maybe even break things.  They do all this in hopes of getting their way.  Most people, though, quite frankly grow out of this stage.  They grow and mature physically but, more importantly, they grow and mature mentally and emotionally.  Generally speaking, if I am allowed to generalize here, there are a lot of people today who have never matured emotionally.  They are stuck in the stage where if they don't get what they want, they throw a fit.  Life is not about getting what we want when we want it, if you want to know the truth.  Life is about working for what you want.  Sometimes, to be honest with you, even when you work your tail off you will find that sometimes things don't go your way.  Usually, I find this to be the case when I work and work and work to pay off bills and then when I've got a major bill paid off . . .  it never fails . . . .  something breaks or needs to be replaced.  And then I have to jump on the bill-paying merry go round all over again.  Again, life is not about getting what you want when you want it.  Life is not about treating others with contempt who have a different opinion than you do.  Life is not about going to "safe spaces" so that you will not have to listen to other "big, scary people" and their "big, scary words."  Life is difficult.  Life is hard.  But, as Bishop Sheen reminded us, Life is certainly worth living.

We are reminded in the third chapter of the Epistle to the Colossians:  "Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, a heart of compassion, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering: forbearing one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye."  (Colossians 3:12 ff)  You see, we are called to be kind .. . . and humble . . .  and meek  . . . and understanding of others.  And why is this?  Because Our Blessed Saviour was all of these things.  That's why we are called to be these things.  Being a Christian is not easy.  This whole "turning the other cheek" business is difficult to say the least.  And yet this is what Our Blessed Saviour did while he was on the earth dealing with difficult people.  . ..  dealing with people that hated Him . . . .  dealing with people that wanted Him dead.  How did He react to these folks?  Well, ultimately, He stated while hanging from the Cross, nonetheless:  "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do."  We are called both by word and also by the example of Our Lord to treat others with love and charity  . . . . even to those with whom we disagree.  This is where we show our Christianity.  Our Lord said:  "For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye?  for sinners also love those that love them . . .  but love your enemines, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again: and your reward shall be great, and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for He is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil."   And then Our Lord finishes up with:  "Be ye therefore merciful as your Father also is merciful."  (St Luke 6:32-36)  Strong words.  Difficult words and concepts to follow, to say the least.  And yet Our Lord practiced what He preached.  

Join us on Sunday morning at St. Margaret Church as we come together as God's family to worship Him.  We gather together each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time. Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity, 
(Third Sunday before Advent), 
Sunday, November 6th, 2016

When you go shopping are there just certain brand-names that you trust?  When you see a certain company's name on a product, does it automatically register "quality" in your mind?  Or on the other hand, when you see a certain product name, do you avoid it at all costs?  Very often this trust . . .  or dis-trust, for that matter .. .  comes from experience, doesn't it?  In other words, if we get whatever brand of laundry detergent and we use it a few times and our clothes look bright and appear brand new after a wash.  Or they smell fresh like spring.  Well, if this experience continues to be the case for us each time we buy that product, for us that brand is a "winner."  On the other hand, if we buy  a product at the store and it turns out to be lousy or does not meet our expectations, our faith in that product will be lacking and we likely won't buy that brand any time soon.  Again, in either case, whether we like a product or whether we do not like a product, more than likely both are based on experience.  The same can be true of going to a restaurant.  If we had a good experience  . . . . the food was good . . . the service was excellent . .  . the price was not over-whelming . . .  then, by all means, our opinion of that establishment will be high.  Conversely, our  opinion of that same establishment will be lacking if the food was lousy or the service was poor, for example.  So, very often our faith in a product, or lack of faith in a product, is based on experience.   Or it could be based on the experience of others, quite frankly.  If one of our friends or coworkers tells us that a certain restaurant was horrible, we probably will be hesitant to go there any time soon.  But if that same person that you trust tells you that a restaurant is simply wonderful, you will probably make a point to eat there yourself.

St. Paul writes in his Epistle to the Colossians:  ". . . . since we heard of your faith in Christ Jesus " (Colossians 1:3 ff)  In this sense, where does "faith" in God come from?  Very often we learn about God from other people: our parents; our grandparents; etc.  As children, our parents perhaps take us to church or we go to Sunday School or we might go to Vacation Bible School in the summer months.  As we grow, we still are influenced by what we hear and see about God coming from others around us, but as we grow spiritually, we need to experience our own "faith" in God.  You see, our faith life is very much like a journey that we travel on.  Sometimes the road is very easy.  Other times it might be rough or rocky.  Sometimes there are a twists and turns that we were not expecting.  Often, our journey does not match up with our expectations or what we were planning on.  Faith, though, in God is something completely different.  We know that we can depend on God.  We know that He will never leave us.   But again faith comes mainly from experience but first we have to "experience" God ourselves.  So many people give up on God because their experience of Him is lacking.  They have no faith because they have not seen Him.  But it could be that they have not seen Him because they were not really looking to begin with.   Let us tell people about God by the way in which we live our life.  Let us tell people about God by the way in which we treat others around us with love and compassion.  Let people see the "faith" in us by always staying constant, by always being sure no matter what befalls us.  Let people know about your faith in God by letting them see the life you lead and the attitude you have.

Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, November 6th, 2016 at St. Margaret Church.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We worship together as God's family and listen to His Word.  Then we receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  Take one hour out of your busy week and dedicate it solely to God.  You'll be glad you did.  

Feast of Christ the King, Sunday, October 30th, 2016


In the Eighteenth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear of the conversation back and forth between Pilate and Our Blessed Saviour.  You see, Our Lord was brought before Pilate and Pilate was determining the fate of Our Lord.  As such, Pilate asked Our Lord: "Art thou the King of the Jews?" (St. Matthew 18:33 ff)   It seems like a very odd question for Pilate to ask Our Lord at face value.  I mean, Our Lord was brought to Pilate as a prisoner . . . as a common criminal awaiting sentencing  . .  . and not as visiting royalty.  And yet it was certainly a valid question to ask Our Lord because each one of us is forced to ask the same question:  "Art Thou a King?"  Pilate asked specifically if Our Lord was "King of the Jews" and he specified it this way because this was the people he was dealing with, the Jewish citizens of that region.  But, as I say, each one of has to ask this pertinent question:  "Art Thou a King?"  You see, a "king" is ruler over a specific area such as a country or an empire, if that be the case.  In the case of Our Blessed Saviour, He does not claim . . . nor does He want  . . . to be the ruler of a specific geographic region.  This is why He said later on in this same chapter in response to Pilate:  "My kingdom is not of this world"  For our purpose, though, what is Jesus the king of?  Well, quite frankly, that is up to us, isn't it?  You see, Our Lord, as I have said in the past is a perfect gentleman.  He never forces His way in.  He never forces His opinion on anyone.  He allows us to choose.  In fact, He gives us the opportunity to choose.  He wants to be the ruler not of a specific country or even of an empire here on earth.  He wants to be the King of your heart.  You see, only you can make Him the King of your heart.  Only you can enthrone Him in your heart.  We do this by doing our best to listen to Him and follow Him on a daily basis.  Make Him the King and Ruler of your heart. 

Two opportunities for Mass on Sunday, October 30th, 2016:

At 9:30 AM, St. Margaret Church gathers together to worship God.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  
At 1:00 PM, Holy Spirit Church comes together to worship Our Risen Saviour.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.

Come worship at either church.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.


Twenty-First Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 16th, 2016

From the Sixth Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, we hear:  "MY brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might."  (Ephesians 6:10)  Have you ever been strong for someone else?  Or, for that matter, has anyone ever been strong for you?   Each one of us face struggles and hardships and difficulties throughout our life.  Now, it may not be every single day but sometimes we just get overwhelmed with the "hard-balls" that life throws at us.  It is at those times that it is indeed easy to feel overwhelmed.   Maybe we are facing severe financial difficulties where we do not know where we can get the money to cover the bills . . . the mortgage . .  the rent.  Maybe it might be the loss of a job and nobody is calling you for an interview.  Maybe it might be a time where you are facing health difficulties like you have never faced before.   Whatever example you can come up with, it is probably easy to come up with a few different times where you felt overwhelmed, stressed out, and totally dejected.  If you are anything like me, at those times when it seemed like I hit rock-bottom, there was someone there who gave me the strength to carry on, to move forward.  There have been many people like that in my life:  my parents; dear friends; priests and / or clergy; teachers; etc.  These people have given me strength through motivating me, encouraging me, giving me advice, counseling me.  They were there to urge me on when I did not want to go on . . .  they were there for me when I had given up the battle  . . .  they were there when I had given up on myself.  I am sure that you can think of someone in your life that has filled that role for you.  They give you strength that you never knew that you had.  This is how it is with God.  God gives us strength when we need it the most.  He does this by encouraging us and motivating us to move forward.  He also does this by example.  Our Blessed Lord faced everything that we face:  He faced hardship . . .  He faced trials . . .  He faced persecution .  .. . He faced hatred, ridicule, envy, jealousy.  You name it, Our Blessed Lord faced it.  And yet He kept moving forward while keeping His eye on doing the will of His Heavenly Father.  We are called to do the very same thing.  And we need to be strong, as St. Paul writes, "strong in the Lord."  Our Lord promised to never leave us.  He is always there for us, no matter the circumstances.  

Please join us for Mass.  Take time out of your busy schedules to worship God.  Listen to the Word of God through the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  And receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

Two opportunities for Mass on Sunday, October 16th.  

Mass begins at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Church in Indianapolis.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Mass is also offered at 1:00 PM at Holy Spirit Church in Greenfield, Indiana.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street near downtown Greenfield.

Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 2nd, 2016


Sometimes things do not match up in reality as they do in our minds. Case in point, have you ever heard a recording of yourself speaking on a video or audio recording?  If you are like me, when I hear myself speak, I don't think I sound like that.  Sometimes in other ways our perception of ourself does not match up with reality.  When that is the case, it is good to have a trusted friend or relative let us know how things really are in reality.  Some friends can be brutally honest, can't they?   In reality, people that don't care deeply about us tell us what we want to hear while people who love us tell us what we need to hear.  God is like this.  We can not lie to God. He knows us inside and out. We need to present ourselves to God and be open to hear what He is saying to us.  Sometimes we can not hear God speaking to us because of all the noise and distractions going on around us.  The problem is that we blame God for not speaking to us when in reality He was speaking to us all along but it was us that refused to listen. Silence the world as much as possible so that you can hear God speaking to you. 

Join us for Mass on Sunday, October 2nd, 2016.  Mass is offered at St. Margaret Church, which worships at the Chapel at Marqutte Manor located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis.  Mass is also offered at Holy Spirit Church in Greenfield at 1:00 PM.  Mass is celebrated at the First Presbyterian Church, located at the corner of South and Pennsylvania Streets. 


Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 25th, 2016

When Our Blessed Saviour was questioned as to what was the greatest commandment, Our Lord responded that we are to love God with all our heart . . . all our soul .. . and with all our mind.  And then He followed it up by saying the second part is:  "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself."  (St. Matthew 22:34 ff)  Now if you ask me it is this second part that is the absolute hardest to do in this life.  Now, let's face it, some people that we know are hard to love because . . . . well, they're hard to love because they are complete morons.  Let's be honest here.  There's a whole lot of people in this world that we could probably do a very good job of showing love to if it were not for they fact that they were such total jerks to begin with.  Some people are just not lovable, we say to ourselves.  They are mean . . .  and hateful . . . . and bitter . . . . and jealous ..  . .. and vindictive . . . .  and greedy . . . .  Do I need to continue?   Sure, every person that is reading this right now can come up with a dozen people . . . a hundred people  . . . . that fit the above description.  And so we use that as an excuse not to show love to those people.  Unfortunately, there are at least two major problems with that.  Firstly, when Jesus stated that we are called to " . . . .  love thy neighbor as thyself," He didn't qualify the statement, for example, by saying  " . . . . only love those neighbors who are nice to you."   . . . . or "only love those neighbors worthy of your love"  . . .  or "only love those neighbors who will show love back to you."  Our Blessed Saviour stated to love our neighbor. Period.  No qualifications added to it.  Just a pure and simple "Love thy neighbor as thyself."  Secondly, the adjectives that I mentioned above . . . .  mean . .  . hateful . . . bitter . . .  jealous . . .. .  greedy . .. angry . ..  etc.   In all honesty, these words could very well describe us at times.  Sometimes we are hateful.  Sometimes we are mean to those around us.  Sometimes we are bitter . . .  . and jealous . . . and greedy . . .  None of us are perfect.  All of us are in need of God's forgiveness and His blessing in our life.  As such, we need to always remember that as faithful, committed Christians, we need to realize that to those around us, we might be the only "face of Christ" that they see in their life.  The famous Bishop Fulton Sheen once stated that it is "a priest who makes Christ visible."  I certainly agree with this thought but I would take it a step further:  It is faithful, committed, loving Christians who make Christ visible . .. . to the world around them.  Show love to those around you.  Show love to those who do not show love back.  Show love to those that even hate you.  This is not easy, to say the least, but isn't this what Christ did?   He showed compassion to those who were not compassionate.  He showed forgiveness to those who did not show forgiveness.  He showed love to those who only showed hatred.  When we love our neighbor as ourself, we are not only following the great commandment, we are following the example of Our Blessed Saviour Himself.   We are imitating the way in which Our Lord showed love to those around Him. 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers together each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we gather together as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour.  And, at Communion time, we come forward to receive His Precious Body and Blood so that we can be nourished for the journey ahead.


Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 11th, 2016

In the Third Chapter of the Epistle to the Ephesians, we are reminded "that Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith"  (Ephesians 3:13 ff).  I have been preaching now for over twenty years.  The more I preach, the more I seem to emphasize that each one of should prepare a special place in our heart where only Christ can dwell.  It stands to reason that for any king,  . .  . or queen, . . .  or head of state such as a president or prime minister, . . . .  for anyone in charge, for that matter, we go to special lengths to prepare a place for them.  If someone special is coming to visit you . . . such as a beloved relative or a dear friend whom you have not seen for a long time . . .  if someone special is coming to visit your home, you go to special efforts to prepare a place for them.  You clean up your home.  You put things away.  You spruce up and dust and put things in order as best as you can.  Why do we do all of this?  Out of love and out of respect, of course.  We want to be good hosts, of course, and we do it because we want to show love and respect for the person visiting.  When a head of state such as a king or queen or president comes to visit your country, a special place is prepared for the visiting dignitary.  When the boss of your company or corporation comes to visit where you work, you clean up and prepare as much as possible to make sure everything looks top-notch.  It just stands to reason that when someone important visits you, you prepare a place for that person and you do your best to make sure everything is in place.  "The Lord is my strength and song, and He is become my salvation: He is my God, and I will prepare Him an habitation"  (Exodus 15:2)  The place that each one of us can prepare a habitation for God to dwell is in our heart.  This, quite frankly, is the place where Christ wants to rule.  "For where your treasure is, there will be your heart also." (St. Luke 12:34)  Christ is our treasure ..  . . the love of Christ is our one possession that will last forever.  While all of our other "treasures" will eventually fade away .  . . . . whether they rust  away . . .  or break . .  . or fall out of style . . . . the love of Christ will never fail us.   So prepare a special place in your heart.  Prepare room in your heart for Christ.  That is the one throne He truly desires to occupy . . .  the one in your heart.  

The Mass at St. Margaret of Scotland Parish  is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God and receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament.  Take one hour of your busy week and dedicate it to God.  The "world" gets so much of your attention, dedicate at least one hour to God!


Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 4th, 2016


When you stop to think about it, it's amazing how many things we "need" in life.  Our days are filled with "needs" from the time we get up until the time we finally go to bed.  I bet you never even think about it . .  . . I certainly don't.  But think about it.  When you get up in the morning, it may very will be:  "I need to go to the bathroom;" or "I need to get ready for work;" "I need some coffee;" "I need to get some breakfast;" "I need to leave for work;"  "I need to go to the store;" "I need to cut the grass;"  "I need to take out the trash;"  "I need to get to bed so that I can get some sleep;" etc.  Now, don't get me wrong, we may not come right out and say, "I need to do this" or "I need to do that" but the point is the same: from the time we get up in the morning until the time we fall asleep at night, our days are filled with things we need to do or desires that we need to fulfill.  And the examples I listed above are just the "little daily things" that we need to do every day.  What about the times when we say . .  . either out loud or simply to ourselves . . .  . "I need to go on vacation;" "I need to get a better car;" etc.   Again, whether we call them: needs; desires; or worries, our days are filled with things that we want to do or need to do.  And human beings just go from fulfilling one need to fulfilling the next need.  But, Our Blessed Saviour warns us against worrying about anything, whether it be the food or drink that we need or the clothing that we wear.  He says in St. Mathew, chapter six:  " . . . . for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things."   Everything falls into place eventually, I have found in my own life.  But that does not mean I do not worry about things that I need or about the things that I need to get accomplished.  It's just human nature, I suppose.  

God knows what we need.  God knows what we need to get done.  As Christians, we are called to dedicate our lives to Christ as Our Lord and Saviour.  So many people dedicate their lives to what they need and what they desire.  Drink, . . .  Food,  . . . . Material Possessions,  . . . . Money,  . . . . Power.  These are the things that so many people want and desire.  These people have no time for God because they are too busy trying to fulfill their worldly lusts and desires.  Again, as human beings we have desires and needs.  For example, we desire to eat because we need to eat in order to survive.  But we can not let our desire become our primary reason for living.  There is certainly nothing wrong with eating, to continue with that example, but we can not let eating control our lives.  We can not let the desire for food be our reason for living.  So many people do just this.  They allow their desires to rule their life.  God knows what we need.  God even knows what we desire. Dedicate your life to God.  Let Him take priority in your life.  Once you do that, everything else will fall into place.  

Please consider joining us for Mass.  Come hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Consider setting aside an hour of your week where you can dedicate that time solely to God.  Come hear the Word of God.  Listen to God speaking to you directly and hear what He has to say for YOU!  Receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time to be strengthened and nourished for your journey!

Mass will be offered twice on Sunday, September 4th, 2016:

Join us at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret church.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us at 1:00 PM at Holy Spirit church.  We worship at the historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.


Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, August 28th, 2016

In the Seventeenth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear about the time in which Our Blessed Saviour encountered ten lepers.  We all are familiar with this passage, I am quite sure.  The bottom line is that Our Lord directed the ten lepers to go see the priest and as they went all ten were healed.  And yet this is not the point of the passage that St. Luke presents to us. As a result of being healed, only one out of the ten came back and expressed his thanks and gratitude to Our Blessed Saviour.  This action . . .  or should I say "inaction" of the other nine ..  . . caused Our Lord to voice the question to the one man that came back in front of Him:  ". . . but where are the nine?" (St. Luke 17:11 ff)  Although the event just described in St. Luke's Gospel happened some two-thousand years ago, I have no doubt whatsoever that Our Blessed Lord is still asking the very same question in our own day about us.  What do I mean?  How many people only approach God when they need something?  How many people do we know . . . . .  and in all fairness, this could describe us as well at times . . .  how many people do we know that when they get into trouble . . . when they get into a jam ..  . . . when they find themselves facing dire consequences .  . . these people go running to God.  These people pray like they've never prayed before.  They pray and pray and pray  . . .  and then they pray some more . .  . they pray that God will assist them in their time of need.  And then when their "dire emergency" passes by, these same people that prayed for God's help are nowhere to be found.  In other words, they don't seek God again until the next time they "need" Him.  When described this way, isn't that exactly what the "other" nine lepers did to Our Lord?  They cried for help in order to be healed.  But only one was able to ALSO voice thanksgiving!  How many times do we go to God only when we "need" Him?  How many times do we only go to God when we "need" His assistance?  The point I am making is that we should make an effort during our lifetime to approach God in ALL aspects of our life and not just when we "need" something.  Go to God in petition in times of trouble, yes!  But, please, do not go to God ONLY when you need something!  Pray for God's help but also pray to God in times of thanksgiving!  Go to God in prayer when you simply want to tell Him how wonderful He is.  Go to God and spend time with God every single day and not simply when you "need" Him.  

Please join St. Margaret Church on Sunday, August 28th, 2016 as we worship Our Heavenly Father as a family.  Join us as we listen to God's Word found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as Our Blessed Saviour nourishes us and strengthens us at Communion time as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood!

St. Margaret Church worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday mornings.

Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, August 21st, 2016

I remember one particular television show which I have not seen in a long time, "Hogan's Heroes."  And in this particular sitcom from the 1960's, one of the main characters is "Sgt. Schultz."  The catch-phrase, I would dare say for Sgt. Schultz would be:  "I know nothing."  He would say this when he caught Hogan and his men doing something that they should not be doing.  And the point being that Sgt. Schultz did not want to know about those things that he saw with his own eyes.  In our own lives, we see lots of things with our own eyes.  Like Sgt. Schultz, sometimes we see things we would rather not see.  But other times we see things that are wonderful to our eyes.  In the tenth chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, Our Blessed Lord is speaking to His disciples and He says to them:  "BLESSED are the eyes which see the things that ye see" (v. 23)  In this verse, of course, Our Saviour is speaking to the disciples but, quite frankly, each one of us has seen the Lord at work in our lives.  Each one of us has seen Our Blessed Lord touch our life in one way or another.  Therefore, blessed are our eyes which have seen the Lord at work in our very life as well.  As human beings, similar to Sgt. Schultz, we see what we want to see and ignore what we want to ignore.  As Christians, though, we need to make a point to look for the things of God.  We need to take note of the ways in which God is working in our life.  You see, God is with us every single day of our life.  But often times we are too busy to even notice.  God gives blessings to every single one of us on a daily basis.  Unfortunately, we usually are more interested in the things of the world to even take notice.  Have you ever had the experience where you were looking for something that you needed, like a pair of eyeglasses, for example,  and you searched and you looked around and you could not find it and then it turned out to be right near you and you never saw it?  It was in plain view all along but you never saw it even though it was right by you all the time.  That's how it is with God very often.  God is with us each and every day.  God blesses us each and every day.  And yet despite this fact, so often we do not take the time to notice.  So often we do not even realize that God is at work in our life.  This is why we need to make the point to search for God on a daily basis.  And once we do, I think many of us will be surprised to see how close He was all along.

Please make the effort to join us on Sunday, August 21st, 2016 as we welcome Bishop Stephen Strawn to our church.  Bishop Strawn will celebrate Mass and preach.  He will let us know the powerful way that God is at work in our diocese and throughout God's church.  We are always so happy to see Bishop Strawn when he visits us and hope that you will attend to give him a warm welcome.

Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday, August 21st, 2016.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful chapel located at Marquette Manor, which is at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us as we welcome our bishop and then stay after Mass for some delicious goodies and refreshments at the coffee hour.



Eleventh Sunday after Trinity, August 7th, 2016

In the Eighteenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, Our Blessed Lord tells the story of two men.  And as usually is the case when a story like this is told, two different examples are presented in order to give a comparison.  In this case, Our Lord was contrasting the two men who in some ways might have been very much alike.  But in other ways they were very different.  In the parable that Our Lord tells, He doesn't give us much information about the two men.  In essence, we only know three things about these two men:  1)  They both went into the Temple to pray;  2) One man was a Pharisee; the other man was a publican; 3) The third thing we know is their style of prayer.  It is this third piece of information that Our Lord was trying to emphasize, of course.  This was the whole point of the parable, quite frankly.  You see, the Pharisee was focused on himself.  If you read through the Eighteenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, you can read the passage yourself.  But if you read through the passage and you read the "prayer" that the Pharisee gave, I think you will soon notice a pattern.  I call it the "I" pattern.  Notice how many times the word "I" is used while the Pharisee is praying:  I do this  ... .  . I did that  . . . .  I am not like others .. . .  . I  . . . . I  . . . . I  The prayer .. .  . . if you want to call it that . . . .. . seems more like an acceptance speech at a political convention than a prayer.  While on the other hand, the publican makes it simple and sweet:  "God be merciful to me a sinner."  In today's society, we seem to be so focused on ourselves all the time.  People take "selfies" with their cameras so that they can post these pictures online for everyone to see us at that specific moment.  We post updates of exactly what we are doing . . . where we are . . .  what we are feeling . . .  again, at that particular moment.  We get upset when we don't get our order in fast enough and then we yell:  "I've got things to do! I have a life!!!"  We need to satisfy our needs . . . . our cravings.  We need to protect our feelings.  We need to focus on how we feel.   And yet, Our Blessed Saviour is pointing out that what is important in life is not us . . . . it's not how we feel . . .  it's not what we need . . . . what is important in life is our relationship with God.  The bottom line is that in our culture today, we need to focus less on "I" and focus more on God.  Put God first in your life.  Spend time with Him.  Fix your heart on God and everything else will fall into place in your life.  

Join St. Margaret Church on Sunday, August 7th, 2016 as we celebrate the Eleventh Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, 8140 N. Township Line Road.   Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  

Join us as we take time our of our busy schedule to focus on God and less on ourselves.  Take time to spend quality time with God: listening to the Word of God; listening to God speaking to you; worshiping God in a respectful, reverent fashion; receiving the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.
Ninth Sunday after Trinity, July 24th, 2016

As it has come to be known, the story of the "Prodigal Son" is certainly one of the most famous stories in all of Holy Scripture, if not the most famous.   There are so many aspects of this story that it is hard to pin it down to just one thing.  Of course the story revolves around the son who decides that he would rather have the inheritance "now" rather than "later."  And as a result he spends his inheritance on lavish living and then finds himself afterwards broke, and living in squalor.  And ultimately he comes back home with the intent of begging forgiveness from his father.  In my opinion, the most wonderful part of the whole story comes at about the midway point of the story:  "But when (the son) was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him."  (St. Luke 15:20)  If you notice, Our Lord tells us that the son was still a great way off when the father saw his son.  This implies to me that the father was on the "look-out" for his son.  And then when the father did finally see his son, he ran to him.  The father did not wait for the son to come to him.  He not only went to the son.  He went running to meet his son.  

This story of the Prodigal Son is really the story of humanity.  Humanity is the "prodigal son."  We have been given the gift of life.  We have been given the gift of salvation.  But not content with these two gifts we spend our "inheritance" also on riotous living as well.  We want to live life our own way and rarely bring God into our day to day living.  And just like the prodigal son in the story, we only think about God when we need Him or when we find ourselves in desperation.  And it is  then that we go to Him for help.  Like the loving father in the story, though, Our Heavenly Father also waits for us.  Our Heavenly Father comes running to us.  But He came running to sinful mankind in the form of His Son.  He sent His Son to rescue fallen mankind from their sinfulness and pride.  God is always on the lookout for us.  He not only waits for us . . . . . He looks for us to return to Him.  He is always ready to forgive, ready to bring us back, ready to love us and embrace us.  

St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located as 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship.


Eighth Sunday after Trinity, July 17th, 2016


I am confident that every single person reading my words right now knows a thing or two about being in debt.  We can all come up with our own examples . . . in fact, I am again confident that each of us can come up with NUMEROUS examples of debt.  Whether it be debt via credit cards . ..  or debt in regards to a house mortgage or a car payment . . .  or debt for other loans  . . . .  such as student loans for college; etc.  All of us can think of debts that we have had over the years.  While some debts are unavoidable . .  . other debts we should avoid getting into at all costs possible.  For example, trying as hard as we can not to be in debt to credit card companies.  I even looked up how much "debt" the United States debt is and the source at least that I found stated it was somewhere around $19.26 Trillion dollars!!!  All of us are in debt to someone in one way or fashion, it would seem.

Even in St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans, we hear:  "Brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh." (Romans 8:12)  As stated above, all of us have been debtors at one point or another.  Very often . . .  if not every single time, come to think of it . . .  we do not want to be in debt.  Nobody wnats to be in debt, do they?  Whether we just got done paying off a credit card, only to find ourselves having to use that credit card all over again.  Or just when we get done paying off the car . . .  something goes terribly wrong.   Just last year, I remember, I had just finished paying off my car  . . . . which, of course, is a wonderful feeling, wouldn't you agree?  And then within a month or two, the car that I had just finished paying off was hit by another driver and it was destroyed.  Thus, get a replacement vehicle and get back on that monthly car payment "merry-go-round" all over again.  None of us wants to be in debt is the bottom line but sometimes we end up being in debt whether we want to or not.  This is the point that St. Paul is making to the Romans.  Some of us are in debt to our bodily urges . . . . whether it be the urges for:  food; or drink; or drugs; or sex; or urges even for what we wear or what we own.  Sometimes we become so caught up in these things that before we know it we get fixated, if you will, focused on our material needs such as food; drink; etc.  This is the point that St. Paul is making.  Let us not get so caught up with the desires of the flesh that we become a prisoner to our own desires.  Isn't that was an alcoholic is, for example, a prisoner to his or her need for a drink?  But there are so many examples that we can use.  Don't become a debtor to things of the flesh.  We are human, yes, but we are more than simply humans . . . . we are spirit as well.  Focus your energy . . .  Focus your desires . . .  Focus your attention  . . . .  to things of God instead of things of earth.  Don't become a debtor to things of this world because they are passing away.  Our true treasure awaits us:  to spend eternity with Our Heavenly Father.

Join St. Margaret Church on Sunday, July 17th, 2016 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the Eighth Sunday after Trinity.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in both the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Listen as God speaks to you through His Word.  Join together with your Brothers and Sisters in Christ as we worship Our Heavenly Father as His Family.  And also receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Seventh Sunday after Trinity, July 10th, 2016


Do you ever have a problem remembering something?  I know I do.  It's strange that I can remember something from forty years ago and yet I can't remember what I went into the kitchen to get just now.  Some things stick in our mind and other things not so well.  It seems like some things that I would like to remember, I have trouble remembering.  Other things that I would actually like to forget, I hang on to those things.  If you have problems remembering, you are not alone.  It seems like the disciples had problems remembering as well.

In the sixth chapter of the Gospel of St. Mark, we begin this chapter by listening to St. Mark recount how Our Blessed Saviour fed the four thousand.  Now, remember that back in the end of Chapter Six of this very same Gospel, we hear about the feeding of the Five thousand.  In my humble opinion, the most wonderful thing about this incredible miracle is actually not the miracle itself . . .  although feeding four thousand people with a few fish and a few pieces of bread is simply amazing.  No, what I always like to point out is what leads to this miracle.  After seeing the vast crowd gathered around Him, Our Lord says:  "I have compassion on the multitude."  In order to have compassion, you first have to take notice of someone's need.  In other words, we have a God Who is not distant.  We have a God Who is not far away.  We have a God Who takes the time to notice how we feel.  We have a God Who actually cares about His people.  Our Blessed Saviour was concerned that those who traveled from a distance would be in need of food.  

I know that all of us can think of someone in our life who cares for us . . .  whether it is a relative, or a neighbor, or a close friend, or a coworker.  We all have someone in our life that takes the time to notice when we are down.  Or that one person in our life who does simple things to show how much they care.  Perhaps they call you for no other reason just to see how you are doing.  Or they are the person you can always depend on in time of need . . . . when everybody else has given every excuse under the sun for not being there for you.  For those people that are always there for you, don't you feel like you would also like to be there for them as well?  That's how it should be for God.  God is always there for us.  Even when everyone else turns their back on us, God is always there waiting for our return to Him.  God is always faithful to us . . . . despite the fact that we are not always so faithful to Him all the time.  We should always remember the wonderful things that God has done for us.  In this, though, sometimes we are forgetful.  We forget everything that God has done for us because we get so fixated on the things of the world that grab our attention.  

Make a point to improve your memory, at least, in regards to the wonderful things that God has done for you in your life.  Never forget the faithfulness of God.  Yes, God is faithful to you when it is us that should be faithful to Him.  Never forget that.

Sixth Sunday after Trinity, July 3rd, 2016

When I was growing up I remember clearly our city had a local TV host who showed old "monster movies" every Friday night such as the werewolf  .. .. . or the mummy ... . or Count Dracula.  These would be the old movies from the 1940's or 1950's, keep in mind so they wouldn't be gory like horror movies are today.  Anyway, I remember watching "Frankenstein" when I was a young boy.  And, of course, the premise is that Dr. Frankenstein brings a man back from the dead and raises him to life again.  I am sure we are all familiar with the story line either through reading the original book or watching countless movie versions.  Now the reason this example comes to mind, I suppose, is that sin seems to be a lot like Frankenstein's monster because it keeps coming back to life again in our lives.  In the sixth chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, we hear:  "For he that is dead is freed from sin."  Now, this seems to be pretty clear-cut.  But for human beings sin seems to be like a weed that keeps coming back and back and back again.  We spray weed killer and the weeds are gone for a while but then they come back again somewhere else.   Sin is that weed in our life that keeps coming back and back and back again.  The only way we can get rid of sin in our lives completely is to focus our life on Christ . ..  to center our life on Christ . . .  Further on in Chapter Six of the Epistle to the Romans, we hear:  "Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord."  If we imagine the example of a drinking glass or a pitcher or any sort of container, we know that as long as the container is filled up, you can not fit anything else in.  Thus, if our life is filled up with sinful behaviors:  hatred . . . anger . ..  lust . . .  envy ...  . whatever sin that plagues us on a regular basis . .  . replace those sins with thoughts of Christ.  Replace those sinful thoughts with thoughts of God.  Fill up your heart with the love of God.  If your heart is filled with God-centered thoughts, there will be no room for thoughts of hatred, envy, anger, etc.  If your heart is focused on God and on things of God, it will not have any opportunity to be focused on anything else.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland  Church on Sunday, July 3rd, 2016 as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we listen to God's Word found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time to nourish us and sustain us in our Christian journey.

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.

Fifth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 26th, 2016

Now at the beginning of the the fifth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, St. Luke kindly points out as he begins this chapter that as Our Lord passed by, He saw some fishermen already out of their boats and they were in the process of washing their nets.  Now, keep in mind that the mere fact that they were out of the boats and washing their nets shows that they were done for they day.  They had not caught anything . . . they were tired . . . perhaps even very frustrated, I would dare say . . . and they were cleaning up so that they could call it a day.  And here comes Our Lord in their presence telling them to put out their boats to give it one more try.  The response of St. Peter is what we need to focus on.  We already know that he thought this was pointless to go out again for the reasons outlined above.  And yet what was the response of St. Peter?  " . . . nevertheless at thy word  . . . "  (St. Luke 5:1ff)  When we say we trust in someone's word, what does that mean?  What does a person's word signify?  A person's word signifies a number of things, quite frankly.  First and foremost, a person's word represents our trust in that person.  If I trust a person and they give me their word they will do something, I trust that person.  I believe that they will do what they say.  With God, though, this is called faith.  We know without a shadow of a doubt that God will see us through any strife or tribulation.  Faith is knowing that God is in charge and that He will do His part.  Now, keep in mind that we may not always know how this will take place or exactly what steps will be taken.  But then again neither did St. Peter when Our Lord requested that he take the boats out for one more try.  St. Peter responded " . . .  nevertheless at thy word .  . ." This needs to be our response to God as well on a daily basis.  

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Church on Sunday, June 26th, 2016 as we celebrate the Fifth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.   We gather together as a family each and every Sunday to worship God in a respectful, traditional manner.  And we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time in order to nourish and strengthen us for the journey called "Life."  

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  

Fourth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 19th, 2016


The Bible is often referred to as "The Good Book."  I refer to it by this name sometimes in my sermons or when I speak in general.  But, actually, as most of us know, the "Good Book" is really many smaller "books" added together into one large volume that we know as the "Holy Bible" or the "Good Book."  As such, you know as well as I that there is a lot of wisdom that can be gained by reading the pages contained in the "Good Book."  There is much to be learned from reading the Bible, obviously.  It is God's Word after all.  But some people pick and choose which verses from the Bible they want to focus on.  In fact, you will hear verses of the Bible quoted by people to try and support their position or justify their beliefs.  For example, sometimes either in person or on TV or in a movie, you will hear someone say " . . . . an eye for an eye . . . ."  And typically when you hear someone say that in a movie or in person, the context is that if someone hurts you you are going to hurt them right back in the same way.  People must have been in the habit of using this Scripture verse to justify their actions two-thousand years ago because even Our Lord takes time to speak about it.  "Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for and eye, and a tooth for a tooth: But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also." (St. Matthew 5:38-39)  So you see even back then Our Lord had to explain things and put things into proper perspective.  God is not about revenge and hatred and "getting even."  Listen to Our Lord putting things into proper perspective:  "BE ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful." (St. Luke 6:36)  It is never wise to "pick and choose" Scripture verses to justify our own beliefs.  There is ample opportunity to "pick and choose" random Bible verses if some people choose to do that.  But as I say so often in my sermons, we need to know the context of what the specific Scripture verse is that we are reading and/or citing.  So, too, we need to do this with God in general.  Our Blessed Lord showed us the "context" of His Heavenly Father:  God is merciful. God is love.  And as we heard above, we are called to be merciful as Our Father is also merciful  Is this easy?  No, certainly not.  But on the other hand, how easy was it for Our Blessed Lord, hanging from the Cross after hours of being tortured, bruised and beaten to say:  "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do" ?   All we can do in these situations is to remember Our Lord's words "Be ye therefor merciful as your Father also is merciful."

Please join us on Sunday, June 19th, 2016 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass for the Fourth Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join with us as we listen to the Word of God found not only in the King James Version of the Bible but also from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as God speaks directly to each one of us.  Take just one hour out of your busy schedules so that you can worship Our Blessed Saviour and dedicate that time to the One Who gives you so much.  And, finally, join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood in Holy Communion



Third Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 12th, 2016


I am sure that you have lost something at some point . . . or misplaced something . . . that you were looking for and you can not find it.  Or you organize things or do a good cleaning and afterwards you suddenly do not know where something is that you need.  If this happens, what do you do?  Of course, you search high and low until you find what you are looking for.  I can only speak for myself but not being able to find something that you are looking for is one of the most frustrating things in life.  We search for things that we need.  We search for things that are important to us.  We search for things that we need to find.  We place time and effort into searching for something that we either need or is important to us.  If we didn't need it  . . .  or if it was of no importance . . . .  we wouldn't care about the lost/missing item.  In the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Lord speaking to the publicans and sinners.   But as He is speaking, St. Luke lets us know that the Pharisees and scribes started talking among themselves that Our Lord "receiveth sinners, and eateth with them." (St. Luke 15:2)  Our Lord noticed the objection that they were making and responded by telling a parable.  In the parable, He spoke about the example of the man who searched for the lost sheep and the woman who lost the one piece of silver.  In the case of the man with the lost sheep, Our Lord pointed out that the man still had the Ninety-Nine sheep but he was worried about the one lost sheep; and the woman still had Nine pieces of silver, but she was concerned about the one missing piece that she could not account for.  After much searching for  the lost piece of silver, Our Lord stated the woman's words: "Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost." (St. Luke 15:9)  God sent His only Son into the world because we were lost.  We are lost without God.  God searches for us, hoping that we will return to Him.  If we were not important to Him, He would not have sent His Son into the world to redeem us with His Precious Blood.   Keep in mind we only search for things that are valuable to us; important to us.  We have value to God and this is why He goes to great lengths to find us.  Conversely, the reason why so many people throughout the world do not search for God is because other things (money; power; possessions; booze; drugs; etc.) are what is important to those people.  We only search for things that we need or are dear to us.  Make a point to search for God.  Make a point to remind yourself that God is the most important person in your life.  Make a point to find Him.  There is nothing more important than God in our life.

Join us on Sunday, June 12th, 2016 as we celebrate the Third Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret parish worships every Sunday at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Lord at Communion time.  Afterwards, we have a coffee hour where we enjoy delicious goodies and fellowship.




Second Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 5, 2016

It always amazes me that some people make doing something look so easy.  For example, some people I see do carpentry work make it look so easy.  Me, on the other hand, have trouble hammering a single nail.  Other people have an amazing talent for numbers and math.  Again, math is something I struggle with.  But all of us have certain struggles and all of us have certain things that we are skilled at.  As Christians, though, all of us are directed to do something very difficult:  to love everyone.  If we look to the Third Chapter of the First Epistle of St. John, we hear: "We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren."  (I St. John 3:13 ff) Let's face it, this is more than likely the most difficult thing about being a Christian.  Human beings have emotions.  Very often, we are led by our emotions.  And if someone hurts us, we will not like that person very much.  But what Christ directed us to do is to love one another and not "like one another."  We will not "like" every single person that we meet.  But we can still do our best to "love" every single person that we meet.  Some people will rub us the wrong way with their personalities.  Other people we will admire right away.  But we are called to love one another.  I would say this is true for a few different reasons:  first, because Our Blessed Saviour directed us to do so.  And next because everyone we meet was also created in the image and likeness of God just like we were.  Those whom we do not like, we probably find it difficult to believe that that person was created in the image and likeness of God like we were.  While it is true that we may not "like" everyone, we are still called to "love" everyone.  This is extremely difficult but it is important for us to constantly attempt to do this even if it takes an entire lifetime to master.

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We meet at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Come join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship God together as God's Family.

Feast of Corpus Christi (Transferred), Sunday, May 29th, 2016


If you could choose only one meal, what would that meal consist of?  Like in those old Jimmy Cagney movies where the prisoner gets to choose one last meal.  To me, it is an interesting question to ponder because, let's face it:  I love food.  If I could choose one meal, which one would I choose?  It is a hard decision for me because I would choose so many.  Fried Chicken would probably shoot to the top of the list.  But then again, how about a nice dinner of corned beef and cabbage?  Or how about a dinner consisting of German food?  We all have our own favorites: whether it be Chinese food or Southern cooking or a big fat steak . . . . . . .  the list goes on and on.  The reason I bring up this topic of food and dinners and meals is because in the Sixth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear:  "He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him."  (St. John 6:56)  When talking about food, I don't think very many of us would think of Jesus.  And yet Our Saviour describes Himself in this manner:  "For My flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed." (St. John 6:55)  You see, when we think of food, we base it on how well it tastes and how much we enjoy the food item in that regard.  But, honestly, the real reason for eating is not based solely on enjoyment value.  No, the real reason for eating is so that what we eat can nourish us, sustain us, fortify us, strengthen us.  And in this regard, all of these attributes I just described can be said of Our Blessed Lord as well:  He nourishes us . . . He sustains us . . .  He fortifies us . . . . He strengthens us.  And each and every time we go to church and every single time we receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time, Our Blessed Saviour is strengthening us for the journey ahead.  He is nourishing us so that we can move forward.  He is sustaining us because He is the only one that can truly sustain us.  

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Church on Sunday, May 29th, 2016 as we celebrate the transferred Feast of Corpus Christi.  Join us as we gather together as God's family and listen to God's Word found in the King James version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father and receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And after Mass, stick around and enjoy some delicious goodies at the coffee hour.

St. Margaret Church worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  




Trinity Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

In the Third Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear a conversation between Our Blessed Saviour and Nicodemus.  Now, Nicodemus is asking Our Saviour how someone can be "born again" if they are old.  And Our Lord responds:  "That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit." (St. John 3:1 ff)  Our Lord makes a clear distinction here between what is flesh and what is spirit.  Now, of course, the context of this particular conversation recorded in St. John's Gospel refers to being born again.   Nicodemus was asking for clarification on how someone can be "born a second time."  This is why Our Lord made a distinction between what is "spiritual" and what is "physical."  Sometimes, we as Christians also make this distinction between what is spiritual and what is physical and take advantage of the "difference."  In other words, I have seen people clearly do anything and everything under the sun Monday through Saturday and then they are good as pie on Sunday when they show up for church.  Folks go out and do all kinds of things during the week:  they booze it up; and they cheat other folks; and they gossip; and they sleep around; and they do this, that and the other.  But then on Sunday morning, they wake up; get all gussied up and look all pretty and they head to church.  And they look so pretty and holy in church, you wouldn't know that this was the same person that you just saw at the club the night before.  Now, I am not going to point fingers at anyone else because we are all sinners . . . . . including me . . .  . and we have all done things we should not do . .. . . including me.  But the problem with the picture that I described above is this:  as Christians, we can not divide our time into "Christian-time" (i.e., on Sundays and when we are in church) and "Non-Christian time." (i.e., all the OTHER days of the week).   In other words, some people, as described above , try to do just that:  they convince themselves that as long as they are not in church, they can do anything, and everything, and act anyway they want to act.  They can act "flesh-ly," in other words.  But when they get into church, they have to act "spiritual."  As convenient as this might be for most of us, it just does not work that way.  As Christians, we are to be the same person seven days a week; not just on Sundays.  Now, of course, as mentioned above we are humans and we will make mistakes from time to time but the point is still the same:  we are to think about God; honour God; try to be Christ-like; always do as Christ will have us do SEVEN DAYS A WEEK and NOT only on Sunday!!!!!  

Two opportunities to celebrate Trinity Sunday on Sunday, May 22nd, 2016:

St. Margaret of Scotland Church celebrates at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.

Holy Spirit Church celebrates in the beautiful and historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.  Mass begins at 1:00 PM.

Join us for Mass as we gather to hear God's word.  Join us as we gather as God's family to worship Him.  Join with your brothers and sisters as we all take one hour out of our busy schedules and dedicate that hour to the worship of Our Blessed Saviour!  And then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ, the Good Shepherd Who laid down His life for His sheep!



Pentecost, Commonly Called Whitsunday, May 15th, 2016

In the Second Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, we are presented with a description of what happened to the disciples at Jerusalem during that very first Whitsunday, or Pentecost, when the Holy Ghost descended upon them.  And in that chapter it states that "there were dwelling at Jerusalem Jews, devout men, out of every nation under heaven." (Acts 2:5)  In other words, there were gathered together a diverse group of people from various regions and backgrounds and areas.  When I was preparing my sermon this week and read this, it certainly hit home with me as I reflected on my own life.  This week I celebrated the Twentieth anniversary of my ordination of being a deacon.  And as is so often the case with anniversaries, it caused me to reflect on many memories during those twenty years: many varied parishes in multiple states; many wonderful people and families I have come to know and cherish; many opportunities to minister to God's Church here on earth.  But all along the way and even leading up to my ordination, first as a deacon and next as a priest, my faith was nourished by a wide array of people in my life:  my parents; my grandparents; my uncle; friends; pastors; teachers; etc.   People from a wide array of backgrounds that God used to help nourish me and form me to be the person that I am today.  Just as there were a wide array of people gathered together on that first Pentecost, so too, there are a wide array of people that God uses in our life to sustain us; to nourish us; to teach us.  There are a whole host of people from a wide array of backgrounds that God has used in our lifetime to bring us closer to Him.  And God uses us also to reach out to others . . . if we only allow Him.   The Church is made up of a wide array of people:  sick people; fearful people; sinful people; faithful people; people who are afraid.  The list goes on and on.  But the one thing that each of these people have in common is God.  Put your trust in God and be open to what God has in store for you.  

Two opportunities for Mass as we celebrate Whitsunday on Sunday, May 15th, 2016:

Come join us at St. Margaret of Scotland Church at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us at Holy Spirit Church at 1:00 PM.  We celebrate Mass in the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.

Come join either church as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Hear God speaking to you in Bible-centered preaching.  Join us as we worship God in a traditional setting as God's Family.  And, finally, come and receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.
Fifth Sunday after Easter, Rogation Sunday, May 1st, 2016


If we think back on our life, every single person reading this will be able to remember a time or two where they got themselves into a real jam and needed some assistance or a helping hand.  On the other hand, every single person reading this will remember a time or two when YOU were that person lending a helping hand to a person in need.  I've been the person that needed help; I've been the person that did the helping.  So I have been on both ends of the stick, so to speak.  But the bottom line is this, we have all known people that talked a good game but when it came down to it, their words did not quite equal their actions.  I am sure that all of us can think of a good example of one or two people who talked a lot but when you needed that person, they were nowhere to be found.  Like the old saying goes:  "Actions speak louder than words."   I point all this out to show that it just makes sense to expect people to back up their words with action.  Even St. James knew this and this is why he wrote in the first chapter of his epistle:  "BE ye doers of the word, and not hearers only . . . ." (St. James 1:22)  In the everyday world, if we went to work and had a coworker who bragged and boasted of everything he or she was capable of doing and then did not actually do anything when it came down to it, what would we think of that coworker?  What if you had a friend that you would see every now and then and each time you saw that friend, the friend said "Oh, I got you a nice jacket but I don't have it with me but I'll give it to you the next time I see you." But, as you can guess, the next time you see the friend:  no jacket.  But then the same friend says, "Oh, I got you a really nice book but I don't have it with me . . .  I will give it to you next time I see you."  Again, you guessed it, no book to be found the next time you met this friend of yours.  After a while, if this pattern continues, what will the word of this friend mean?  Nothing.   As human beings, we expect people to live up to their word.  If they do not, their word means nothing.  St. James points out that we put our Christianity into practice by what we do for others, especially the less fortunate.  We don't earn our way into Heaven by what we do.  But on the other hand, the more we do for others . . .  in the Name of Christ . . . .  we show what our Christianity means to us.  And it also shows how much we have learned from the teachings of Our Blessed Saviour.

Two opportunities for Mass on Sunday, May 1st, 2016:

St. Margaret of Scotland Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We meet at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Holy Spirit Church meets every Sunday at 1:00 PM.  We meet at the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.

Join us as we gather to hear God's Word.  Join us as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father and to listen to Him speak to us.  Join us as we gather to receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time in order to strengthen and nourish us.  We use the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  




Fourth Sunday after Easter, April 24th, 2016

My tongue has caused a wide variety of, how shall we say, adventures in my life.  As a priest, I use my tongue to preach about God and use this opportunity to urge people to a greater relationship with Our Blessed Saviour.  It is a great and wonderful honour that priests enjoy when they stand before a congregation to tell them about God.  That being said, my tongue has also gotten me into a whole lot of trouble in my life, it would seem.  I get upset and say things that I shouldn't say.  Sometimes I get an attitude and say sarcastic things that I shouldn't say.  And when the Cubs blow a lead in the ninth inning and lose the game, I certainly say things that I shouldn't say.  Let's face it, I am sure that everyone reading this can say the same thing.  We lose our temper and say things out of anger.  We get frustrated, both with people and situations, and we say things that we wish we hadn't later on.  Even St. James marvels at the little size of the tongue, compared to other parts of our body, and yet, behold all the damage and harm this "little member" can cause:  "Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things.  Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth!"  (St. James 3:5)  Yes, all of us, including me, have seen what consequences occur after we say something that we should not.  

Also from St. James, we hear:  "Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath" (St. James 1:19).  A good rule of thumb, if you will, is to remember that we have TWO ears and only ONE mouth.  Therefore, it is probably a good practice to get into by attempting to listen twice as much as we speak.  This is hard to do, though, quite frankly.  Did you ever notice that even in conversation, very often we are not listening to what the other person is saying to us.  Oh, sure, we are quiet while the other person is speaking.  But instead of actually listening, we are mainly formulating in our minds what we are going to say when the other person stops talking!  We're not really "listening" as much as we're planning on what WE are going to say next!  Unfortunately, our prayer life is often like that as well.  We are not so much "listening" to what God has to say to us, as much as WE are telling God how it should be.  Also, it's hard for most people to listen to God due to all the clamor and chatter from the world around.  Have you ever been in a noisy venue such as a restaurant, a bar, a concert, etc., where you just could not hear the other person talking to you due to all of the "external noise" around you?  It was very difficult to hear what the other person was speaking to you.  This is the same scenario when it comes to prayer, very often.   The world around us is so "noisy" that it keeps us from keeping silent and truly listening to God with no distractions.  The world is full of distractions that prohibit us from truly listening to God and focusing on God as we ought.  

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear the Word of God speaking to us in a powerful way.  Join us as we join together in song.  And join us as we come forward to receive Our Blessed Lord in His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

Two opportunities to attend church on Sunday, April 24th, 2016:

At 9:30 AM, St. Margaret Church gathers together to worship God.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  
At 1:00 PM, Holy Spirit Church comes together to worship Our Risen Saviour.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.



Fr. Todd Returns After "Pulpit Exchange" at St. John's Cathedral, Quincy, Illinois

[Note:  After a week hiatus due to my travel to the Cathedral of St. John in Quincy, Illinois, I would like to take this opportunity to thank Fr. Norman Flowers, who switched places with me and celebrated Mass and preached for St. Margaret and Holy Spirit in Indianapolis on Sunday, April 17th, 2016, while I traveled to Quincy to say Mass and preach at St. John's.  Thank you for traveling from Quincy to Indianapolis and back again.  In that light, I must also thank Bishop Strawn, Fr. Fodor, Deacon Charles, and all the people of St. John's in Quincy, who were so kind to Frances and I on our visit there.  For a priest, it is quite an honour to preach and say Mass in the Cathedral.  Thank you for that opportunity and your kindness.]



Second Sunday after Easter, April 10th, 2016

In both of the readings appointed for today's Mass coming from the Epistle and the Gospel, both readings focus on Our Blessed Lord being the Good Shepherd.  In the First Epistle from St. Peter, we hear:  "For ye were as sheep going astray." (I St. Peter 2:19 ff)  I do not know much about sheep, but I have a bit of experience with cats and dogs and other such creatures in the "household pet variety," and I know that very often you can not find them without going after them.  Alright, in fairness, I'm really talking about cats more than dogs.  Dogs, in my experience, will pretty much come when you call them.  Cats, on the other hand, well .. . . . .  let's just say dogs will come when you call them.  In this sense, in my humble opinion at least, human beings more closely resemble cats.  We do what we want to do, for the most part.  If we set our mind on something, we go and do it.  And oftentimes this leads to us human beings getting into terrible jams.  We have all heard the term, "Curiosity killed the cat."  Well, again, curiosity has done an awful lot of bad things to human beings as well.  So many of us have "gone astray" in our lives at one point or another.  So many of us were as "lost sheep."  But thank God that we have such a loving Saviour that is the Shepherd of our souls!  Thank God that we have the Good Shepherd that is just as concerned as the one lost sheep as He is the other Ninety and Nine.  

Two opportunities for Mass on Sunday, April 10th, 2016:

At 9:30 AM, St. Margaret Church gathers together to worship God.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  
At 1:00 PM, Holy Spirit Church comes together to worship Our Risen Saviour.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield, Indiana.

Come worship at either church.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.


First Sunday after Easter, April 3rd, 2016

We have life pretty easy compared to, say, cavemen.  For example, we sit around and post pictures of cats on Facebook while our ancestors ran around trying not to be eaten by Dinosaurs.  Alright, I'm being a wee bit extreme in my comparisons but in so many ways, life is much easier for us than it was for past ages.  Due to technology, life is simpler, that is sure.  Whether it be travel or washing clothes, we have it so much easier than those that lived in past ages due to technology.  And, yet, life is so difficult for us at times.  Whether it is dealing with other people that don't particularly like us or dealing with keeping up with paying bills that are due.  Whether it is trying to find a job and or dealing with things that break in your house or on your car.  The daily pressures of life seem to be a burden to so many people, especially those who are dealing with sadness, illness, or daily troubles.  And yet we know as faithful, firm, committed Christians, that are answer is right in front of our eyes.   "WHATSOEVER is born of God overcometh the world" (I St. John 5:4)  God is our answer.  This is because God is our foundation in a changing world.  While on the one hand, we do not know what life will give us from day to day . . .  sometimes, it seems to change hour to hour . . . minute to minute . . . . we do know that God will never leave us.  We know that God is always there in our corner.  We know that God is ever constant.  God truly is our foundation.  While we never know from day to day what life will give us, we know that as long as we have God with us we can overcome anything that life dishes out.

St. Margaret Church worships each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  

Come join us and worship Our Risen Saviour!  Hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  And even enjoy some delicious goodies after Mass at the Coffee Hour.  

Easter Sunday, March 27th, 2016

A very happy and blessed Easter to each one of you!  It is interesting to contrast and compare the various events in the Gospels.  For example, if we look at St. John's Gospel, he only has Mary Magadalene going to the tomb by herself after Our Lord had been laid to rest following His death on the Cross.  In St. Mark's Gospel account, though, we hear "WHEN the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the Mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint Him."    When I read this particular verse from St. Mark, I can't help but think of when people say something to the effect of "Don't bring me flowers when I'm dead, bring them to me while I'm alive."  Have you ever heard something along these lines or perhaps maybe you have made a similar statement yourself?  In all fairness, this is a valid point when you think about it.  If you had your choice, would you prefer for someone to show their love to you while you are alive or after you are dead?  I think it is safe to say we would all prefer to be shown the love now while we are still "here," so to speak.  In that same respect, we also should be paying attention to Our Blessed Saviour here and now, right now, while we still have the opportunity.  So often we only go to God when we need something from Him.  We only go to God when we need His assistance.  We only go to God when we are in trouble.  But other than that, we don't have time for God.  We need to make time for God on a daily basis.  We need to find time to pray on a daily basis.  We need to tell God on a daily basis that we love Him.  And, quite frankly, we need to act like Christians on a daily basis  . . . .  and not just when we are in church!  We should never miss an opportunity to show love to those whom we love while they are still with us.  I know in my own life I wish that I could say to my own mother, or my grandparents, for example, how much I love them and just enjoy being in their presence one last time.  But we can do this with God.  Spend time with God.  Go to Him on a daily basis.  Bring your cares to Him.  Bring your worries to Him.  Bring your joys to Him.  Just spend time in His presence.  

On Sunday, March 27th, 2016, St. Margaret and Holy Spirit Churches will celebrate Easter.  There will be one combined Mass on Easter Sunday.  Mass will be celebrated at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please note that we celebrate Mass as we do each Easter up on the Fourth Floor in the "Upper Room."  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Come spend some quality time with God on Easter Sunday.  Thank Jesus for the wonderful gifts He has given you:  namely, forgiveness of your sins and also the gift of eternal life He freely offers to each one of us.  



Schedule for Holy Week, 2016

The Following Schedule will be in place for Holy Week Events:

Sunday, March 20th, Palm Sunday Mass will be celebrated at St. Margaret, Marquette Manor Chapel, 8140 N. Township Line Road, Indianapolis, Indiana.  Palm Sunday Mass begins at 9:30 AM

Sunday, March 20th, Palm Sunday Mass will be celebrated at Holy Spirit Anglican Church, to be held at First Presbyterian Church, 116 W. South Street, (corner of South and Pennsylvania Streets), Greenfield, Indiana.  Palm Sunday Mass begins at 1:00 PM

Friday, Good Friday Service to be held at Holy Spirit Anglican Church at 7:00 PM on Friday,  March 25th, 2016to be held at First Presbyterian Church, 116 W. South Street, (corner of South and Pennsylvania Streets), Greenfield, Indiana.

Holy Saturday, March 26, 2016, A Holy Saturday service with Stations of the Cross will be held at St. Margaret Church, Marquette Manor Chapel, 8140 N. Township Line Road, Indianapolis, Indiana at 9:30 AM.  Please note that the priest will be available to hear confessions from 8:30 AM through 9:15 AM prior to the Stations of the Cross.

Easter Sunday Mass to be celebrated on Sunday, March 27th, 2016 at St. Margaret Church, Marquette Manor Chapel, 8140 N. Township Line Road, Indianapolis, Indiana.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Please note that Mass will be held on the Fourth Floor instead of at the usual place.

Please make note of the above schedule of events for Holy Week and plan to join us at either St. Margaret or Holy Spirit this week.

Fifth Sunday in Lent, Commonly Called Passion Sunday, 
March 13th, 2016

Similar to everyone else, I like to save money where I can.  I suppose one of the ways I "save" money is buying the cheap brands for products when possible.  In other words, why should I pay four or five dollars for a brand-name item when the cheap dollar-store variety works just as well?  I suppose it depends on the product, obviously.  Sometimes this strategy works great and saves you money to begin with.  Other times it may end up costing you money in the long run.  Case in point.  A clogged up sink.  I proposed saving money by buying the "cheap" generic versions of the drain cleaner.  I insisted on buying the "generic" drain cleaners because I could not fathom paying six or seven dollars for a brand-name when I could just spend a buck-fifty and be done with it.  The problem is that the generic version for a "buck-fifty" didn't work so well and I had to repeat the process another two times, still with no success and then ultimately ended up spending the six dollars for the "heavy-duty," "brand-name" drain cleaner and, voila!, drain is cleaned in a snap!  Just like that!  My efforts, though, at the beginning were in vain especially considering I spent money on products that really did not work to begin with, not to mention multiple trips to the store.  Now, my purpose in writing this is not to get people to only buy name-brand products as opposed to cheaper, less-known products.  No, I am just using this as an example of times where we have tried and tried and tried, without success, and then, boom!, we finally succeed with amazing results.  I just used the drain-cleaning example because it came to mind but I know each one of us can come up with our own example of doing something repeatedly without much success and then we end up with amazing results!

In the Ninth Chapter of the Letter to the Hebrews, we are reminded of the sacrifice of bulls and goats made by the high priest in the Temple.  We are reminded in this chapter that if the blood of goats, and bulls and heifers helps to sanctify the "unclean," "how much more shall the blood of Christ" (v. 14) sanctify the unclean?  You see, for countless generations, the high priests would make sacrifices behind the second veil, as we are reminded in this chapter, to atone for the sins of God's people.  As we are reminded, the high priest went in alone to offer up sins for God's people once a year.  But it is the Blood of Christ which turned out to be the ultimate sacrifice.  We can try and try and try to fix things ourselves, but it is only Our Blessed Saviour Who can save us from our sins.  Perhaps you have had the experience of being in a jam and you tried and tried and tried to get things right and it just seemed to get worse and worse and worse.  And then you placed the situation in God's hands and within a short time, you noticed everything got better.   If our efforts are good . . . . Christ's are better.  If the blood of sacrificed goats and bulls is good . . . Christ's Blood is better.  Never fail to put your life in God's hands.  Do your part, yes, but always look to Christ for inspiration.  Always look to God for how to live your life better.  Always look towards the Holy Ghost for inspiration.  Give your life to God and live your life as His servant.    Living life our way may be good but living life God's way is better.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.
Join us for Mass as we gather to hear God's word.  Join us as we gather as God's family to worship Him.  Join with your brothers and sisters as we all take one hour out of our busy schedules and dedicate that hour to the worship of Our Blessed Saviour!  And then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ, the Good Shepherd Who laid down His life for His sheep!


Join us for Mothering Sunday, March 6th, 2016


The Fourth Sunday of Lent is also known as Laetare Sunday. But this Sunday also goes by another name: "Mothering Sunday." Mothering Sunday is the Anglican version of Mother's Day. But in all honesty, we should point out that Mothering Sunday came first. Mothering Sunday came before the "invention" of Mother's Day. Mothering Sunday, you see, was the Sunday in which children who had grown up and left home came back to visit their own mothers and also used that day to visit their home churches. They would bring flowers to their mothers and also leave flowers at the church. So, on Sunday, March 6th, 2016, let's revive this great tradition, this wonderful custom and come to church with our family. Invite your children to join you for church this day. In fact, don't limit it to just your children, how about inviting your friends, your neighbors, your coworkers?

Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday, March 6th, 2016. St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.




Fourth Sunday in Lent, or Laetare Sunday, March 6th, 2016

In the Sixth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear the story of the feeding of the Five-Thousand by Our Blessed Saviour.  But at the beginning of this chapter St. John tells us that there were many people that were following Our Saviour because they saw the miracles that He did.  And then St. John tells us that Our Lord went aside with His disciples away from the multitude:  " . . . . and there he sat with his disciples"  Have you ever had people "latch on" to you.  I'm talking about people that had never shown an interest in you previously and then all of the sudden, you become "popular."  And it suddenly dawns on you that your sudden "popularity" is nothing more than curiosity in something you had done or perhaps you had won something.  You hear this, for example, in people that have won the lottery and all of the sudden these same people become mysteriously "popular" all of the sudden.  Wow, imagine that, huh?  It doesn't necessarily have to be winning the lottery,  You see the same sort of thing when it comes to people in authority or in fame:  such as a boss; or a celebrity; a movie star: a sports star; etc.   When someone is famous or at the top of their game, so to speak, they have all kinds of people close to them, . . .  they have all kinds of "friends" at that point, . . .  they have all kinds of "admirers,"  . . . . . but wait around until something happens and knocks that person out of popularity and watch all of their "friends" suddenly disappear over time.  In essence, this is what St. John is pointing out in the sixth chapter of his Gospel.  He points out that the vast multitude were following Our Lord due to his fame, . . . they were following Him due to the miracles they heard He performed, . . . they were following Him to a large degree so that they could see what all of the fuss was about.  

Today, two-thousand years later, it really isn't that different, when you think about it.  For the most part, the world doesn't care much about Jesus . . . they don't think much about Him on a daily basis . . . they certainly don't make an effort to follow His teachings . . .  the world, in general, doesn't make a point to spend time with Jesus at all . . .  that is, until they need something.  Once someone gets into trouble, or they get into a jam, they run to Jesus and implore His help.  They go to Jesus and ask Him to help them out of their jam that they suddenly find themselves in.  Now, don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with going to Jesus when you are in need, when you have trouble, when you have difficulties.  There is no better person to run to at that point.  But my point is don't ONLY go to Our Blessed Saviour when you are in trouble like so many people.  They only go to Jesus when they need something, or need a miracle, or need help.  Spend time with Jesus every single day.  Spend time in the presence of Our Blessed Saviour on a daily basis.  Make Him the center of your life.  Be a disciple of Jesus and not just someone interested in "miracles." 

St. Margaret of Scotland Church gathers every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Please join us for Mass.  Take time out of your busy schedules to worship God.  Listen to the Word of God through the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  And receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.


Mothering Sunday, March 6th, 2016

Especially in our American society, we are all familiar with "Mothers Day," which takes place in May.   But are you familiar with "Mothering Sunday?"  Mothering Sunday is an Anglican tradition that is actually much older than "Mother's Day" and is held on the Fourth Sunday of Lent.   This year it falls on Sunday, March 6th, 2016.  For centuries it was custom for people to return home to their ‘mother’ church on Laetare Sunday – and to bring flowers to their mother and or leave the flowers at the church.  You see, as children grew into adults and left home to find work elsewhere . . . the tradition or custom began by returning home on the Fourth Sunday in Lent / Laetare Sunday to return home and visit their mothers.  An important part of this day was to also visit their home churches.  Thus, it became a day for the family to spend time together and for the family to attend church together.  

Why not celebrate "Mothering Sunday" this year by inviting your children, your loved ones, your relatives, and even your neighbors to attend church with you?  We invite our loved ones to a host of activities:  dinners; sporting events; movies; etc.  How about inviting your loved ones to church as well?  Invite your loved ones to attend church as a family so that you can worship God together; to listen to the Word of God; and to receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  

"Mothering Sunday" will take place on Sunday, March 6th, 2016.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at St. Margaret Church, which worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Celebrate "Mothering Sunday" by inviting your loved ones to attend church with you.  



Third Sunday in Lent, Sunday, February 28th, 2016

Do you ever have trouble driving early in the morning or early evening when it starts to go from dark to light or from light to dark?   I am talking about that "in-between" point where it's not quite dark and it's not quite light.  It's almost as if you can see things, yes, but there's doubt about what you are seeing.  I guess the same thing may be true when you are out driving and it is foggy.  You think you see something off in the distance . . . . but you are not quite sure . . . is it or isn't it?   I am sure you can all think of an example of what I am talking about, a time or two where you thought you saw something but you were not quite sure because of the darkness or because of the fog.  I am thinking about this because last week or the week before it was so foggy and it was hard to see off in the distance early in the morning.  But as I was struggling to see off in the distance due to the fog, as the sun rose up, it was almost as though the fog instantly disappeared.  It literally like moving from dark to light instantly.  I remember literally struggling to see off in the distance one second and everything was clear the next.  Of course, for Christians, Our Blessed Saviour is the light of the world.  He is our light.  He gives light not only to the world but He gives light to our personal journey as well.  As we hear in the Epistle appointed for today's Mass:  "For ye were sometimes darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord . . ."  (Ephesians 5:1 ff)  St. Paul explains that prior to knowing Christ, we were struggling to find our way in the dark.  Just like in the haze or the fog, we were not quite sure of what was ahead.  But Christ gives light to the darkness of the world.  And when Christ is in us, we shine forth the light of Christ to the world around us.  During this holy season of Lent, hang on to Christ.  Make Him the most important part of your life.  Dedicate your life to Christ and allow Him to brighten the darkness that this world can only offer.  

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is offered every Sunday.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join your brothers and sisters in Christ as you worship your Heavenly Father.  Pray for the descent of the Holy Ghost to enter you and give you knowledge about God.  And, then, receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Saviour Jesus Christ at Communion time to strengthen you, nourish you, and fortify you.

St. Margaret worships every Sunday at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.




Second Sunday in Lent, Sunday, February 21st, 2016

I have owned pets for the better part of my life.  I have owned cats . . .  . dogs . . . lizards . . . reptiles . . .  hamsters .. . . gerbils . . . birds . . .  not all at the same time, mind you.  Pets are great.  They are a lot of work but they provide much love and a lot of comfort.   I have noticed with pets . . . . especially the dogs . . .  they like to beg for food.  As soon as you sit down to eat, you see those very attentive eyes staring up at you, not blinking, not moving, just staring at you to see what you are eating and see if you "drop" anything.   They seem to be satisfied with any scraps coming from the table.  They just wait for anything that may find its' way from the table to their mouths.  Those little tails start to move around as soon as they see something coming their way.  They are content with anything at all that comes their way as long as they get something.  

In the Fifteenth chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear the story of the woman of Canaan seeking a cure on behalf of her daughter.   But Our Lord did not answer her a word as St. Matthew tells us.  But this did not stop the determined mother.  She started in on the disciples.  In fact, she started bothering them so much that they soon went to Our Lord to get Him to listen to her for no other reason than so she would leave them alone.  Our Lord finally did speak to her but He seemed to give her the "cold shoulder."  At first He stated to the Canaanite women that He was "sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel."  Next, He told her that it was not "meet to take the children's bread, and to cast it to the dogs."  To this, she responded that at least "the dogs eat from the crumbs which fall from the table."  If her determination was not by itself impressive, her final response was enough to convince Our Lord of this woman's humility and faithfulness.

The Canaanite woman responded by referring to the dogs eating of the crumbs falling from the table.  How many of us are satisfied with the "crumbs" that fall our way?  How many of us are satisfied with the left-overs that we have?  How many of us are content with the second best?  So many people satisfy themselves with a wide multitude of things in this world.  Some people satisfy themselves with drink or drugs.  Other people content themselves with money or riches.  Others crave after material possessions such as fancy clothing or video games or technological gadgets.  But do any of these things truly satisfy us?  No matter what we can think of, none of them last.  If it's a car, for example, eventually it will break down or rust away.  Same thing with a computer:  it will eventually break down and you will need to get another one.  Clothing will either wear out or go out of style.  No matter what you can think of in this world, none of it compares to a relationship with God.  In that sense, the things of this world are like "crumbs."  We are like the little dogs content with the crumbs falling from the table.  Wouldn't we rather have something more nourishing, . . . more satisfying . . . longer-lasting?  That is a relationship with Our Blessed Saviour.  All else pales in comparison.  Nothing satisfies in this life like a relationship with God.  So many people in this world spend their time chasing after things that seem so worthwhile to them at the time.  And yet nothing is truly everlasting . . .  nothing except the love of God.  God's love never disappoints.  God's love never ends.  God's love never falls short.  Stop chasing after the "crumbs" of this world.  Stop being content with just "crumbs."  Have a relationship with God.

Join us for Mass on Sunday, February 21st, 2016 as we celebrate the Second Sunday in Lent.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Lord and receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

 
First Sunday in Lent, February 14th, 2016

While on Sunday, February 14th, many people will be celebrating the "secular version" of St. Valentine's Day . . .  giving cards . . . . and chocolates . . .  and roses . . .  and taking your sweetie out for a romantic meal somewhere  . . . the Church will be celebrating the First Sunday of Lent.  Lent officially begins on Ash Wednesday and thus begins this holy journey towards Easter.  On this First Sunday, we read about Our Lord's forty days in the wilderness in the Gospel of St. Matthew:  "And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred." (St. Matthew 4:1ff)  Now, it certainly stands to reason that Our Lord was hungry after not eating for forty days and nights.  To be honest, I get hungry after not eating for forty minutes, let alone forty days and forty nights.  As human beings, we do become hungry if we do not eat for any extended period of time.  And if you are like me, if it has been a while since you have eaten . . .  once you do get something to eat, the food tastes so good, doesn't it?    But this is not only true physically in regards to feeding ourselves.   Human beings also hunger spiritually.   Just as we \need to nourish ourselves physically with food, we also need to nourish ourselves with spiritual things.  We know on a physical level that if we do not eat for any extended period of time, our body is affected physically.  But the same is true spiritually speaking as well, we are affected.  If we go for long periods of time without receiving spiritual nourishment, we will be affected as well:  we may become distraught . . . sad .  . . angry . . . our consciences may fail us as in we don't acknowledge right from wrong or totally ignore right from wrong . . . etc.  Make no doubt about it, just as the body needs to be nourished with food, so too does our spirit need to be nourished.  And we get spiritual nourishment by spending time in prayer .  .  . reading the Word of God . .. . attending church on a regular basis (not just when we feel like it!) . . .  availing ourselves of the Sacraments such as receiving Holy Communion, going to Mass, making our confession, etc.  If we focus on the "spiritual" and put emphasis on the "spiritual" during the next forty days, we will be better prepared for a good and holy Easter.  We will be better prepared spiritually to celebrate the Glorious Resurrection of Our Blessed Saviour as we celebrate Easter!  

Please join us for Mass.  Take time out of your busy schedules to worship God.  Listen to the Word of God through the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  And receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

St. Margaret of Scotland Parish worships every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.


Quinquagesima, or the Sunday before Lent, February 7th, 2016


Personally, I have been in the "preaching business" going on a good while.  I have been doing this for going on thirty years now, if you go back to my seminary years.  I love to preach, quite frankly, which is amazing considering that I am a quiet, reserved person otherwise.  But I love to preach about Our Lord is the bottom line.  I love to tell people about God and the love that He has for all people.  I love to inspire people in my own way to have a personal relationship with Our Blessed Saviour.  I preach with the intent of leading others closer to God.  And like many preachers throughout the world . . . and throughout the ages, quite frankly,  . . .  I use Holy Scripture as the "foundation" of my sermons.  I preach using the Word of God, first and foremost.  Sadly, not all preachers I have heard preach use God's Word in their sermons.  Many I have heard were wonderful preachers.  Many I have heard gave marvelous presentations.  Many preachers I have heard over the years, they were indeed a joy to listen to.  But every once in a while, it's time for the preacher to quit "beating around the bush."  You see, I speak about God in every one of my sermons.  And with the help of God, I think I do a fairly decent job through His guidance and inspiration.  But now is the time to have a "Let me be clear" moment as some politicians like to use that term when they speak.  

Let me be clear:

Jesus Christ is indeed my Lord and my Saviour.  Jesus is indeed the "Light of the World."  There is no salvation outside of Jesus.  He is the One sent from the Father to save us from our sins.  God offers each one of us salvation and this was afforded to each one of us by Our Blessed Saviour dying on the Cross for our sins.  He took the burden of our sins upon His own shoulders because He knew we could not bear the weight.  And He took our place on that Cross.  He hung in our place on that hill at Calvary.  It was you and I that should have been hanging there.  But Our Blessed Saviour took our place and hung there and died there for us.  He was truly the Lamb of God, the innocent Lamb Who was slain for our sins.  I believe in the same Lord and Saviour who said:  "I am the Way, the Truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by Me."  (St. John 14:6)  I believe in the Holy Trinity:  the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.  I believe that Our Lord founded the Church to do His work here on earth.  And I believe as Our Lord promised that the Holy Ghost was sent to the Church and helps to inspire the Church.  I pray that I always stay close to the Sacred Heart of Jesus because it is there that the love of God can be found.  It is there that salvation is freely given and offered.  And it is there that the love of mankind God has for us is to be found.  

There, I hope I was clear.  As Christians, we are called to tell the world about God.  I firmly believe that we tell the world not only verbally but also we tell the world about God through our actions.  And although we are not perfect in conveying that truth:  whether that be through our words or through out actions.  We are still obligated to tells others about God.  Let each one of us be clear in our faith.  Let each one of us be firm and committed.  Let each one of stay close to the Sacred Heart of Jesus.  Let each one of us show no fear in letting the world know that Jesus Christ is indeed our Lord and Saviour.  Let each one of us know that Our Lord is indeed the Way . . .  the Truth  . .. . and the Life.  

St. Margaret of Scotland Church gathers together every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road.

Join us as we gather together as God's family to:  hear the Word of God; listen as God speaks to each one of us in our hearts; worship God in song and in word; listen to the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer; and, finally, receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion so that we can be nourished for the journey we call life.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule to worship God, to honour God, to acknowledge the need for God in your life.


Sexagesima, or the Second Sunday before Lent, 
Sunday, January 31st, 2016

In the eighth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour tell the Parable of the Sower.  And in this parable, Our Lord tells the story of the sower who goes out to sow the seed:  some seed fell along the way; some seed fell on rocky soil; some seed fell on good soil; etc.  Our Lord, upon telling the parable, tells what the parable means to the disciples.  But in the parable, there are different types of people represented:  those that hear the Word; those that do not hear the Word; those who pay attention for a time and then fall away; etc.  It reminds me as well as the many types of people we encounter in our lifetime.  Some people we encounter are just that:  people we encounter.  Nothing more, nothing less.   While others become friends due to common interests or similarities.  Out of these, some friends become life-long friends, and others (through moving away; or getting another job; or going to another school; etc.) move on and we lose contact with.  

There are a variety of people in our life, and many of these people, I am convinced that God has placed them in our life to inspire us, to strengthen us, to encourage us, to be with us.  Obviously, many of these people placed in our life are related to us by blood:  our parents; our grandparents; aunts; uncles; cousins; etc.  Other people such as a spouse or  good friends, for example, God may have placed them in our lives to give us support along the way.  Each one of us can point out special people in our lives who have supported us or inspired us along the way.  I, for my part, can certainly point toward my parents; my grandparents; wonderful, inspiring priests who have blessed me with the Sacraments; I can point to wonderful friends who have been there for me.  Each one of these people, I am convinced that God has placed those special people in my life to encourage me along the way.  These people have touched my life.  They have played a part in forming the person I have become.  Certainly, as a priest, I can point towards many wonderful members of churches I have served who have been a wonderful inspiration to me.  God places special people in our life to assist us and to inspire us.  Let us always remember the fact that for others around us, we may be the one that inspires those around us.  You may be the special person that God has placed in that person's life to inspire him or her.  Let us always remember to inspire others to greatness.  Let us always remember that for the dedicated, committed Christian, we have the potential to be the "Face of Christ" in the world.  Let us never forget that God uses us as His instruments in this world to let others know about Him.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is a traditional Anglican parish, which uses the Anglican Missal and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We also use the King James Version of the Bible.  We believe strongly in Our Lord's words . . .  "this is My Body and this is My Blood" . . . and truly believe that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar and we receive Him at Communion time.  Come join us every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Blessed Lord.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Septuagesima, or the Third Sunday before Lent, 
Sunday, January 24th, 2016

"Anything worth doing is worth doing well."  That's an old saying that you will hear said every once in a while.  But, let's face it, if the value is greater to us personally . . . . whether that "value" be in money, or time, or prestige, etc. . . . . we will put more effort into doing that particular thing, whatever it is.  If you are a student, for example,  and you have a quiz worth five percent of your grade or if you have your semester final worth forty percent of your grade: which one are you going to put more effort into studying for?  Case in point.  Recently the Powerball Lottery went to over One Billion dollars for the jackpot.  Can you imagine winning ONE BILLION DOLLARS?!?!?  And if you are like me, you saw people standing in line to buy lottery tickets for the chance to win the billion dollar lottery of a lifetime.  But that's my point, people who never bought any lottery tickets; or people who rarely bought lottery tickets, suddenly found themselves standing in line  to buy a chance to win a billion dollars.  If the "reward" is greater to us, we will put more effort into something.  If the "reward" doesn't mean that much, we won't spend as much time on it.  That's just human nature, I'm afraid.  

In St. Paul's Ninth Chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians, St. Paul writes the following:  "Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible."  He is referring to athletes training for sporting events who train as hard as they can to win a crown to signify that they are the best athlete.  St. Paul, of course, compares an athlete's training to a Christian's "training."  St. Paul compares and contrasts how hard an athlete trains to win a "crown" that will eventually fade away, i..e, the corruptible crown.  But, for the firm, committed, dedicated Christian, we are training  to win a crown that will never corrupt.  We are training to obtain a crown that we will never lose.  In other words, we are training to win eternal life with Our Blessed Saviour.  In comparing/contrasting the two "crowns," St. Paul is asking the question to the Corinthians:  which "crown" is more valuable?  The crown won for winning the sporting event?  Or the crown won for being a good and faithful servant of God?  The answer is obvious for St. Paul.  But is it so obvious for the rest of us?   How much effort do we put into our jobs on a daily basis?  How much effort do we put into fixing up our homes?  How much effort do we put into our hobbies?  How much effort do we put into watching our favorite television programs or sporting events?  Now, again, don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with any of the things mentioned above.  But, again, we put effort into things that are important to us.  We put the most effort into things that have the most meaning to us.  And this is the point that St. Paul is making:  if God is important to us . . .  if God means something to us . ..  if God has real meaning and real value to each one of us . . . . then we should make a point to put effort into spending time with God on a daily basis:  through prayer and meditation; through daily reading of Scripture; and dedicating our lives to God through having a personal relationship with Our Blessed Saviour.  We run a race as well.  For us, our "race" is called life.  A "crown" awaits each one of us, if we choose it:  the "crown" of eternal life.  But we have to start training for it now.

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We meet at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Hear what God is speaking to you in Bible-based preaching.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule for the week and dedicate that hour solely to God.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  Give of yourself to God and realize that God is giving of Himself to you when you come to church.





Second Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 17th, 2016

In the very first chapter of the Gospel of St. Mark, we hear the story of St. John the Baptist.  St. Mark is quick to point out that St. John the Baptist was expected to appear before the Messiah when he writes:  "Behold, I send my messenger before thy face . .  . " (St. Mark 1:2)  Of course, this is a reference to the Old Testament passage coming from Malachi 3:1:  "Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me."  "Prepare."  "Preparation."  Our life is filled with  all sorts of "getting prepared."  Preparation is something we do on a daily basis,  in ways in which we may not even think about because we do it so often.  For example, we prepare ourselves when we take a bath or shower in the morning.  We prepare ourselves to go out by getting dressed.  We prepare our meals.  In winter, we prepare our homes and our cars by "winterizing" them.  Reports have to prepared for work.    When Mass is celebrated, we have to prepare the altar by putting up the altar cards; place the altar linens on the altar; place the ribbons in the missal; the priest has to get vested; etc.  Everything in life has to be prepared, it seems.  

St. John the Baptist prepared the way of the Lord.  As both St. Mark and the prophet Malachi stated, St. John was a messenger for the Lord.  He prepared the way of the Lord by announcing Our Lord's imminent arrival.  St. John prepared the way of the Lord by letting the people know about the goodness of God.  St. John prepared the way of the Lord by telling the people to repent their evil ways.  We, too, are called to prepare the way of the Lord just like St. John the Baptist.  As I say so often in my sermons, Our Blessed Saviour founded the Church to do His work here in this world.  In the past, people viewed "the Church" as being only the bishops, priests, and nuns.  And everybody else just sat back and did "their own thing."  But we know now that every member of the church:  bishop, priest, religious nun or brother, and all the lay faithful are members of the Church.  As such, whether someone is ordained or a lay-member, everyone is expected to do their part by "preparing the way of the Lord."  We all do this in our own ways.  

We are all given gifts and talents.  Each one of us have been given a unique talent.  Obvious talents that people would think of would include: being a musician, being a teacher, able to preach inspiring sermons; etc.  But we don't have to preach a powerful sermon in front of a church-full of people in order to tell people about God.  For preachers, they preach their sermons on Sunday.  But for the rest of us we have the opportunity to preach sermons every day of the week.  For most people, they preach their sermons, though, by the ways in which they lead their lives . . .  by the way that they treat people . . .  by the way in which they show compassion to others . . . by the way in which they show love.  St. Francis said:  "Preach the Gospel at all times and, if necessary, use words."  All of us are called to prepare the way of the Lord and we all must do it in our own way.  Ask God to show you, to guide you, to inspire you.  And then go and inspire others to a closer relationship with God.

Join St. Margaret Church on Sunday, January 17th, 2016 as we celebrate the Second Sunday after Epiphany.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  


St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is a traditional Anglican parish, which uses the Anglican Missal and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We also use the King James Version of the Bible.  We believe strongly in Our Lord's words . . .  "this is My Body and this is My Blood" . . . and truly believe that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar and we receive Him at Communion time.





First Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 10th, 2016

Have you ever noticed when a teacher is checking to make sure the answer is correct, the teacher will not only look at your answer, but will also want to know how you got  the answer?  In other words, the teacher wants to check what path you took to know the answer to the question.  I remember when I was young, going to elementary school, I remember asking the teacher how to spell a particular word and the teacher would respond:  "Look it up in the dictionary."  How are you going to look up a word in a dictionary if you don't know how to spell the word, I would wonder.  Well, the answer if obvious.  A good teacher will not only provide you with an answer but will provide you with the knowledge and the know-how to obtain an answer.  A good teacher, in other words, teaches you how to find out the answer to a question instead of simply giving you the answer.  This is because often times, in life, there are different ways to find the answer that we are looking for.

In the Second chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear the story of when Our Blessed Saviour was left behind in the Temple.  And St. Luke tells us that when Our Lady and St. Joseph returned to Jerusalem to find their Son, they found the Divine Child in the Temple, "sitting in the midst of the doctors, both hearing them, and asking them questions." (Chapter 2:46)  After Our Lady approaches her Son and tells Him that they were worried and looking for Him, the Divine Child responds:  "How is it that ye sought me?"  (Chapter 2:49)   As pointed out above, a teacher may ask the path you took to find the answer.  Our Lord often asks us the same question.  He wants to find out what path we took to find Him.  So often in life, people look for God in so many different places.  Sometimes the path we take to find happiness takes us down a wrong path.  Sometimes we end up feeling lost and miserable.  Often, when we think we have found happiness, we end up not feeling as satisfied as we thought that we were.  As a Christian, we realize that God is our ultimate happiness.  Other things that we think will bring us happiness and joy . . .  whether it be drink, or drugs, or money, or wealth, or honor in the eyes of the world . . . these things only give us contentment for a time.  God, we know, gives us everlasting contentment.  St. Augustine teaches that in trying to find joy and fulfillment, we are really searching ultimately for God.  Because he states that all things that we think will bring us satisfaction will ultimately fail us.  Only God brings everlasting joy and contentment.  What path have you followed to find God?  Have you searched for Him in your longing to find joy and contentment in earthly possessions?  Things of the world never bring everlasting joy.  Only a true, dedicated, committed, personal relationship with God will bring us true satisfaction.  Give Him your heart.  Make Him the King and Ruler of your life.

St. Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship Our Blessed Lord at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.   Come join us for Mass as we worship together as God's family.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule and step out of the business and rush of the rest of the week and use this quiet time to spend time with God . . .  hear His Word . .. . and receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament.




Second Sunday after Christmas, Sunday, January 3rd, 2016

I have no doubt whatsoever but I am convinced that everyone goes through the same, exact struggles at the beginning of a new year:  remembering to write the new year and not the old year.  Just now, for example, when I began to type the headline of this little essay, the part where I put the date, I began to type "2015" instead of "2016."  I hear a lot of people complain about this same phenomenon at the beginning of a new year so I guess I am not the only person afflicted by this ailment at the beginning of every year.  Obviously, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out why this is a problem.  We do it because we are "creatures of habit."  We do things over and over again and get in a groove, so to speak, of doing it that way.  Writing down a date at the beginning of a new year is a very simple and obvious example, but let's face it, there are other things that we get into habits of doing:  getting up at a certain time; driving to work a certain route; etc.  Each one of us can come up with our own list of examples but each one of us has certain things that we are accustomed to doing and it is difficult to ever try to break those habits.   

Having a relationship with God is, for most of us, just another habit.  For many of us who go to church, for example, we may go to church on a regular basis simply because we were raised that way and it has been what we have always done:  we get up on Sunday morning; get dressed; and go to church.  No more, no less.  Now, for many, for this same group just mentioned you might factor in the fact that we were taught this by our parents because they went to church every Sunday.  Now, don't get me wrong, this is actually a good reason for going to church.  It's good to get taught this habit by our parents.  All habits are learned, whether they be "good habits" or "bad habits":  e.g., smoking; eating healthy; cursing; exercising; etc.  So even if what is described above in regards to going to church every Sunday, even if it is a "habit," then it is a "good habit."  But this is not the best reason for going to church:  simply because it is a "habit," albeit it is a "good habit."

Going to church and having a relationship with God is something much more than simply a habit.  It is a way of life.  It is a commitment.  Having a relationship with God is a dynamic, life-changing, ongoing event in our lives.  Knowing God should be the reason for our very existence.  Having a relationship with God should be our motivation for getting up each day.  Being in love with God is something that we should proclaim:  not only through our words; but also by our actions; and they way in which we regard others.  And once we realize this, once we take our relationship with God seriously, we can not help but radiate the holiness of God through our lives.  In the book of the Prophet Isaiah we hear: " . .  . because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek."  (Isaiah 61:1)  God has anointed each one of us to preach about Him.  God has anointed each one of us to have a relationship with Him.  God has anointed each one of us to grow in love with Him.  And yet not everyone does.  This is because most people don't heed the call because they are too concerned with the ways of the world.  For others, the devil has convinced them that they are not worthy to do the "things of God."  By our own merit, none of us is worthy; but with the help of God, He is our sufficiency.  He gives us strength where we are lacking.  Make God a priority in your life in 2016.  Make God more than just a "habit."  Make Him the very reason for your existence . . . .  because He is and He is worthy of your faithful, committed love.

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

   Join us as we take time to listen to the Word of God; to hear what God is saying to each one of us.  Worship God is traditional worship.  Receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.




Feast of St. John, Apostle and Evangelist, 
Sunday, December 27th, 2015

Did you ever hear the expression:  "You are like an open book;" or "Your life is like an open book?"  I say to my wife frequently, "I know you like a book."  In other words, when I tell my wife this saying I am telling her that I know her.  I know what she is most likely going to do in a given situation.  I know what she is usually thinking.  I know what she likes and doesn't like.  It means that I know her so well, she is similar to a book that I have read numerous times over and know what the book is about and how it ends.  "I know you like an open book."  On December 27th, the Church celebrates the Feast of St. John, Apostle and Evangelist. The Gospel appointed for this Sunday is the final chapter of the Gospel of St. John . .. . the Twenty-First Chapter . . . . and the end of the Gospel goes as follows:  "I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written."  (St. John 21:25)  Of course, St. John is referring to all the things that Our Blessed Lord did during His life time that were NOT written about.  In other words, his meaning is that if every single thing that Our Blessed Lord did during His life time was written down, there would not be enough room for all the books necessary for such an undertaking.  I suppose that the Evangelist was correct.  You see, there were many things written about in the Bible that Our Lord did during His lifetime:  His preaching and teaching; His miracles; His interactions with people; the places He visited and traveled to; etc.  There are a LOT of things that Our Lord did that we can read about in the Bible.  But what about the ways in which Our Blessed Saviour has affected your life?  How about how He has affected my life?  What about all the ways in which Our Lord has influenced the world in the two-thousand or so years since Our Lord walked the earth?  Each one of us, I suppose, if we sat down and put pen to paper .  . .  . . or fingers to keyboard . . . .  could each one of us write down an entire book on how Our Blessed Saviour has worked in our lives.  But, of course, we would have to take notice and try to remember all of the details before we could attempt such an undertaking.  A good biographer has to get all the details of a person's life before that person's biography can be written.  Thus, it is good for each one of us to reflect on how God has influenced our life; how He has affected us; how He has guided us; nourished us; strengthened us; sustained us.  How has God influenced your life?  God knows us like an "open book."  He should . . .  He created each one of us.  But the question is, do we know Him?  The only way to be sure of this is to get to know God in a personal way; read Holy Scripture on a daily basis; pray often and frequently; and try to be the person that God wants us to be.

There are two opportunities for Mass on Sunday, December 27th, 2015:

At 9:30 AM, St. Margaret of Scotland Church will celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

At 1:00 PM, Holy Spirit Church celebrates Mass at the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street, at the corner of South and Pennsylvania Streets in Greenfield, Indiana.

Come join us as we listen to the Word of God preached from the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Listen to what God has to say to you.  Received the life-giving Precious Body and Blood of Our Lord at Communion time.  And share an hour out of your life with your brothers and sisters in the Lord in giving proper worship to Our Heavenly Father.

Fourth Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 20th, 2015


It just seems to make common sense that you have to have all the parts in order to make something complete.  For example, if a bike is missing the wheels . . . .  it is incomplete.  How frustrating would it be to work on a 5,000 piece puzzle and discover some of the pieces were missing?  Or if you are in the kitchen, how are you going to prepare something if you do not have all of the ingredients?  I might have it in my mind to bake a cherry pie but what if I do not have any cherries for my cherry pie?  Again, it only makes sense that we must have all the parts or all the ingredients on hand if we are going to make something.  In essence, St. Paul is saying this to the Philippians in the fourth chapter of that epistle when he writes:  " . . . . but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made know unto God." (Philippians 4:6)  When it comes to prayer, very often we are missing some of the elements. Many people only pray when they need something.  Many of us only go to God when we are in need of a favor from Him.  And it is fine to go to God when you are in need of something . .. or in trouble . . . or in need of mercy . . . . after all, God is our loving Father and He wants to be there for His children.  But, that being said, we should not ONLY approach God solely when we need something.  That would be the equivalent of a neighbor who won't give you the time of  day but will only come to you when they need something.  Or having a relative that never contacts you except when they need to borrow some money.  We need to go to God in prayer not only when we need something from Him.  This is what St. Paul is saying.  We need to also praise Him when we pray.  And we certainly need to pray in Thanksgiving when we pray.  In other words, we need to thank Him for the many blessings He bestows upon us during our lifetime.  "Let us come before His presence with thanksgiving; and make a joyful noise to Him with psalms."  (Psalm 94:2)  Christmas is the season of giving.  Let each of us focus on giving more time to God.  Let us dedicate more prayer time to God.  Do not let the fast pace of the world and all the being busy in life keep us from approaching God.  Let us take time each day from our busy lives in order to dedicate that time solely to God.  

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, at 8140 N. Township Line Road.  

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Listen to what God has to say to you through the liturgy and the Bible-based preaching.  Worship God in traditional worship and receive Holy Communion so that you can be nourished and strengthened.

Third Sunday of Advent (Gaudete Sunday), 

Sunday, December 13th, 2015

Have you ever been overjoyed by something and before you knew it, the joy had worn off?  Or the joy that you had experienced had certainly lessened.  As children, especially at Christmas time, we are overjoyed at what Santa Claus will bring us.  We anxiously look forward to all the presents under the tree and try to figure out what is wrapped inside.  Or it could be the case as you had gotten older and you decided that you just had to have the latest electronic doo-dad or perhaps it is some clothing item such as a new dress or a fancy pair of boots.  And so you save your money and finally go and make your purchase and you are overjoyed at what you have obtained.  But then after a while your joy lessens because after a while your attention is turned toward the next "item" that you have set your sights on acquiring.  Let's be honest, whether as children or adults,  . . .  whether it is a gift given to us or something we have purchased ourselves  .. . .  whether it is an actual physical product or whether it is simply a good meal that we look forward to devouring . . . . the point is the same:  things of this world do indeed bring us joy for a time but then the joy eventually fades.  Even if you look at it from the perspective of someone who turns to drink or drugs to find their "happiness,"  . . . . what happens when the effect of either drink or drug wears off?  That person goes back to feeling like they did before.  The "high" feeling . . .  the "drunk" feeling only lasts so long.  Things of the world . . .  whether they be electronics .  . . or food . . . . or clothing . . .  or positions of honour . . . . or titles at our jobs . . . or booze  . . . . or drugs . .  . all these things only bring temporary fulfillment.  They do satisfy, yes, but only for a time.  The joy we find in them  is only temporary, never lasting.

For the Christian, on the other hand, the joy that is everlasting is our relationship with God.  "Rejoice in the Lord, O ye righteous, for it becometh well the just to be thankful." (Psalm 33)  Our personal relationship with Our Blessed Saviour will never disappoint.  Our personal relationship with Our Lord and Saviour is one that will last an eternity.  While other things in this earthly life will fade away . . .  or be consumed . . . or rust away . ..  or go out of fashion . . . . the relationship that God offers to us is forever.  God will always be faithful to His people.  "Gaudete in Domino semper" ("Rejoice in the Lord always")  (Philippians 4:4-5)  Rejoice in the fact that God loves you!  Rejoice in the fact that God sent His only Son to die for you!  Rejoice in the fact that God offers you the possibility of eternal life!  Give your heart to the One that offered His Heart to you!  Give your life to Our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, and rejoice in the Lord always!

The Third Sunday of Advent is referred to as "Gaudete Sunday."  And this is because "Gaudete" is the Latin word for rejoice, which comes from the first word of the introit, "Rejoice ..  . . "  As such, the Church is past the midway point of the season of Advent, and we use this opportunity to take a breather, so to speak.  Remember, the season of Advent is supposed to be somewhat somber in nature . .   . this is why the liturgical colour during this season is violet or purple as it is in Lent.  But today the Church lightens its' mood just a bit and rose coloured vestments can be worn instead of violet for today.  

Join St. Margaret church on Sunday, December 13th, 2015 as we celebrate the Third Sunday of Advent, Gaudete Sunday, at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  





Second Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 6th, 2015


It seems as though one week can not pass for me without someone pointing to all the tragic events happening in the world and making some sort of comment about how we are close to the end of the world.  Certainly, when you think of the past tragic events such as the killings in Paris and now the killings in California; when you think about events such as plane crashes, earthquakes, floods, etc. that you hear about in the news.  When you hear about things such as mentioned above, it is certainly understandable that people would think about Our Lord's words:  "AND there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity . . . "  (St. Luke, Chapter 21)  Now, in all fairness, there have been tragic events in ALL the eras of human history.  There have been earthquakes . ..  . famines . . .  death  . . . . sickness . . . . wars . . .  etc.  throughout all of history at one point or another.  And the fact that there have always been tragedies, both global and personal, makes it obvious that we should always be prepared for the Second Coming of Our Blessed Saviour.  

Advent reminds us of that fact.  Advent provides us a time to remember and to prepare our hearts.  Advent is the season of preparation . . . . it is the season of waiting . . .  it is the season of hope.  The "spirit of Christmas" has sort of taken over Advent.  In other words, we spend the weeks before Christmas going to "Black Friday" sales and buying the latest doo-dads.  We "shop til' we drop" and focus all our energy on getting the best deals.  All the while we fight traffic, fight the crowds, fight the other shoppers, fight the sales-clerks to use coupons for our purchases.  We run from one place to the next place and try to fit in errands in between.  We wrap presents and put the tree up and decorate the tree.   Now, don't get me wrong, all of what I just mentioned is wonderful . . .  all except fighting the traffic, that is . . . . but as Christians we are always called to put everything into perspective and for us, God always takes priority.  He is the true reason for the season.  And the reason for the season of Advent is to await the coming of the Christ-Child into the world on Christmas morning.   Anything that takes our attention away from focusing on God needs to take "second place."  God should always take the top priority in our life.  

Let us spend the next three weeks placing special emphasis on our relationship with God.    Let us spend the next three weeks waiting for the Christ-Child.  Let us spend the next three weeks preparing a special place in our hearts for the Divine Child Jesus.  Let us try to focus less on the shopping and the wrapping and the Christmas parties these next few weeks.  Let us focus more on awaiting the Coming of the Saviour into the world.  Let us prepare our hearts for His arrival.  

Mass is celebrated each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Worship Our Heavenly Father with us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  And after Mass is over, please stay for some delicious refreshments at our coffee hour.





First Sunday of Advent, Sunday, November 29th, 2015

Let me preface what I write to say that I lost my dear mother this week.  She passed away from this life on Thanksgiving morning.  Thus, Thanksgiving 2015 has been a very emotional day for me, to say the least.  The fact that I lost my beloved mother on Thanksgiving itself did encourage me to give thanks for her life and the life that she gave to me.  But more important than the actual life she gave me, I am thankful for the love that she showed me all of my  . . . ahem . . .  39 years here on this earth.  You see, I can only speak from my own point of view . . .  I can only speak on behalf of myself . . .  I can only tell you things from my perspective . . .  but in my case, my mother always showed me love; always supported me; and she loved me unconditionally.  My mother was to me what a parent should be:  someone who loved; encouraged; and supported.  She was there for me my whole life.  We hear so many stories, whether they be in the news-media or from people that we know, about parents who do not show love as they should.  But my mother was certainly not one of those.  She showed love to me my entire life.  And in that last sentence, I emphasize the "showed" part.  Why do I say that?  Why do I emphasize that?  Because my mother was very quiet when it came to her emotions.  My mother was very soft-spoken when it came to voicing her opinion or her emotions for that matter, but she showed her love for me through her actions.  She showed me that she loved me by being there for me.  I never had any doubt as to whether or not she loved me.  I knew that she did.  She proved her love not by what she bought me but how she was there for me.  I always knew that my mother loved me by the quiet support she always showed for me, no matter what.  I knew that my mother loved me by the way in which she loved me day in and day out.

St. Paul says in the thirteenth chapter of the Epistle to the Romans:  " . . . .  for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law"  (Romans 13:8) Our Blessed Saviour gave clear direction that we should love one another:  "A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another." (St. John 13:34)   It is certainly not easy to show love at times.  It is difficult to show love in the face of disrespect, for example.  It is certainly not easy to show love when there is disappointment.  It is difficult, to say the least, to show love when we faced with burdens and obstacles: whether these be physical; emotional; or mental.  And yet love can overcome any burden.  Love can overcome any obstacle.  Love is what a parent does and what a parent shows.  Love is what we show to one another in times of difficulty or emotional distress.  Love is not defined by what we give to a person.  Rather, love is defined by how we treat a person.  My mother and my father, for that matter, defined love by giving of themselves to me and not what they bought for me.  God also calls us to love, . . .  to give of ourselves . . .  to love one another  . . .  as He has loved us.

St. Margaret meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to each one of us in His Precious Word.  Come receive nourishment and strength as Our Lord fortifies you with His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Come dedicate an hour out of your week to God alone.  Give Him that hour and dedicate that time to Him.  He has given so much to you . . . . can you not dedicate one hour to Him?



Sunday Next Before Advent, Sunday, November 22nd, 2015

The Gospel for today's Mass is taken from the Sixth Chapter of St. John's Gospel.  In the passage chosen for today's Mass, we hear St. John's version of the feeding of the Five-Thousand.  Now, keep in mind that Our Lord asked Philip where they could  get so much food to feed all of those people.  In essence, St. Philip protested that it would be impossible to feed so many people.  St. Andrew stepped in and reported that a "lad had five barley loaves and two small fishes."  But even St. Andrew himself immediately responded:  ". . . . but what are they among so many?"   Have you ever had the experience where you took evaluation of the situation and talked yourself out of doing it even before you gave it a try?  In other words, you convinced yourself that it would never work and so you refused to even try it.  You defeated yourself even before you started.  That's why I say so often in my sermons that we are our own worst enemies.  We stop ourselves from even giving it a try because, in our own mind, we are convinced that there is no way in the world it will work.  And so we stop even before we begin.  In today's passage, St. Philip immediately protests that they can't feed that many people and he only came up with  a protest.  St. Andrew at least made an attempt but even he second guessed his efforts and questioned how little food that was compared to how many people were present.  

As evidenced in all the miracles we read in the Gospels, Our Blessed Lord shows time and time again how He changes the "ordinary" into the "extraordinary."  Our Lord demonstrates that He can accomplish anything He sets His mind on.  As Christians, we are called to place our trust in God.  This is not always easy, is it?  As human beings, we want to do things our way.  As human beings, we have doubt if something is going to work or not.  As human beings, we lack confidence, or knowledge, or know-how.  It could be any number of reasons or combination of reasons.  But the fact remains that as Christians we are called to place all our trust in God.  "Let go and let God," as the old saying goes.  Give your life to God.  Place your life in His hands.  Let God be the Lord and Master of your life.  And turn your cares, and your burdens, and your troubles over to Him.  This is not to say that you will not have cares and burdens and troubles in your life.  But when you do, . . . . you will have God with you . . . . to guide you, to lead you, to be next to you.  If Our Blessed Saviour fed the five thousand with just a few fish and loaves, I am convinced that He can perform multiple miracles in your life as well.  

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Church on Sunday, November 22nd, 2015 as we celebrate the Sunday Next Before Advent.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

If you have not done so lately, invite someone to church with you.  Invite a family member, a dear friend, a neighbor, a coworker.  Invite someone to come to church with you.  Let them experience the blessings of hearing the Word of God.  Allow them to experience the blessing of being in fellowship with fellow-Christians gathering together as God's family.  Let them experience the blessing of receiving the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Invite someone to church with you.  





Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland (Transferred), 
Sunday, November 15th, 2015
Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity

So often in life instead of focusing on what we actually have . . . . we focus on obtaining the things that we do not have.  We get fixated and focused on obtaining things that we want to have or desire to have.  While growing up, I remember that I wanted a specific bicycle and I remember clearly thinking in my mind that if I got that certain bike, I would be totally happy and everything would be perfect.  Well, to make a long story short, I did get that bike and it wasn't too awfully long until my mind shifted to the "next item" that would make my life "complete!"  As adults we still do the same thing, don't we?  If it's a certain pair of boots or jeans; If it's the latest electronic gadget or video game; if it's the latest innovation that we have seen advertised on TV; whatever it is, don't we think our life will be  somehow "complete" if we just obtain this one item that we are focused on at that particular time in our life?

In the Ninth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear the story of the ruler whose daughter has died approaching Our Lord to seek the healing of his daughter.  But on the way to this ruler's house, a woman also seeking healing touched the hem of Our Lord's garment which He was wearing.  In so doing, she was completely healed of her condition.  After finding our who touched His hem, Our Lord responds to her:  " . . .  thy faith hath made thee whole ." (St. Matthew 9:17 ff)   Wonderful items such as electronics . .  . . or clothing  . .. .. or boots or shoes   . . . .  or a job which we want. ..   or whatever you can think of  will not make us complete.  They will not make us whole.  These things bring happiness and contentment for a certain period of time but this happiness soon wears off until we move to the "next" item that we "just have to have."   Our faith in God is something totally different, though.  Our faith in God truly does make us whole . . .  it makes us complete . . .  it brings us true, lasting happiness.  Our relationship with Christ is one that we should focus on obtaining.  Giving our heart to the One Who gave His heart to us should be where we concentrate our efforts on.  It is understandable that as human beings we focus on obtaining material things.  This is what human beings do.  But as Christians we are called to put things in a proper perspective and place God first in our life.  Just like Our Lord told the woman that touched the hem of His garment, " . . . . thy faith hath made thee whole. . .. .," we also know that in our lives, the love of God and following Him is what makes us whole.

St. Margaret of Scotland will celebrate the transferred Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland, our patroness, on Sunday, November 15th, 2015.  St. Margaret Church worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.

Come join us as we hear the Word of God found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  Listen to the Word of God preached to you and hear what God has to say to you.  Receive the Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And then join us after Mass for our coffee hour where you can enjoy many delicious treats and wonderful fellowship.





Twenty-Third Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, November 8th, 2015

In the Third Chapter of the Epistle to the Philippians, St. Paul reminds us that our true citizenship is not hear on earth:  "For our citizenship is in heaven" (3:17 ff)  For the Christian, this is always important for us to make note of.  It's easy to forget, quite frankly, if you ask me.  Why do I say that?  We have a tendency as human beings to focus on the "here and now."  In other words, we focus on what is affecting us right here and right now.  If a bill comes due first, we focus on that specific bill and leave the others for later.  If we have a particular report due in two days at work, we worry about the report that is due next week  later.  We may need to paint the bathroom but first we need to take care of the broken faucet in the kitchen,  etc.  In a general sense, we human beings since we live in the world we focus on the things of the world:  satisfying our desires; paying the bills; putting a roof over our head; etc.  And all of these things are perfectly understandable but St. Paul is giving us a good reminder that while, yes, we are human beings and we have to focus on the "here and now" of this life, we also have to take care of our other citizenship as Christians.  As mentioned above, so often we go from project to project just trying to take care of what needs to be taken care of immediately or what needs to be done now.  And everything else can wait.  When it comes to being a Christian, though, this can not wait.  Being a Christian takes effort.  Being a Christian takes patience.  Being a Christian takes practice.  " . . .  our citizenship is in Heaven," St. Paul reminds us.  And, as such, we need to see the world and approach the world through the eyes of Christ.  This is difficult at times because the human side of us wants to only focus on "us:"  my needs . . .  my desires . . . . my wants . . . .  Even in dealing with others, we want things our way.  And yet if we are to be true, committed, devout, practicing Christians, it is not our will that needs to be done, it is the will of Our Heavenly Father that must take priority:  "Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven."   We are dual citizens . . .   of earth and of Heaven . . . . but our first allegiance is to God as Christians.  This is easy for us to remember when we are in church on Sundays but it is sometimes easy to forget when we are out in the "world," at our jobs, at the store, stuck in traffic, etc.  

Join us on Sunday, November 8th, 2015 as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

St. Margaret Church meets every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.





All Saints, Sunday, November 1st, 2015

Let's face it, in the secular society in which we are all a part of, Halloween has become a staple of life this time of year.  I read an article last year stating that money spent on Halloween related items . . . . whether it be costumes, or candy, or decorations, etc. . . .  . has sky-rocketed to Number Two right behind Christmas.  What does this have to do with the feast of All Saints, you are probably asking.  Well, our secular version of Halloween sprung up out of "All Hallows Eve," in other words, the day before All Saints Day, November 1st.  And the only reason we are pointing out this fact is to ask the question:  how many people in our secular society know anything about All Saints Day and yet they all know about Halloween?     Halloween comes and goes.  And yet each one of us is called to be a saint.  A saint, you see, is someone who has given their life to God. A saint is someone who has dedicated his or her life to God.  A saint is someone who,  despite all the struggles in this earthly life, has said to themselves, to God, and to the world that God is "Number One" in their life.  In that sense, the saints are a role model to all dedicated, committed Christians throughout the world.  And this is why the Church celebrates the feast of All Saints every November 1st:   to celebrate those who have fought the battle and have won the prize!  Of course, that prize is eternal companionship with God in Heaven. 

 So many people do not care about becoming saints, quite frankly, because in their own mind they do not consider themselves to be "worthy" of becoming a saint!  They look at the other examples of the saints:  St. Peter; St. Paul; Our Blessed Mother; St. Augustine; St. Monica; St. Gemma; etc., etc.  These people look at the lives of the saints and they see extraordinary people doing extraordinary things.  And they quietly tell themselves that they could never be like that; they could never be holy like that; they could never do extraordinary things like the saints have done.  Thus, we defeat ourselves even before we begin and we never even try.  if would only stop to remember that we are the "ordinary" and God is the "extra."  And when you put the two together, that is how we get the "extraordinary!"  That may seem very simple, but quite frankly, it is as simple as that:  the saints are ordinary people just like you or me but with the help of God, they became extraordinary in their faith.  They were willing, they were committed  . . . . and God provided the rest.  

Dedicate your life to God.  Stay committed to becoming a saint.  Make God the top priority in your life.  And let God provide the rest.  Soon, you will see how extraordinary your life will become.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Church on Sunday, November 1st, 2015 as we celebrate the Feast of All Saints.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  

Join us for Mass where you can hear the Word of God preached, where you can dedicate yourself and your week to God, where you can spend quality time in reverent worship with your Brothers and Sisters in the Lord, and to receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion to nourish you and give you strength to carry on.

Reign of Christ the King, Sunday, October 25th, 2015

There are a lot of different kinds of rulers in the world.  In our own country, we have at the national level, we have a president, and we also have senators and representatives.  At the state level, we have a governor for each state plus each state has their own state senators and representatives.  Plus, there are mayors, and city council members, board of education, etc.  The list goes on and on.  In our country, we seem to have a whole lot of people who rule over our lives to one degree or another but we don't have a king in this country.  We have politicians who think they are the king . . . .  but that is a different sermon.  

On the last Sunday in October, the Church celebrates the Solemn Feast of the Reign of Christ the King.  This is an important feast for Christians to ponder because it raises an important question:  Who is your king?  We all have bosses of one sort or another.  If it is at work, our boss may be a manager or a supervisor.  If it is at home, our boss may even be our spouse.  For a priest, the boss is the bishop . . . . and the vestry . . .  and the altar guild . . . and the music committee . .  . . and the people in the pews!  You see, priests have a LOT of bosses!  Well, all of us have a lot of bosses: whether it be politicians or supervisors or bishops or spouses.  But to a certain degree, quite frankly, our bosses are the ones we choose to be bosses.  In other words, if push comes to shove we can always quit and find another job if we truly do not like our supervisor.  In the case of politicians, if you don't like the job they are doing, vote them out of office.  You get the idea.  To a large part, we pick those who are in charge of us.  

Keeping this in mind, we also choose who is our king in the spiritual sense.  We know what God has done for us but it is always good to be reminded:  "He has delivered us from the dominion of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son"  (Colossians 1:12 ff)  God has sent His Only Begotten Son into the world to save us from our sins.  God has redeemed us by the Sacrifice on the Cross.  God deserves to be our King.  And yet only we can make Him our king.  Our Blessed Saviour is, first and foremost, a gentleman.  He never forces Himself on anyone.  He waits for us to approach Him.  It is up to us to make Him the King of our life.  It is up to us to make the decision.  It is up to us to live in His Kingdom.  In St. John's 18th Chapter, we hear the dialog between Pilate and Our Blessed Lord:  "Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then?"  Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king"  (St. John 18:33 ff)  We too are called to say that Jesus is our King.  After careful consideration, each one of us should address Our Blessed Saviour as He truly deserves to be addressed:  Christ Our King!  Each one of us has the power to choose who our leader is.  As faithful Christians, we should always make the point to acknowledge Christ as the King of our life!

St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located as 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship.





Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 11th, 2015

In the epistle designated for the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, we hear from St. Paul's fourth chapter of his Letter to the Ephesians.  In the beginning of this chapter, St.  Paul writes:  "I therefore . . .  beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called." (Ephesians 4:1)  Those who are called to be Christians are called to be something truly noble.  That may sound very lofty but it is true. This is because we are called to imitate "light" in a world of "darkness."   This is not very easy at times.  In fact, it's a pretty tall order if you ask me.  But that being said, St. Paul goes on to give some pretty sound advice in this fourth chapter of Ephesians.  In verse 31 of this chapter he writes:  "Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice." (Ephesians 4:31)  Probably, I would dare say, this is the best advice of the whole chapter for us to keep in mind.  I say this because we live in a fast paced world.  I would say this is true for all of us.  Whether we are working or retired; whether we live in cities or in towns; whether we are young or old.  Just about everybody I know . . . . myself included . . .  is constantly busy at doing this or doing that.  Going to work.  Going to doctor's appointments.  Going shopping.  Cleaning the house.  Fixing the house.  Doing yardwork.  Picking up the kids.  Going to games.  The list goes on and on.  And, unfortunately, for many of us . . . .  again, myself included . . . . busy schedules oftentimes lead to stressful living.  And stressful living can lead to short tempers and lack of patience with those around us.  We get angry with the idiots that cut us off in traffic and almost cause a wreck.  We get irritated with the people in front of us at the store who are holding up the checkout line by trying to use coupons that have been expired for five months.  We get mad at people who may have a different opinion than we do.  The list goes on and on.  And while these things may seem insignificant in and of themselves, added all together these things have the potential to make our lives very stressful.  

God does not mean for our lives to be filled with stress and anger and irritation.  Quite frankly, when we get irritated with someone or something . . . . even if we are correct to be irritated . . .  this irritation does not harm the other person;  it harms us.  The other person probably doesn't even know of our irritation and probably wouldn't care anyway even if they would know.  The irritation and the anger and the bitterness is what builds up inside of us and harms us. Period.  St. Paul is warning the church at Ephesus just like he is warning us two-thousand years later:  be filled with things of God instead of things of the world.  Fill yourself with the love of God so that you will not be filled with the anger and bitterness offered by the world.  In a certain sense, we are similar to a pitcher or a glass or a box.  If the container is filled with whatever objects we can think of and the contained is filled to the brim, we can not fit anything else in.  Thus, remove the items from the container so that we can fill the other items in there.  Thus, in that sense, how can we expect to fill ourselves with the love of God if we are already filled with anger and bitterness and hate?  Conversely, how can anger and bitterness and hate fill us if we are already filled with the love of God?

St. Margaret of Scotland Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to Holy Scripture, hear the Word of God preached, and receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.  A Coffee Hour follows Mass.




Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 27th, 2015

In the fourteenth chapter of his Gospel, St. Luke kindly reminds us of the time that Our Blessed Saviour went to the house of one of the leading Pharisees to eat.  We are also told that this took place on a Sabbath day.  Now, as a result, Our Lord was closely observed and every word He uttered was carefully examined by those present.  Now, all of this conversation led ultimately into the conversation about  importance and exaltation in the eyes of the world.  Our Lord gave the example of being invited to a very great feast and He warned those listening not to assume that they should take the seat of most importance because they may be embarrassed greatly when asked to sit somewhere else.  Rather, Our Lord stated, take the lowest seat and then if it is meant for you to sit at a seat of great importance, you will be bidden to do so.  

In the story cited above, Our Lord ends it by saying:  "Because every one that exalteth himself, shall be humbled; and he that humbleth himself, shall be exalted." (St Luke 14:11)   Now as with all things we always have to be careful that we are doing things the way that God would have us do.  I state this because we are humans and, as such, we usually want to have things done our way.  Secondly, the ways of the world are very appealing and it is easy for us human beings to fall into the ways of the world and doing things the "world's way," so to speak.  We are reminded elsewhere in Scripture to "turn the other cheek."  Even when we do that, so often, in the eyes of the world, you see, that is taken as a form of weakness.  Everything depends ultimately how you see the world and your role in it, quite frankly.  For the devout, committed Christian, we are called to do the will of God here in the world.  This takes patience, endurance, and a surety that we are doing what God would have us do.  Even when we do the right thing, we will often be mocked or questioned.   When Our Lord stated that those of us who humbleth ourselves will be exalted, He was referring to our exaltation when we get to Heaven to spend eternity with Our Heavenly Father.  Let us not get so fixated on the riches and glory of this world, because the riches and glory of this world are passing away and will pass away.  So many people judge their success by the standards of the world.  We Christians are called to judge our success by whether or not we have served God faithfully.  Riches will come, riches will fade away.  Health will be with us and sickness will come as well.  We will enjoy times of ease and will also endure times of misery.  But whether we are rich or poor; whether we are healthy or sick; the one constant through all these "ups" and "downs" in life will be our relationship with God.  Serve God faithfully.  Have a relationship with Him.  Grow each and every day in your faithfulness to God and always remain faithful to Him.  

Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, September 27th, 2015 at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Join us for Mass where you can hear the Word of God preached, where you can dedicate yourself and your week to God, where you can spend quality time in reverent worship with your Brothers and Sisters in the Lord, and to receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion to nourish you and give you strength to carry on.



Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 20th, 2015


I am sure that each one of us has had the occasion in our lifetime where we were overjoyed that someone dear to us made the point to visit us.  Perhaps out of the blue, someone quite dear to us made a unexpected visit to our home.  Maybe it was a family member who lives far away or an old classmate from school.  Maybe it was someone who you had know years and years ago but through time, unfortunately, you had lost contact.  I personally have had the good fortune of being contacted  and surprised via email by friends that were so dear to me but through time we had lost contact.  It was so wonderful to hear from them and to catch up on old times.  Of course, as a result it brings back many wonderful memories perhaps long forgotten.  So whether it is in person, via telephone or via email, when someone dear to us makes a point to visit us, it helps us to reflect on how special that person is that visited us but also how much we mean to that person as well.  Obviously, the person that contacted us would not have made the extra effort to contact us if they did not want to.  It makes us feel appreciated and loved, when someone makes a point to visit us or contact us.

In St. Luke's Seventh Chapter, the people from the city of Nain must have felt in awe of the visit that Our Blessed Saviour made to their city.  Upon entering the city, Our Lord witnessed the funeral procession of a young man being buried by a widow.   As St. Luke reminds us, Our Lord was moved with compassion and brought the young man back to life.  The people who witnessed this were certainly astounded, as we would all be, to witness such a miracle.  "And there came a fear on all:  . . . .  That God hath visited his people" (St. Luke 7:16)  The people of Nain . . . certainly the young man which was brought back to life and his mother, first of all . . .  were astounded as the miraculous sights they saw that day.  They were wise enough to realize that God had indeed visited their town that very day.  Similar to the people of Nain, we need to be able to recognize the miracles that God has done in our life.  We need to recognize the miracles that God has done for each one of us as well.   And once we recognize the fact that God has touched our lives in a whole host of ways, I am sure that we will be similarly astounded that "God hath visited His people."  God has visited us.  He has blessed us in ways that we never even imagined.  But it is the time to realize the many wonderful things that God has done in our life.  It is the time to realize that God has blessed us and to acknowledge the blessings and to acknowledge that God has visited His people and continues to visit His people.

St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located as 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship.



Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 13th, 2015

It just so happens that I am writing this on the September 11th anniversary.  To look at the various pictures, to hear the sound bites, and to read about what happened on that fateful day fourteen years ago still affects me and brings back vivid memories of a tragic day that can never be erased by time or distance.  Surely, those in New York City; Washington, D.C.; and Pennsylvania were affected in a horrific way, but whether you were in California . . . or Texas . . . or Minnesota . . . or anywhere else for that matter, you were affected that day as well.  I can only speak for myself but I remember that tragic day like it was yesterday.  As events unfolded, I did not know the magnitude of the events as they were happening.  So many questions . . .  so few answers . . .  so many emotions . . . so many tears . . . September 11th, 2001 touched not only our nation, but the world quite frankly.    We truly were witness to the acts that evil men can accomplish to satisfy their hatred and anger.  The whole world was witness to pure evil on September 11th.   And as tragic as that fateful day was, in the days that followed we witnessed the heroism, courage, bravery, and fortitude of those affected.  We heard the stories of determination in the face of pure evil.  We heard the stories of bravery and courage in some of the darkest hours our country has ever seen.  And we also heard the stories of compassion coming from those who wanted to do their part to bring about healing to those were were hurt physically and hurting emotionally.

I can not help but also reflect on the lives of all those poor souls who died on that fearful day and the fact that for them September 11th was no different than any other day:  September 10th . ..  September 9th . ..  etc.   For the thousands and thousands that made their way to work that morning, I am sure that each and every one of them went through the same, exact motions that they had went through on a thousand days just like it:  wake up; take a shower; get dressed; get some breakfast; get some coffee; fight traffic; listen to the morning news; etc.  And yet despite the fact that the usual morning routine had been accomplished just like it had been thousands of mornings before this . . .. despite this fact, 9/11 would turn out to be a day like no other.  For some, sadly, it would be their last day.

  Our Blessed Saviour spoke the following words:  "Therefore I say unto you, Be not anxious for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on."  (St. Matthew 6:25).  I am sure that so many who died on that horrible day fourteen years ago were anxious about many things:  getting up on time; getting ready; finding the right outfit to wear; anxious about the morning rush hour; getting to work on time; getting the reports ready that needed to be accomplished; etc.  And so many of us today are still anxious about so many of these same things.  We get anxious about life in general.  And yet Our Blessed Saviour is telling us to not be anxious about what we shall eat . . . or what we shall drink . . . or what we shall wear . . .  or life in general.  None of us knows when our time is up.  None of us know what tomorrow brings.  None of us knows.  And so we need to live our life today.  Live life today.  So many of us are so worried about tomorrow, we miss out on today.  Don't let this be the case with your spiritual life.  Don't plan on having a spiritual life down the road or sometime in the future.  Have a relationship with God today.  Don't worry about your anxieties in regards to tomorrow.  Enjoy your blessings today.  "But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and His righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.  Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."  (St. Matthew 6:33-34)

Please join St. Margaret and Holy Spirit Churches on Sunday, September 13th, 2015.  Please note that there will be only one Mass celebrated on this day.  The members of Holy Spirit Parish in Greenfield will join the members of St. Margaret Church on Sunday, September 13th at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father and listen to His Word found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we gather together as God's family to dedicate this time to Him.  And, finally, gather with us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Jesus at Communion time to strengthen and nourish us.  








Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 6th, 2015

In a strange, ironic twist the term "Thank You" is simultaneously one of the "most used" and "least used" terms we have.   On the one hand, think about how many times you say "Thank you" on a daily basis.  When you go to the store and buy something, for example,  you probably say "Thank you" to the cashier or clerk.  If you sneeze and if someone says "God bless you," I bet you respond "Thank you."  At your job, if a coworker and/or a customer gives you something that you ask for, I am sure you respond "Thank you."  I am sure that if we were to try to count how many times in a given day that we used the term "Thank you," I am pretty sure that we would utterly amazed how often we say that specific term:  "Thank you."  On the other hand, how often do we say "Thank you" for the things that we really ought to say "Thank you" for?  The prime example, of course is expressing proper thanks when we are given a gift.  Some people are incredible when it comes to sending out "Thank you" cards, for example, when they receive a gift.  Others, myself included, are not so good at this practice.  Whenever we receive something from someone, whether the item be great or small, we should always be in the practice to say two simple words:  "Thank you."  

As an aside, I am continually amazed when I am out in the public and I do not see someone put the practice of saying "Thank you" into use.  For example, have you ever gone into or perhaps come out of a store and you took the time to hold a door open for someone, and the person did not say "Thank you" or acknowledge you at all.  Even in traffic, have you ever let someone ahead of you that wanted to get over into your lane.  Often, the person will wave or acknowledge your kindness as a way to say "Thank you."  I notice big semi truck drivers will blink their flasher lights on and off as a way to say "Thank you."   What happens if someone does not "wave" or acknowledge your letting them ahead of you?  If you are anything like me, you mumble to yourself sarcastically, "You're welcome!"   The bottom line is we like to be thanked for what we do for people.  We like for people to acknowledge what we have done for them.  Whether it be a simple act of holding open a door or giving a gift to a loved one, it is only right to receive thanks for what we did.  

In the Seventeenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear the story of Our Blessed Lord  heal a group of ten lepers.  Now keep in mind that all ten men were healed but only one of them made the point to come back and properly thank God and acknowledge the healing that he had received.  "And one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, and with a loud voice glorified God, and fell down on his face at his feet, giving him thanks" (St. Luke 17:11 ff)  But Our Lord pointed out that while this man did give proper thanks and acknowledgment for the healing that he had received, He went on to question where were the other nine???  You see, God likes to be acknowledged as well for the blessings that He bestows on His children.  Our Lord was happy to bestow blessings as we saw in today's passage with the healing of the ten lepers.  But on the other hand He showed disappointment when only one out of the ten came back to given proper thanks.  We should always make a point to give proper thanks to God for the blessings He has bestowed on each of us.  Very often, we do not take the time to thank God and acknowledge His blessings because we are too busy concentrating on what is wrong in our life.   

Join us on Sunday, September 6th, 2015 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the 14th Sunday after Trinity.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road  on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Listen as God speaks to you directly.  Worship God by taking one hour out of your busy week and dedicate this hour to God.  Let God reward you by giving you His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.   





Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 30th, 2015


Everyone loves to get presents, don't they?  But have you ever noticed that it is even nicer to give a present to someone we love?  It might be for a special event such as a birthday or a graduation.  Or it might be for no reason at all.  The fun is in giving the item to our loved one and see the joy in their face as they open their gift.  I have had occasions where I have seen something that made me think of the other person and I just HAD to buy it for that other person.  And then I can't wait to give it to them because I just knew how much they would love it.  You can tell when someone loves their gift, can't you?  You can see it in their expression, in their face, you can hear it in their words, you can feel their excitement.  

In the Tenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, St. Luke reminds us that Our Lord is speaking privately to His disciples when He tells them:  "BLESSED are the eyes which see the things that ye see: for I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them" (St. Luke 10:23)  In essence, Our Blessed Saviour is telling the disciples of the wonderful gift that has bestowed on them:  that they have seen the long awaited Messiah with their own eyes.  As Our Lord stated, prophets, kings, people from all stations of life have been praying for the day in which they see the Messiah but they now see Him with their own eyes.  "Blessed are the eyes which see the things that ye see!"   Our Lord could be saying that very statement to us as well.  Our eyes are blessed to have seen what we have seen.  You see, we have witnessed God at work in our own lives.  We have seen the blessings He has bestowed on us throughout our entire life.  We have been witness to God's love being bestowed on us on a daily basis.  

Sometimes we don't appreciate what we have.  That old saying goes something like:  "You don't appreciate what you have until you lose it" or something along those lines.  Sometimes we have been given a gift that we don't fully appreciate.  When it comes to things of God, I don't think it is the case that we do not appreciate the blessings.  In my opinion, I think it would be more accurate to say that our attention is focused on other worldly things such as possessions and material things.  We get distracted by the things of the world, in other words.   We get too caught up in our ways of the world and leave God behind.  It's almost as if we leave God wrapped up in a nice box and keep Him up on the shelf just in case we need Him.  But Jesus is telling the disciples and He is reminding us as well:  "Blessed are the eyes which see those things that ye see!"  Make a point to see the ways in which God has worked in your life.  Make a point to search for God.  Make a point to consider carefully all the ways in which God has blessed you throughout your life.  We have been blessed by God in more ways than we will ever know.  But until we make a point to acknowledge those blessings, those blessings that God has given us will continue to be unnoticed and/or unappreciated.

Please consider joining us for Mass.  Come hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Consider setting aside an hour of your week where you can dedicate that time solely to God.  Come hear the Word of God.  Listen to God speaking to you directly and hear what He has to say for YOU!  Receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time to be strengthened and nourished for your journey!

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.





Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 23rd, 2015

Humility is a very good thing.  I have learned that lesson (and re-learned it!) the hard way.  Very often it seems that when my head gets too big  . .  .  and I get full of myself . . .  . without fail, it seems at that point that I do something stupid and I get knocked back down to earth.  Perhaps that has happened to you a time or two.  And at that point, we just stand there and shake our head and say to ourselves:  "why in the world did I do that?"  There is nothing wrong with being confidant in ourselves or in our ability.  There is nothing wrong with even being proud of what we have done or what we have accomplished in life.  But as with everything, even this must be done with moderation, number one, and for the Christian, an understanding where our strength comes from.  St. Paul wrote in the Second Letter to the Corinthians:  "not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think any thing as of ourselves"  And then he goes on to emphasize the point:  " . .. . but our sufficiency is of God. . . ." (2 Corinthians 3:4)   St. Paul wanted to remind the Church at Corinth that if we have riches, it is because God provided those riches;  if we have abilities or strengths or skills, it is only because God has provided each one of us with what we are good at; if we have a roof over our head and food on our table every day, it is because God provides.  Our Heavenly Father provides for all of His children.  Those who are practicing, committed Christians acknowledge this fact.  But, quite frankly,  sometimes we forget or over look that fact.  You see, it's difficult sometimes for us to always acknowledge God as we should because, quite frankly, we get all caught up in our busy schedules, our busy life styles.  This is why I always emphasize that relationships take effort.  You have to work at a relationship.  In a relationship, we have to make time for our loved ones.  In a relationship, we have to make time for those we love.  We have to make a point to show love to those whom we love.  This is true of our relationship with God as well.  We have to make a point to acknowledge the gifts that God have bestowed upon us; we have to show God and tell God how much we love Him; and, finally, we have to spend time with God every day.  Many of us have the tendency to only go to God when we need help with something.  Make a point to go to God every day.  Speak to God every day.  Tell God how much you love Him every day.  And, finally, take a lesson from St. Paul and never forget that our sufficiency is of God.  Acknowledge the fact that everything we have:  our life; our knowledge; our strengths; our health; our possessions . . . .  everything we have is made possible by our Heavenly Father.  Give Him thanks and show Him love on a daily basis.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  

Join us for Mass as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to each one of us.  And, finally, join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.






Feast of the Assumption (Transferred), 
Sunday, August 16th, 2015

I am sure each one of us has met someone who, despite all else, always seems to be joyful no matter what.  Have you ever met someone who, despite everything else, always seems to be happy?  Whether it be a close relative or loved one; a neighbor; a coworker; or someone who helps us at the store we shop in.  All of us have met someone who always seem to be joyful no matter what.  That is because joy is something that is found "inside" of us and not "outside" of us.  This distinction may seem somewhat strange but let me clarify what I mean.  So much of the world find their "joy" on things that are "outside" of us.  In other words, they find their joy in material possessions such as cars, or clothing, or electronics, or money, etc.  But these things that I just described can be taken away from us.  They can be stolen, or they can break,  or they can go out of style, etc.  Contrast this with joy that is deep within us.  This joy is inside of us.  This joy is found in our heart.  This joy can NEVER be taken away from us, no matter what.  It can not be stolen from us or taken away from us . . .  it will never break . . . . and it will never, ever go out of style.  A joyful person will not let the obstacles of the world get in the way of their joy and happiness.   

If we look back to the Old Testament book of Isaiah, we hear the following:  "I will greatly rejoice in the Lord, my soul shall be joyful in my God" (Isaiah 61:7ff)  Our Blessed Mother is just such a person.  Despite all of the hardships she endured, despite all of the questions that she had, despite even the sorrow she had when she saw her Son beaten and killed, she still had the joy of God in her heart.  This is the lesson that Our Lady, and all of the wonderful saints, quite frankly, can teach us :  that joy is a condition that is found  inside of us and can never be taken away.  When we have the joy of God in our hearts, it can never be stolen; it will never rust away; it will never wear out.  The joy that God gives to us grows stronger and stronger as we mature, (mature physically, yes, but more importantly, mature spiritually!)  And true joy in God becomes a strong foundation that will never be shaken no matter what befalls us.  Thus, even when bad things happen (e.g., we get sick, we have stacks of bills, we lose our job, etc), our foundation of joy in God will always overshadow everything else that may befall us.  The love of God that we have in our hearts is something that comes from within us and "spills out" over into the rest of our life and this is what people describe as "joy!" 

St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Just go to 86th Street,  west of St Vincent Hospital and turn south on Township Line Road and Marquette Manor is on the west side of the street directly across from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Join us as we listen to Holy Scripture, hear the Word of God preached, and receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.  A Coffee Hour follows Mass.

Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sundays.







Tenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 9th, 2015

St. Luke tells us of Our Lord's triumphal entry to Jerusalem in the Nineteenth chapter of his gospel.  Now, keep in mind that all four of the evangelists tell about this event in their respective gospels but in St. Luke's Gospel, we hear something that is not found in the other three.  ". . . he beheld the city, and wept over it " (St. Luke 19:41)  In other words, St. Luke is describing the fact that as Our Lord beheld the great city of Jerusalem, as He saw it, He began to weep, . . .  . He began to cry.  Now we cry for a multitude of reasons, don't we?  We can cry out of sadness.  We can cry out of frustration.  We can cry even when we are happy . . .  they are called "tears of joy."  Our Lord was crying for all of the above reasons, it seems to me.  He was crying because He was sad.  Sad at the fact that the people wasted so much time and energy on useless pursuits instead of pursuing a relationship with God.  He cried too out of frustration because He knew that despite all of the best efforts of the prophets, despite the efforts of St. John the Baptist and all the holy men and women of God, and, now, despite the best efforts of the Son of God Himself, despite all these efforts and energies, people still turned their back on God!  And, finally, Our Lord was crying with some joy in His heart because He knew that there is hope for all those that He saw.  Our Lord is the hope of the world!  Our Blessed Saviour is the remedy for all the illnesses of the world.  He is the Way, the Truth and the Life!  

As parents, we want the absolute best for our children.  In particular, we want them to have the best "future" that they possibly can with the best job, with the best home, with the best spouse, etc.  We want them to be happy but we don't want them to settle for the "second best."  But, as parents, we still need to let our children live their own life when they grow up.  As babies, as children, we have to make decisions on their behalf but when they grow up, they have to live their own life.  And, sometimes, as parents, we are disappointed in the choices that our children make.  It grieves us and frustrates us as parents because we don't want our children to settle for "second best."  This is why Our Lord was crying for the children of Jerusalem because He knew that they could have so much more by following God but instead they settled for "second best."  And Our Lord certainly knew that despite the fact that He died on the Cross many souls would still choose to turn their back on God.  Let us never turn our back on God.  Let us never settle for "second best."  Let us always choose the "best" way of life . .  . and that is a personal relationship with Our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ!

Join us for Mass at St. Margaret on Sunday, August 9th, 2015 as we celebrate the Tenth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret celebrates Mass at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  




Ninth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 2nd, 2015

As it has come to be known, the story of the "Prodigal Son" is certainly one of the most famous stories in all of Holy Scripture, if not the most famous.   There are so many aspects of this story that it is hard to pin it down to just one thing.  Of course the story revolves around the son who decides that he would rather have the inheritance "now" rather than "later."  And as a result he spends his inheritance on lavish living and then finds himself afterwards broke, and living in squalor.  And ultimately he comes back home with the intent of begging forgiveness from his father.  In my opinion, the most wonderful part of the whole story comes at about the midway point of the story:  "But when (the son) was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him."  (St. Luke 15:20)  If you notice, Our Lord tells us that the son was still a great way off when the father saw his son.  This implies to me that the father was on the "look-out" for his son.  And then when the father did finally see his son, he ran to him.  The father did not wait for the son to come to him.  He not only went to the son.  He went running to meet his son.  

This story of the Prodigal Son is really the story of humanity.  Humanity is the "prodigal son."  We have been given the gift of life.  We have been given the gift of salvation.  But not content with these two gifts we spend our "inheritance" also on riotous living as well.  We want to live life our own way and rarely bring God into our day to day living.  And just like the prodigal son in the story, we only think about God when we need Him or when we find ourselves in desperation.  And it is  then that we go to Him for help.  Like the loving father in the story, though, Our Heavenly Father also waits for us.  Our Heavenly Father comes running to us.  But He came running to sinful mankind in the form of His Son.  He sent His Son to rescue fallen mankind from their sinfulness and pride.  God is always on the lookout for us.  He not only waits for us . . . . . He looks for us to return to Him.  He is always ready to forgive, ready to bring us back, ready to love us and embrace us.  

Join us on Sunday, August 2nd, 2015 as we not only celebrate the Ninth Sunday after Trinity, but we also welcome the visit of His Grace, the Rt. Rev'd Stephen Strawn and Mrs. Strawn, who will join us for the bishops annual visitation to our parish.  Bishop Strawn will preach and celebrate Mass for us.  Please join us as we welcome the bishop and listen to what he has to say to us.  

Mass begins at 9:30 AM  We celebrate Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  



(Pictured above Mrs. Annette Strawn and Bishop Stephen Strawn)


Bishop Strawn Coming To Visit The Weekend Of August 1st and 2nd

Please join us on Sunday, August 2nd, 2015 as His Grace, the Rt. Rev'd Stephen Strawn travels from Quincy, Illinois and will visit the parishes of St. Margaret of Scotland (Indianapolis) and the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit (Greenfield). His visit will actually begin on Saturday evening, August 1st, 2015 where Bishop Strawn will join us for a pitch in supper hosted by members of both parishes.  On Sunday, August 2nd, 2015 Bishop Strawn will visit both parishes.  At 9:30 AM on Sunday morning, Bishop Strawn will preach and celebrate Mass at St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church in Indianapolis.  St. Margaret worships at the chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  At 1:00 PM, also on Sunday, August 2nd, 2015, Bishop Strawn will also say Mass and preach for the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit in Greenfield, Indiana.  Holy Spirit Parish worships at the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, located at 116 W. South Street in Greenfield (at the corner of South and Pennsylvania Streets).  Please make plans to visit with Bishop Strawn on the weekend of August 1st and 2nd, 2015.



















Eighth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 26, 2015

I am sure that you have heard the expression that someone is "bigger than life."  In other words, someone who is "bigger than life" is a person that is known for doing things in a wild way or who is known for doing something dangerous or exciting.  Like, for example, a race car driver or a movie star.  We meet a person with a "big personality" and we say he/she is "bigger than life."  You could say that a person "bigger than life" is someone who points to something beyond his or her self:  they do a dangerous job . . . they have a unique hobby . . . . they take care of dangerous animals, for example.  In a strange sort of a way, all of us point to something beyond us.    Each one of us represent something to someone else.  What do I mean, you are probably asking yourself.  Well, for example, to a store owner, you are not just a person, you are a customer or a potential customer.  If you have a spouse, you are a husband or wife.  If you have children, you are a parent.  If you like a particular sports team, you are a fan.  The list goes on and on.  To your boss, you are an employee.  It is rare that we are just merely our self, in other words.  Typically, we represent something beyond our self.  In other words, we fill roles that point beyond our self.  People don't look at us and just see . . . . Jack  . . . . or Mary . . .  or Gladys . . . . etc.  When people look at us they see rather . .   . a scout leader . . .  a customer . . . . a potential customer . . .  a parent . .  a neighbor, etc.

As Christians, we are also called not to point to our self but rather we are called to point to something greater than our self.  We are called to point to something beyond our self:  God.  In a certain sense, this is why Our Lord gave a warning about false shepherds who were only looking out for themselves.  "BEWARE of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Ye shall know them by their fruits." (St. Matthew 7:15 ff)  A true man or woman of God points beyond themselves.  They point to someone greater than they are.  A false prophet will only worry about fulfilling their own needs and not the needs of others.  A false prophet will spend their time feeding their own desires and making sure their own needs are met.  A false prophet will want all of the attention focused solely on them . . . they want the spotlight focused on them alone.  But we as true,  committed Christians are called to focus the light on God.  We are called to point towards God and not to ourselves.  We should learn to imitate St. John the Baptist when he said:  "He must increase, I must decrease." (St. John 3:30)

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday at 9:30 AM at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear God speaking to us in His Word.  Our Lord also offers to each one of us His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood to strengthen and nourish you for your daily journey.  And afterward, please join us for our Coffee Hour to have some delicious goodies and good fellowship.





Seventh Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 19th, 2015

Over the duration of a person's life it is interesting to think about all the gifts that a person has received.  I would imagine that we can not even remember every single gift that we received during our lifetime.  Certainly going back to our childhood when we would receive gifts on our birthdays, such as a doll baby or a truck, and then as we got older we might receive gifts for our graduation and other events.  Today it seems to be a trend just to give a gift card as a gift and that way you can pick out the gift that YOU would want.  This seems to make sense although it is certainly less personal in many ways.  If we think back over all the gifts we have received in our lifetime, all of them are certainly appreciated but some gifts have really stood out for us.  These gifts might stand out for a number of reasons:  the gift might have been give to us by a very special person .  . .  . maybe a parent or a spouse who is no longer with us;  or perhaps we have a gift that was given to us at a very special occasion such as a graduation or a wedding, for example; or maybe the gift itself if just very special.  For whatever reason, each of us, I am quite sure can come up with an example of an item that we treasure and we will not get rid of it because we treasure it so much.

Continuing on in the Sixth Chapter of the Epistle written to the Romans, which we also read last week, we hear:  " . . .  . but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. " (Romans 6:19 ff)  Here, St. Paul is contrasting the wages of sin and the end result being death versus giving our lives over to Christ and experiencing eternal life with Our Blessed Saviour.  As I mentioned earlier, we have been given many gifts in our lifetime but you know as well as I that the most valuable gifts that we own are not always the most expensive gifts.  The greatest gifts that we could ever be given are the ones given straight from the heart.  This is the case with the gift of eternal life that Our Lord offers to each and everyone of us:  He gives us this gift freely . .. . He offers it to us from His Heart . . .  His Most Sacred Heart . . .  . . but it is not a gift that was lightly given.  He offers this gift to you from the Cross.  He offers this gift to you through His death on the Cross to atone for your sins and mine.  We need to consider this aspect when we think about the gift that God offers to us.   This is a gift that is given to us freely but it has great value.  It was Our Saviour's life exchanged for ours on the Cross.  He hung there in our place in order that we might be forgiven.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers for Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the beautiful King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come worship God in a beautiful, traditional worship where not only does God feed you through His Word but He also feeds you at Communion time through His Most Precious Body and Blood.  Take an hour out of your week and dedicate that hour solely to God.  God, Who has given you so much, certainly deserves at least an hour out of your week, doesn't He?



Sixth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 12th, 2015

In the Sixth Chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, we hear the following:  " . . .  Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with Him   . . . " (Romans 6:3 ff)  I would imagine that just about all of us have been in the position at one point  or another in our life where we had the feeling that we had hit "rock bottom."  Perhaps it came when we had lost a job unexpectedly.  Maybe it came about when we struggled with a difficult project that fell apart and had to start all over again.  Maybe it had involved health issues or the death of a family member or a close friend.  Nonetheless, whatever circumstances we can think of, I am sure that most of us have had the feeling at one point or another that our world came crashing in on us.  I know I have felt that way a time or two in my life.  I have found myself struggling with some issue and everything seems to go wrong all at once and I feel like the whole world is crashing in on top of my head.  But then afterwards I moved forward and the world brightened.  In other words, I had to go through the darkest hours in order to finally see the light of dawn ahead of me.   And then everything seemed to improve and things got better and better and better . . .  . . Sometimes, as I say, we have to hit rock bottom in order to move forward.  Sometimes by struggling and going through the darkness, we are able to get stronger and learn from our difficulties.  We become strong through our struggles, it would seem.  We learn from our mistakes . . . . or at least we should learn from our mistakes.  When I look back on my life, I realize now that it was the struggles that made me a stronger human being.  It was the times when things seemed the worse, that I was able to move forward and grow stronger.   Although we may not want to admit it, it seems like the best "teacher" is to learn from our mistakes.

This is what we are also hearing from today's passage from the Epistle to the Romans, that through death to sin we are able to live again with Christ.  It is through dying to self that we can live with Christ.  It is through dying that we can live.  We must never forget that Christ did not experience Easter Morning without first carrying His Cross to the hill at Calvary.  The same is true for us.  We can not truly live in Christ until we have died to our sinful ways.  And for most us, this is painful whether we want to admit it or not.  As human beings, we want things our way.  We want people to do things the way we want them to be done.  We want to be comfortable.  We desire our wants and we want them right now.  We focus on our own needs and desires and forget about what God wants for us.  Most of us, quite frankly, only go running to God when we need Him for something.  Other than that, we go our own way in life.  But sin is a barrier that keeps us away from God.  Sin is like a brick wall that we keep running into time and time and time again.  We have to remove the brick wall of sin in order not to run into it again.  And once we do this.  Once we die to our sinful selves.  Once we do all we can to get rid of the sinful desires in our life, it allows us to focus more and more on God and less and less on ourselves.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, July 12th, 2015 as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we listen to God's Word found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time to nourish us and sustain us in our Christian journey.

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.





Fifth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 5th, 2015

In St. Luke's Gospel at today's Mass, we hear the story of the beginning of the association between Our Blessed Saviour and St. Peter.  As was very often the case, the crowds were pressing against Our Blessed Lord so much and He could not make Himself heard.  We hear the following:  ". .  . . He stood by the lake of Gennesaret, and saw two ships . .  . : "  (St. Luke 5:1)  And as a result, Our Lord got into St. Peter's boat so that He could preach to the multitude that had gathered to hear Him speak by Lake Gennesaret.  Now the rest of this passage obviously focuses mainly on Our Lord directing St. Peter to throw the nets out and ended up hauling in a miraculous load of fish when he could catch nothing by himself.  But the one thing that really caught my attention in reading and rereading this Gospel passage was the fact that there were two ships, St. Luke tells us.  But then if there were two ships, why did Our Lord choose the one that St. Peter owned and not the other ship?   The fact of the matter is that God chooses each one of us for specific tasks because each one of us has particular skills and talents.  One person might be good at teaching while someone else is good at preaching.  Or it might be the case that someone is good at fixing things while another person is skilled in music.  The bottom line is that each one of us might not be talented in one area but very skilled in something totally different.  Again, I can not help but focus on the fact that there were two ships in today's Gospel passage and Our Lord picked one but not the other.  Maybe I am making too big of a deal out of this fact, but in my mind, it does point out that Our Lord does pick us.  He chooses us.  He singles us out and calls each one of us.  The key, though, is that we need to respond accordingly.  We have to say "yes" when we are called.  We may not understand why Our Lord has chosen us.  Look at today's passage, St. Peter did not understand Our Lord's instruction to cast the net out when he had been working so hard all night and caught nothing.  And yet he did it anyway.  Our Lady most certainly did not understand when she was told that she would be pregnant with child and yet her response was "Let it be done to me according to your word!"  She said yes despite the fact that she did not understand . . . .  St. Peter said yes despite the fact he could not understand how it would be possible.  This is the definition of faith.  God chooses us.  We respond. And sometimes we may not even understand how it will take place . . . . or why it will take place . . . . or why in the world that God would choose me . . . but we respond to God's call and move forward.   This is faith!

St. Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We gather together for Mass at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we meditate on God speaking to us.  Come receive Our Lord's Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And then join us after Mass at our coffee hour where we have many delicious goodies and fellowship.





Fourth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 28th, 2015

Being a Christian is not an easy job by any stretch of the imagination.  Come to think of it, being a human being is not an easy thing either.  Having to make decisions that affect your own life.  Having to make decisions that affect others . . . . for example, if you are a parent or the owner of a company.  Having to do things that you would prefer not to do but have to be done . . .  cutting the grass comes to mind or paying bills.  Having to juggle various roles all at the same time . . .   going to work . . . taking care of your home . . .  being a parent . . .  being a child . . . . paying bills . . . doing chores . . .  etc. The point being is that life is busy . . . at least it is for me . . . and life is full of difficulties and challenges . . .  again, at least it is for me.  But as I look around on social media and in the news and listening to people's conversations, it seems that people must have a whole lot of free time that they don't know what to do with.  It used to be that if you held a different belief than me, I might not have agreed with you but it amounted to nothing more than that:  a difference of opinion.  Period.  End of story.  I might not like your choice or I might not like your belief but on the other hand you might not be too fond of something about me either.  But we just left it at that.  And, more importantly, we left it alone.  You had your belief.  I had my belief. Period.  Today, people get into all kinds of arguments and criticisms of one another if they do not agree and support the other person one hundred and twenty percent.

In St. Luke's Gospel, Our Lord said:  " BE ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful."  (St. Luke 6:36)  But then He goes on to say in the following verse:  "Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned; forgive, and ye shall be forgiven."   (v.37)  It is that last part that we should be most concerned with . . . ". .  . forgive, and ye shall be forgiven."   I have long said that we tend to be so focused on the wrong-doing in others lives, if for no other reason, it takes the focus off of our wrong doing.  If I focus on someone else and where they are wrong in their life, it means that I have less time to focus on what is wrong in my own life.    A few verses later, Our Lord states in Verse 41:  "And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?"  Why am I so concerned about the speck that I see in my brother's eye when I am totally oblivious to the plank in my own eye?!?  The bottom line is this:  Don't be too quick to criticize someone else because your backyard probably needs a little sprucing up as well.  You don't have to be in complete agreement with someone in order to be civil and loving to that person.  Our Lord stated that we need to "love one another"  He did not say that we need to "agree with one another."  And finally,  show a little mercy and compassion to those around you.  Do not be so quick to condemn someone who does not agree with you.  That person may not agree with you either on other subjects.  The bottom line is that each one of us needs to be concerned if we agree with God.   I should be LESS concerned about making MY own voice heard  . . . and be MORE concerned about making GOD'S voice heard in my life and the way in which I treat others around me.

St. Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father as His family here on earth.  Come receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time so that you can be nourished and fortified for the week ahead.





Third Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 21st, 2015

You have to wonder about people sometimes.  Quite frankly, you have to wonder about this old world sometimes.  You sometimes hear questions from people as to why evil goes on in the world.  These people  don't understand why "bad things happen to good people."  In a certain sense, this is a fair enough question.  Theologians along with great thinkers throughout history have been asking this same question basically since the world began.  Why do bad things happen at all?  And then many people start placing the blame on God at least indirectly when they ask:  why did God "allow" this to happen?  Why didn't He stop it?  Again, in times of tragedy, such as we witnessed as a nation this week in regards to the horrible church shooting in South Carolina this week, it is easy to question why evil was permitted to happen.  Or why did a one year old little girl die, in a totally separate incident, in a different state, due allegedly to neglect and/or abuse from her parents?  Or why would a young woman be diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and have to spend her time doing chemotherapy and fighting her cancer?  She should have been spending her time taking classes and enjoying time with friends and doing the things that young people typically do instead of going in and out of hospitals and doctors offices.  Instead, her family had to watch her suffer through a terrible disease which she did not choose to have in the first place.  Why did any of these examples, and a whole host of others that we could come up with, happen in the first place?

If we turn to the First Epistle of St. Peter, we hear the following:  "Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: . .   " (I St. Peter 5:5 ff)  Let's be clear.  The devil is indeed prowling throughout the world causing as much mischief as he can.  The devil does certainly plant seeds in our minds, hearts and souls with evil intent.  He misleads us and he lies to us. He plants foundations of confusion in our minds so that we will not see the truth but see things how he wants us to see them.  But we need to take St. Peter's advice and be "vigilant" and be "sober" . . . . in other words, pay attention! . . . be on guard! . . . . the devil wants to devour us . . . the world wants to devour us . . . . .  . evil wants to devour us!  All the more reason to stay close to God.  Get to know God on a personal level.  Make Him your best friend.  Make Him your personal adviser.  Let God be your instructor in life.  You see, so many people today let Satan instruct them and they don't even realize it.  What happens when there is a void?  Typically, something comes in to fill up that void.  This is what happens when we do not have God in our life.  We have a void when we do not have God in our life and that void is filled with all kinds of things:  evil thoughts and misinformation and hatred and jealousy  .  . .  . . Fill your hearts with God and there will be no room for hatred!  Fill your mind with things of God and there will be no opportunity for the devil to fill it with thoughts of mischief.  Fill your soul with Christ and you will never go wrong.   Give your heart to God and the devil will never have the opportunity to take it!

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come worship with us and spend a quality hour in worship of God, set apart from the busyness of the world.  Listen to the Word of God found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And then after Mass, stick around for some delicious goodies at our coffee hour.





Second Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 14th, 2015

Have you ever met a person that believed so strongly in a brand name, that they used that brand name and nothing else?  Maybe a person you know will only drink one brand of beer, for example.  Or perhaps another person will only use one brand of toilet paper.  Or will only purchase one make of automobile. Or one brand of tool.  The list goes on and on.  Maybe we are that person when it comes to certain items.  In the society in which we live, so many people "believe" in products, and brand names, and celebrities, and sports figures, and politicians, and agendas . . . .  Again, the list goes on and on as to what people "believe" in.  In the First Epistle of St. John, we are reminded of the commandment:  "That we should believe on the Name of His Son Jesus Christ, and love one another, as he gave us commandment." (I St. John 3:23)  St. John reminds us that we are commanded to believe on the Name of Our Blessed Saviour.  So many things that we "believe" on will ultimately fail us: whether they be consumer products that we buy. Or politicians that make endless promises that they can never keep.  Even people that we know and love will disappoint us every now and then.  But when it comes to Our Blessed Saviour, He will never disappoint us. . . .  He will never fail us . . . He will never leave us.  And out of this belief will come love.  I have heard it said that the more you hang around with someone the more you will become like that person.  I believe this is true for the most part.  Don't children learn from their parents?  Thus, children pick up traits and habits of their parents?  To a certain degree, don't we become like our spouse?  Picking up habits or expressions or likes and dislikes?  The same is true for Our Blessed Saviour.  The more time we spend with Him, the more we will become just like Him.  And if you had to pick just one word to describe Our Blessed Saviour, I am sure the perfect word would be:  L-O-V-E.

Take time out of your busy schedule to spend time with God.  Dedicate one hour to be with Him.  We dedicate time out of every day to:  sleeping; eating; working; relaxation.  Let us take one hour out of a busy week and dedicate it solely to God.  Join us for Mass as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour as God's family in traditional worship.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time so that we can be nourished and sustained for the week ahead.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.





Corpus Christi (Transferred), Sunday, June 7, 2015

In the First Epistle to the Corinthians 11:23, we hear:  "I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you . . . .  ."  Maybe you have done a "Pay It Forward" or at least have heard of it.  This is where someone who has been blessed and wants to "share" their blessing blesses someone else.  For example, in "Paying It Forward," you may have someone at the drive-through window not only pay for their food but will tell the cashier that they want to to pay for the car behind them as well.  The idea is to bless others as you have been blessed.  It makes me think of the quote from today's epistle to the Corinthians:  " I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you. . . . . "  God has blessed each and everyone of us.  In fact, God has blessed us in ways that we are not even aware of.  He has blessed us with life, first and foremost.  He has blessed us with health.  He has blessed us with knowledge and know-how.  He has blessed us with a roof over our head and food on our table.  Sure, there are "road-bumps" which all of us hit every now and then.  But that is what we call "life."  But the point is that God has provided for us.  God has watched over us.  And even in the times where we seemed to be at our lowest, God was there with us.  Being a Christian is acknowledging this fact.  Being a Christian is facing the fact that we can not go it alone.  We need God.  We have done nothing to earn His love for us.  And, yet, He loves us freely and gives to us freely.

The best parents are not the ones that buy the most expensive "toys" or "trinkets" for their children.  The best parents are the ones that are there for their children, in the good times and bad.  The best parents are the ones that share of themselves with their children . . . . they share time with their children . . . . these parents do not rely solely on sharing "objects" or "things" with their children . . .  . they share of themselves.  This is what God does with us.  He shares of Himself.  This is especially true each and every time we gather for Mass.  God shares His Most Precious Body and Blood . . . . He gives us of Himself to nourish us . . . to strengthen us ..  . . to fortify us.  And this is the lesson He teaches us how to act with others:  to give unto others what has been given unto us.

Come celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi with us on Sunday, June 7, 2015.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers for Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the beautiful King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come worship God in a beautiful, traditional worship where not only does God feed you through His Word but He also feeds you at Communion time through His Most Precious Body and Blood.  Take an hour out of your week and dedicate that hour solely to God.  God, Who has given you so much, certainly deserves at least an hour out of your week, doesn't He?



Trinity Sunday, May 31st, 2015

On Sunday, May 31st, 2015, we celebrate Trinity Sunday.  The Gospel for the day comes to us from the Third Chapter of the Gospel of St. Matthew.  In this chapter we find ourselves witness to the discussion between Nicodemus and Our Blessed Saviour.  In this conversation, Our Lord is telling Nicodemus that he must be born again.  Nicodemus is confused by this expression and asks how can someone be born again.  Our Lord explains:  " That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. "  Of course, Our Lord was differentiating between physical birth and spiritual birth.  One can not be physically born a second time.  It only happens the one time and cannot be repeated.  But in a spiritual sense, yes, we can be born again when we give our lives over to God and dedicate our lives to him.

Of course, when Our Lord stated that "flesh is flesh" and "Spirit is spirit," He was referring to the example of being born again.  But this does point out something very important for us Christians to consider.  Very often in our lives, we can differentiate between the various sections of our lives.  For example,  we differentiate between the time spent where we work and the time spent at home.  When I am at work, I focus on my job responsibilities but when I am at home I focus on things I do there, such as chores or projects or even relaxation.  We dedicate certain portions of our time to volunteer activities, home activities, family activities, church activities,  etc.  We can divide our time and we can wear "different hats" to signify who we are at the time:  worker; home owner; parent; child; spouse; neighbor; volunteer; etc.  The list goes on and on.  As we live life on a daily basis we play different "roles" based on what we are doing at that particular moment.

But when it comes to being a Christian, our life can not be "chopped up into sections," so to speak.  In other words, we can not say that we are a Christian when we go to church but not a Christian when we are at home.  It doesn't work that way.  A true, committed Christian needs to be just that . . .   a true, committed Christian 24 hours a day, whether he/she is at church . . . or at home . . .  or at work . . . or at the grocery . . . or even driving in traffic.  You see, there are so many people who actually do act one way while in church and another way when they leave church.  They act very Christian when they go to church.  They dress up.  And they sing loudly when the hymns are sung.  And they say "Amen" even louder when the preacher gives his sermon.  But then as soon as church is over, they take off their "Christian hat" and put it away until next Sunday and they live completely different lives.  Being a Christian means being a Christian 24 hours a day . . . 7 days a week ..  ..  365 days a year.  This proves to be very difficult sometimes.  But when we come to the realization that God walks with us 24 hours a day . . .  7 days a week .. .  365 days a year . . .  when we realize that, it should make it easier for us to join Him in that walk.  As Our Lord said to Nicodemus, you must be born again . . .

St. Margaret Anglican Church gathers together as God's family every Sunday to hear God's Word, to worship God as a family, and to receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  Take an hour out of your busy week and dedicate it solely to God.  Join us as we listen to God speaking to us in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.

We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.





Whitsunday, Sunday, May 24th, 2015

As we hear in the Second Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, we find ourselves in the presence of the Apostles and the Disciples and the Blessed Mother all gathered together in prayer.  Now, as it points out quite clearly in that second chapter:  "And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind and it filled all the house where they were sitting" (Chapter 2:2)  Now, as we try to imagine what it was like for those gathered on that very first Whitsunday, it sounds almost terrifying when we hear that there was a "rushing mighty wind" filling the whole house.  But the point that I would like to focus on is the fact that the disciples of Our Lord were there to hear what God had to say to them.

There's an old saying that goes something like:  " . . . if a tree falls in the forest, does it make a sound?"  Certainly, if a tree falls in the forest, yes, it does make a sound as it comes crashing to the ground.  But the point is that if nobody is around to hear the noise . . .  ..  nobody hears the crash.  The point is clear.  The disciples were not only gathered together on that first Whitsunday, they were also open to hearing what God had to say to them.  That is why they were gathered in prayer.

How many times has God tried to speak to us, but were where not there to hear?  Were we not "there" because we were paying attention to something else?  Were we not "there" because we were listening to something completely different?  Were we not "there" because our mind was focused on something other than God?   You see, we need to make a point to "listen" in order to "hear" what is being said.  This is true in general but it is certainly true when it comes to "sounds from Heaven."  Someone can come up and say something to me but if I am completely focused on something else, I am more than likely not paying attention to what is being said.  "Excuse me, what was that you were saying?"  With God, this is certainly the case:  we need to pay attention to God in order to hear what He is saying to us.  The disciples were gathered in prayer and they were making a point to pay attention to what God would say to them.  How many times have we missed what God is saying to us because were were not listening . . . not paying attention . .. or focused on something completely different?

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, May 24th, 2015 at 9:30 AM as we gather to celebrate Mass.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood for Holy Communion.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.



Sunday after Ascension, Sunday, May 17th, 2015

In the Twenty-fourth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear the telling of when Our Blessed Lord ascended into Heaven in the sight of the disciples"  " . . . . he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven ."  (v.51)  To say the least, this moment must have caused a wide range of emotions for the disciples:  joy, awe, confusion, majesty, excitement, inspiration, etc.  At any rate, in the following verse St. Luke tells us that they "returned to Jerusalem with great joy."  When we are in the presence of great people, we are inspired to greatness.  When we see truly inspiring acts of bravery or courage, we are inspired to greatness as well.  When we find ourselves in the presence of someone so filled with the spirit of God, we are inspired to want that same spirit.  The disciples and the apostles experienced all of this in the presence of Our Blessed Lord.  They saw His example on a daily basis:  they heard Him teach and preach; they saw Him cure the sick; they saw Him perform acts of love and compassion on those in need of God's love and forgiveness;  the disciples saw Him show love to those around Him.  And as a result of being in His presence day in and day out, they were affected as well by His life and the things that they saw and heard.  They were inspired to greatness just being in His company.

All of us, I am quite sure, can come up with an example of a time where we were inspired to greatness by what we saw or witnessed.   Whether it be the example of witnessing an inspiring performance by a great singer or a talented dancer.  Or it could be the witness of heroic bravery or courage exhibited by someone in the face of great danger who went forward anyway.  Or, finally, it could be the quiet example of someone who has such a close relationship with God that we can sense God's presence in that person.  Our Blessed Lord inspired the disciples to greatness.  He changed their "ordinary" lives into "extraordinary" lives.  This is how it should be with God.  So many people in the world are affected by the world, drawn to the world, brought down to the world's standards . . . .  We, for our part, should be inspired by Our Blessed Saviour's example to become something "extraordinary."  The disciples allowed their lives to be affected in such a way that the love of God showed forth in their lives.  So, too, we need to allow God to touch our lives in such a way that we show forth His love to the world around us.  Our Blessed Saviour inspired the disciples to greatness.  We should be inspired to that same greatness and show forth the glories of God to the world and to be a reminder of God's love to the world around us.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for worship on Sunday, May 17th, 2015 as we celebrate the Sunday after Ascension.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in both the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we join together as God's family to worship Him and to spend quality time with Him in traditional worship and to receive Him in His Most Blessed Body and Blood!  After Mass, join us for Coffee Hour where we can enjoy friendship and goodies.



Fifth Sunday after Easter, Sunday, May 10th, 2015

In the Gospel for today's Mass coming to us from the 16th Chapter of St. John's Gospel, Our Blessed Lord is speaking with the disciples and they are discussing the fact that He came from the Father.  He also tells them that there will come a time that each one of them will be scattered and will leave Him alone but that He will not truly be alone because the Father is with Him.  Have you ever had the feeling that you are alone?  You might be in a room full of people . . . or on a crowded street . . . . or among your coworkers at your job .. . . but despite all the people that were in close proximity, you still felt alone and by yourself?  Maybe this feeling came from the fact that you felt you were facing a problem by yourself and you had to take care of it yourself alone.  Perhaps you felt "alone" because you felt that nobody else could understand what you are feeling in regards to your emotions.  Or maybe you felt "alone" because you felt that nobody really cared about you or cared how you felt.  For whatever reason, probably all of us have felt "alone" at some point in our life.  And yet, as Our Blessed Saviour pointed out to the disciples, we are never truly alone even when we are physically alone because God is always with us.  At the end of the passage Our Lord tells the disciples " . . . that in Me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation ."  This is the other thing that we always have to consider.  In God, we have peace beyond understanding.  In God, we have peace that will never leave us.  In God, we have our rock that will never disappoint and He will always be our stronghold.  None of these things can be said about the world.  The world can be a beautiful place.  There is much beauty that we can find in the world.   And yet, as Our Lord stated, we will find much tribulation in the world:  crime . .  . fighting . . .  wars .. .  . famine . . . . sickness . . .  poverty . . .  the list goes on and on.  But in God we find none of these things.  In God, we find our fulfillment.  In God, we find the reason for our being.  In God, we have salvation and forgiveness for the sins we have committed.  In God, we have a loving Father Who loves us so much that He sent His Son into the world to die for each one of us.  God is always with us.  God never leaves us.  God is ever faithful to us even when we are not faithful to Him.

You can join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible.  We also use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We gather together as God's Family to worship Him and to be nourished by Him:  He nourishes us first through His Word; and then He nourishes us by His Most Precious Body and Blood during Holy Communion.  Take some time out of your busy schedule and make some time for God this week.

St. Margaret of Scotland church worships each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  You can join us for Mass by joining us in the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us for Mass and stay afterward for our Coffee Hour.




Fourth Sunday after Easter, May 3rd, 2015

In the Epistle for today's Mass from the Fourth Sunday after Easter, we hear the following:  " . . . . and receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls ." (St. James 1:17-21)   Have you ever received a gift . . .  .. or for that matter, perhaps you bought something for yourself . . .  . and as you opened up the package, you discovered that it was something very precious to you.  As a result, you opened the package with great care not wanting to damage your new treasure in the least.  When I read the words of St. James from the quote above it makes me think of that image:  " . . .  receive with meekness the engrafted word . . . ."  Here, St. James is referring, of course, to the Word of God.  And what he is advising is that we take the Word of God and plant what we read and what we hear in our hearts.  Sometimes if you go to the various social media sites such as Facebook, Pinterest, etc.  you will read various sayings that people have posted.  One saying I read recently stated something to the effect of:  "It is good to read the Word, but it is better to know the Author."  Of course, the meaning is clear.  It is clearly one thing to read the words of Scripture but it is better to know God and to have a personal relationship with Him.  I would agree with this and I am sure that you would also.  How many times do we read something, whether it be an email at work, or a news article, or even a handwritten message, and if we are not paying attention we have to read it all over again or go back to it again to get exactly what it means?  When we read Holy Scripture, often times we may read one specific passage .  . .  or one specific verse . . .  or one specific chapter . .  . and then we go back and read the same exact passage some time later, we seemingly get a completely different meaning from our reading.  The passage speaks something brand new to us that we did not "see" in our previous reading.  Has that ever happened to you when you read the Bible?   When that happens, be assured of two things:  God is speaking to you and that the Word of God is alive!  This is what St. James is getting at when we stated " . . . .  receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls."  Engraft the Word of God into your hearts.  Let it become a part of you.  Let it live within you.  To so many people, the Word of God is just a set of words and no more than that.  To others, the Word of God is simply some "book" setting up on a shelf gathering dust.  The Word of God is so much more than this.  The Holy Scriptures are meant to be absorbed into your heart, your soul.  The Word of God is like a seed that is planted in your heart.  And you water that seed by not only reading the Word of God but also opening yourself to God and letting Him into your life.  As St. James reminds us, let the Word of God to be "engrafted" into your hearts.  Let God speak to you through His Word and then put those words into practice on a daily basis.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers together every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we gather together to hear the Word of God, found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and also the King James Version of the Bible.  Join us as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father, to take time out of our busy week to dedicate to Him alone and to worship Him.  And, finally, come forward to received the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time so that we can be strengthened and nourished for the journey ahead.



Third Sunday after Easter, April 26th, 2015

In the Sixteenth chapter of St. John's Gospel, Our Blessed Saviour is preparing the disciples for His eventual departure from their midst.  But this is confusing for the disciples because Our Lord is telling them "A little while, and ye shall not see Me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see Me." (St. John 16:16)  Obviously, He was referring to His coming Death upon the Cross, Burial, and Resurrection.  Later on He says:  " . . . and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. " (v.20)  As human beings, we have a lot of emotions, we feel happy; we feel sad; we feel joyous; we feel anxious; we feel scared; we feel peaceful; etc.   And typically, these emotions have root causes.  For example, we might feel sad because a beloved family member just passed away.  Or we might feel joyful because it is a beautiful Spring day, and we are off from work, and we are going to the baseball game.  Sometimes we feel a certain way due seemingly to no reason at all but typically our emotions are caused by some factor as described in the examples above.  For Christians, Christ is the reason for our hope.  He is the reason for our joy.  Our Blessed Saviour is the reason for our motivation in life.  We must always remember to acknowledge that God is the Lord and Master of our life.  We must always remember to put God first in everything.  We need to have a personal relationship with God and to speak with Him every day.  When we have God deep in our heart, the world can never take that away, no matter what it throws at you.  This is why Our Blessed Savior said:  "And ye now therefore have sorrow: but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you." (v.22)  No man can take away the joy that God has given us.  The world can not take away the love that we have for Our Heavenly Father.  No amount of heartache can take away the love that God has for each one of us.  Always keep in mind the love that God has for you.  Always remember that God has chosen you as one of His own.  Never forget that Christ died on the Cross to atone for your sins so that you can be forgiven.

Join us on Sunday, April 26th, 2015 as we celebrate the Third Sunday after Easter.  Join us as we celebrate Holy Mass and listen to the Words of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join with us as we gather together as God's family and worship our Heavenly Father.  Come receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time in order to be strengthened and nourished.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass starts at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.



Second Sunday after Easter, April 19th, 2015

Perhaps the "Second Sunday after Easter" could be renamed "Good Shepherd" Sunday because both the First Epistle of St. Peter and the Tenth Chapter of St. John both mention "shepherd."  St. John's Tenth Chapter specifically cites Our lord speaking about being the Good Shepherd:  "I am the good shepherd; and know my sheep, and am known of mine."   I saw a wonderful video recently on Youtube showing a soldier coming home from active duty and his pet cat immediately recognized him and jumped up into his arms and started showing him love and affection.  I am sure we have all seen similar examples of animals ... whether they be cats or dogs . . . . recognizing their owners.  We, as Christians . . . . faithful, loving, committed Christians . . . . recognize Our Blessed Saviour.  We recognize His voice when He calls us.  We recognize His ways.  We recognize His commandments and directives.  We only know these things because we know Him . . .. or we ought to.  Not only with pets, but with people also, we know our friends, our loved ones, our spouses.  We know what they enjoy doing, what they like to eat or drink, what they like to do in their free time, etc.  We only know these things because we have taken the time to get to know the other person.  It's the same way with God.  When we take the opportunity to get to know God through prayer and reading the Scriptures.  "I know My sheep and they know Me."  God knows us and we should get to know Him.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, April 19th, 2015 as we gather together to worship Our Blessed Saviour.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time and then stay with us after Mass as we share fellowship and goodies at the coffee hour.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM



First Sunday after Easter, April 12th, 2015

In the First Epistle of St. John, beginning in the Fifth Chapter, we hear the following:  "For there are three that bear witness, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one."  Here, St. John is pointing out the obvious that the Spirit, the water, and the blood are in agreement and confirm one another.  Obviously, here St. John is making reference to the Holy Ghost, Baptism, and the Precious Blood of Christ.  All are in agreement and all confirm the holiness and righteousness of God.  But in a similar way, all the different aspects of our life should be in agreement as well.  If you look at your life, there are different aspects:  you work; you go shopping; you go to church; you work home projects; you relax; you pray; etc. You could say that you wear many "hats" in your life.  And the point is this that whether we are in church or at work or at home or at the store,  . . . .  all the different aspects of our life should be in agreement one with another.  I am sure that we have met people that act one way at church and another way outside of church.  More than likely, we would call this person a hypocrite.  That type of person would probably dress up and get all pretty and then go to church.  But we need to remember that it is what we have on the "inside" and not on the "outside" that makes us a Christian.  What makes us a committed Christian is found on the "inside:"  our heart; our soul; our mind.  And as long as we are committed on the "inside" in all of these three, we will be the "same person" no matter where we find ourselves:  at work; at church; at home; etc.

Join us at St. Margaret of Scotland church on Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.



Easter Sunday, April 5th, 2015

In the Twenty-Seventh chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear the Passion of Our Lord.  At the end of the chapter we are also told of Our Blessed Saviour being laid in the tomb.  St. Matthew tells us that Our Lord is laid in the tomb that belonged to Joseph, who himself went to Pilate to ask for the body of our Blessed Saviour.  After He was laid in the tomb the chief priests and Pharisees, we are told by St. Matthew, that they also went to Pilate to ask that a guard be placed at the tomb because they remembered Our Lord's words that He would rise on the third day.  Pilate told them to set a guard and "they went, and made the sepulchre sure, sealing the stone, and setting a watch."

We also have been setting a watch . . . . we have been anticipating the arrival of Our Blessed Saviour.  We wait for Him every day.  We wait for Him to speak to us when we read Scripture.  We watch for Him when we sit in prayer.  We wait in anticipation when we have a problem or need assistance in our life and wait and watch for Our Blessed Saviour to come to our aid.  We watch for Him when we go to Mass and receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  At all of these times just described we need to watch for Our Blessed Saviour.  We need to listen to what He says to us.  So often, in the "busy-ness" of life, we do not take the time to pay attention, to listen.  Also, our attention is diverted by the distractions of this life:  whether they be issues that take up our time; or television; or computer; or jobs; or other diversions. God should always take the top priority in our life.  Nothing should take our attention off of Him.  Let us set a watch for Him and welcome Him into our heart.

Holy Saturday Mass will be held on Saturday evening, April 4th, 2015 at the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit in Greenfield, Indiana.  Mass will be celebrated at 6:00 PM at the beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church, which is located at 216 W. South Street in Greenfield.

Easter Sunday Mass will be held on Sunday, April 5th, 2015 at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Church.  Mass is held at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please note that on Easter Sunday, we will not be in the chapel as we normally celebrate there.  Rather, we will be on the Fourth Floor of Marquette Manor.



Palm Sunday, March 29th, 2015

In the Epistle for Palm Sunday taken from the Second Chapter of the Epistle written to the Philippians, we are reminded to  " . . LET this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus  .. . ."  meaning that our mind-set should also be that same of Our Blessed Saviour.   Our Lord did not have to do anything that He did.  He did not have to be born as a small baby into this world.  He did not have to grow up and become a carpenter.  He did not have to be mocked and laughed at.  He did not have to be scourged at the pillar.  He did not have to carry His Cross.  And He certainly did not have to die a cruel death on that same Cross  We are reminded that  " . . .  He humbled himself, and became obedient unto death . . . ."  Our Lord humbled Himself to become a human being, like us in all things but sin.  We are called to humble ourselves as well.  This is difficult for most of us.  Namely, because we always want things our way.  But we are also called to become humble and become obedient unto death.  In our case, though, we are called to become humble unto the ways of God and dead unto the ways of the world.  The world does not offer anything to us that is lasting.  Yes, it's true that the world offers a lot of things to us that capture our attention for the moment:  worldly things such as possessions and power . . .  money and wealth . . .. trinkets such as electronics or clothes or jewelry.  All of these things are nice in their own way but they will not last.  What God offers to us is everlasting.  What God gives to us freely can never be taken away.  He offers us His love.  But we are often torn by the ways of the world.  We Christians live in the world, but we are not called to be of the world.  Slowly . . . gradually . . . we need to turn ourselves more and more away from the world and turn more and more to God, Whose love is everlasting.  Let us imitate Our Blessed Saviour and humble ourselves to God and become obedient to the death of sin in our lives and dead to the ways of the world so that we can grow closer to God.

Join us for Mass on Sunday, March 29th, as we celebrate Palm Sunday.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we join together as God's family and worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we come to the altar to be fed the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And, finally, please stay after Mass for some fellowship at our coffee hour.

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.



Passion Sunday, March 22, 2015

In the Letter to the Hebrews, in the Ninth Chapter, we hear a contrast between how the priest used to purify the "holy place," (or the Holy of Holies) as opposed to Our Blessed Saviour purifying humanity.  Both involve blood.  One by the "blood of goats and calves" (Hebrews 9:12) and the other purification "by His own Blood."  (v.12)  To understand why blood was so important in both acts, it is vital that we look back to the Old Testament and look in the Book of Leviticus.  Let us look at Leviticus 17:11  "For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul."  In this light, Our Blessed Saviour shed His own Blood at Calvary to atone for our sins . . . to make atonement for the wrongs we have committed . . . . to purify us.  Every drop of the Precious Blood of Jesus that dripped from that Cross at Calvary was shed on your behalf.  He shed it for your purification and your sanctification.  And just like the priests of old sprinkled blood to purify the "Holy of Holies" and the "Holy Place," Christ shed His Blood to purify you!  You are purified by the Blood of the Lamb of God!  We must never forget this point.  Christ died on the Cross and shed His Precious Blood on that first Good Friday so that He could die for us; purify us by His Blood; and begin the process of allowing us to rise again with Him.  It is only through death that we can rise again.  It is only through Christ's Death and Passion, that we are allowed the opportunity to die to our own sins.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for Mass on Sunday, March 22nd, 2015 at 9:30 AM as we come together as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we take time out of our busy schedules and dedicate this time to God alone.  Join us as we come forward and receive the Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Keep God's Name Holy

Anglo-Catholics are very traditional. One of the traditions that Anglo-Catholics still hold dear is that we bow our heads when we hear the Holy Name of Jesus spoken aloud. Up until fifty or sixty years ago, this beautiful tradition was still practiced by Christians throughout the world. Sadly, over time this tradition of showing reverence at the Name of Jesus has decreased in usage.
On the other hand, ironically, usage of Our Lord’s Name seems to have increased . . . but sadly not in a reverent fashion. On a daily basis, whether it be in the workplace or out in public at a store . . . or on television or in movies, you hear people using the Lord’s Name frequently. You hear people saying “Jesus” or “Jesus Christ” or sadly even “God d**n.” Even on the Internet you see the initials written “OMG” on a frequent basis. And, sadly, you even hear some young people write (or say, for that matter) the letter “F” before “G” (as in “OM*G),” which is most certainly blasphemous to say the least.
If you are in church, you would certainly expect to hear Our Lord’s Name mentioned. If you ever attend a Revival, you would expect to hear Our Blessed Lord’s Name spoken aloud or even sang in beautiful hymns. Certainly, in times of prayer, it is a good thing to call Our Lord by His Name. And, finally, in reading Holy Scripture, you expect to hear God’s Name being mentioned. But in any other instance where you hear Our Lord’s Name mentioned in a “secular” setting, this shows complete and utter disregard for the Sacredness of God’s Holy Name.
Even God Himself acknowledges the sacredness of His Name when He gave Moses the Ten Commandments: “Thou shalt not take the Name of the Lord Thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh His Name in vain.” (Exodus 20:7) And we hear elsewhere: “ . . . neither shalt thou profane the Name of Thy God: I am the Lord.” (Leviticus 18:21) Back then the Name of the Lord was certainly acknowledged as something holy and sacred. In fact, we hear the following from the Book of Leviticus: “And he that blasphemeth the Name of the Lord, he shall surely be put to death . . . .” (Leviticus 24:16) Now, surely we are not recommending that anyone that blasphemes be put to death but this verse certainly points out that in the past, people made a point to not take the Lord’s Name lightly and did not take the Name of the Lord in vain.
We need to be reminded and taught that the Name of the Lord is precious and holy. In showing respect and reverence for the Name of God, we surely show the respect and reverence which we have for God Himself. In acknowledging the holiness of His Name, we acknowledge the holiness of the Good Lord Himself. If the Name of God is not held in esteem, then the question becomes do we even hold God in esteem? Even in the “Our Father,” keep in mind that we pray “. . . Hallowed be Thy Name . . .” Do we keep God’s Name holy if we use that Name as a curse or use it in an “ordinary” fashion. There is nothing ordinary about our God. God is extraordinary. He is holy. He is sacred. He is the Alpha and the Omega. He is the Great “I Am.” God is indeed Our Heavenly Father. When we remember all these things, it puts into perspective that we should not take the Name of Our Heavenly Father lightly. “Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under Heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.” (Acts 4:12)
Let us always show honour, respect and love for the Holy Name of Jesus. Let us never take this Name lightly. Neither let us use this Name lightly. Let us teach our children not only by our words but also by our example that we do not blaspheme God’s Name and do not take His Name in vain. In showing respect for God’s Name, we show the respect and regard we hold for God. “That at the Name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in Heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth.” (Philippians 2:10





Laetare Sunday, Sunday, March 15th, 2015

The Gospel for Laetare Sunday comes from the Sixth Chapter of St. John's Gospel.  As we begin this passage St. John tells us of the large crowds that have followed Our Lord due to them hearing about the many people that He has cured.  Our Lord's fame has grown far and wide due to the many miracles that He has performed.   And many of those gathered want to not only to see Him but to hear what He has to say.  Now the first thing that should strike us when we hear the story of Our Lord feeding the multitude is that Our Lord is a compassionate Lord.  He knew that these people that gathered together to hear Him and to get just a glimpse of Him would be tired . . .  would be hungry . . .  would need to be sustained and nourished.  And He called together the disciples and inquired what would need to be done.  Now, we all know what happened next.  Our Blessed Saviour multiplied the five loaves and the two fish into feeding the multitude.

What I would like to focus on is what Our Lord did after everyone was fed.  He called together the disciples and told them:  "Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost. ." (St. John 6:12)  Sometimes our lives feel like "fragments," in a sense.  We run here.  We run there.  We take care of our families.  We take care of our home. We go to our jobs.  We go shopping for what we need.  The list goes on and on.  As a result, we feel like we are running around from one place to the next, going from doing one thing into something completely different.  I know I feel this way very often.  And I talk to so many people that feel the same way.  Our lives are divided between this, that and the other.  But the important thing to remember is that God takes our "fragments" and makes them whole.  Just like Our Blessed Saviour fed and nourished the five-thousand, He feeds and nourishes us still today.  Just like He saw the vast multitude gathered around Him, He still sees us in need of His strength to carry on our daily lives.  And He is that strength.  He is the One Who nourishes us.  He is the One Who sustains us.  He is the One Who makes us whole.  He takes the fragments of our lives and makes our life complete.   There is no other person, thing, or feeling in the world that can make us complete.  There is only one person who can do this for us.  And that is God.  Give your heart to Him.  Let Him be your nourishment.  Let God be your sustaining force.  Let Our Blessed Saviour be the One you run to in order to be fed.

Join us for Mass on Sunday, March 15th, as we celebrate Laetare Sunday.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we join together as God's family and worship Our Heavenly Father.  Join us as we come to the altar to be fed the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.  And, finally, please stay after Mass for some fellowship at our coffee hour.

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.



Third Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 8th, 2015

Maybe it's just me, I don't know, but I am amazed at how often I "revert" back to doing something when I know I should not be doing it and then I turn around and do it again.  For example, I type every day on the computer.  And sometimes . . . . I don't know the reason why .. . . I may type the wrong letter in a certain word and then I will go back and erase it and type the correct word but then the next time I get to type that same word I end up typing the same exact wrong letter again.  And then it gets to the point that it is laughable because then suddenly no matter how hard I try and how determined I am NOT to type that one wrong letter . . .  . I do it again.

Sin is like that as well.  We may keep doing the same wrong things all over again even though deep down inside we know that the sinful behaviour is no good for us but we keep going back and doing the same thing over and over again.  In the Fifth Chapter of St. Paul's Letter to the Ephesians, we hear the following:  "For ye were sometimes darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord."  Our Blessed Saviour redeemed us by His Own Precious Blood.  Our Saviour took our sins upon His shoulders and carried them to that hill at Calvary.  Our Saviour saved us from our sins by dying on the Cross for us.  With all of this in mind, it begs the question:  why do we do what we do . . . . especially when we supposedly know better?  How often do we do something really stupid and then we say out loud to ourselves:  "Why did I do that?"  St. Paul is saying to the Ephesians just like he is saying to us:  "You used to be ignorant of your sins but now you have knowledge in Christ . . . you are knowledgeable of Our Lord . . .  you know about Him . .    you know His ways . .  . you know Him . . . . now, act like Him and do not go back to your former, sinful ways."  This, in essence, is what St. Paul was saying to the church at Ephesus and what he is saying to us.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, March 8th, 2015 as we gather together to worship Our Blessed Saviour.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time and then stay with us after Mass as we share fellowship and goodies at the coffee hour.

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.


Second Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 1st, 2015

In the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear the story of Our Blessed Saviour meeting the woman of Canaan who besought Our Lord seeking favour for her daughter.  Now keep in mind that this woman was not Jewish, and yet she said to Our Lord: "Thou Son of David: my daughter is grievously vexed with a devil." (St Matthew 15:22)  Right from the beginning, it is evident that this woman must have recognized the greatness of Our Lord or else she would not have referred to Him as "Thou Son of David."  Now, we have all heard this story because Our Lord at first  . .. .. it seems .  .  .. that He ignores her because He says not a word at her first request.  After that it is apparent that she then proceeds to bother the disciples for her request because St. Matthew informs us that they "besought Him, saying, Send her away: for she crieth after us." (v.23)  After this, Our Lord still ignores her request by basically saying, in essence, that He was sent for the children of Israel.  And despite all of this, this woman still persisted until finally Our Lord recognized her persistence and her faith when He said:  " O woman, great is thy faith: be it unto thee even as thou wilt." (v.28)

Now the point that we can all learn from this is to be determined and to have faith.  The woman of Canaan had both.  She recognized Our Lord to be the source of help and healing for her daughter.   But she was also determined.  In faith, we need to be determined.  But we need to be determined for the right reason.  In other words, sometimes we only get "religious" when we need God for something:  We want to get hired for a new job.  We need a favour of some sort.  We need guidance to get our of a jam.   Now there is nothing wrong with going to Our Heavenly Father when we need His assistance.  What is wrong, though, is when we ONLY go to Him when we need something and forget about Him the rest of the time.  A lot of people only go to God when they get into a jam or when they need something.  They suddenly get real "religious" when they are in need but the rest of the time they act as if there is no God.  Our Lord came to offer us Salvation.  He came to die on the Cross for us.  But He also spent some thirty-three years on this earth being a human being like you and I.  He knows what it is like to walk in your shoes.  He knows what it is like to laugh and to cry.  He knows what it is like to work and to rest. He knows what it is like to walk in your shoes as a human being.  As such, we can go to Him on a daily basis and we should go to Him on a daily basis.  Do not just go to God when you are in need of something.  Go to God every day with your concerns, your joys, your sorrows, your everything.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and receive His Precious Body and Blood in Holy Communion.



First Sunday of Lent, Sunday, February 22nd, 2015

The Gospel passage which we will hear on the First Sunday of Lent comes to us from the Fourth Chapter of St. Matthew.  Here, St. Matthew describes Our Lord's Forty Days in the Wilderness.  As we all know, the devil likes to take every opportunity he can to take advantage.  This is no exception.  He tries three separate times to take advantage and tempt Our Blessed Saviour while He is fasting.  Finally, the Lord  admonishes the devil by telling him:  "Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve." (v.10)   After this, we are told, the devil left Him and "angels came and ministered unto Him." (v. 11)  There are two major points that we can take away from this:

First, Our Lord was fasting for forty days and forty nights and during this time, the devil came to tempt Him.  How many of us have sat down to pray, or sat down to read the Bible, or tried to concentrate while we were in church and every thought comes into our head:  we start thinking about what we're going to eat for lunch; we start thinking about something we should have done at home;  we start thinking about a movie or a TV show; etc.  I am sure this has happened to all of us at one point or another.  The point is this:  if the devil is bold enough to tempt Our Blessed Saviour, he is certainly bold enough to tempt you and I.  Some people let these distractions over-power them and keep them from prayer completely.  They take these "distractions" as some sort of a "sign" that they weren't meant to pray or that they can't pray.  If this happens, the devil has won.  Don't give the devil the victory.  Remember always that the devil will stop at nothing in order to keep you from growing closer to God.  If the devil can tempt Our Blessed Saviour, he will certainly tempt you as well.  Don't let the temptation stop you in your tracks.  Tell the devil who is in charge of your life and then move on!

The second point is that the devil will try to tempt us with things that are attractive to us, that are appealing to us.  He will tempt us with things that we would want and desire to begin with.  The devil will use any tool necessary to tempt you and I.  He will use food and drink; he will use power and money; he will use position and title.  Any of these things mentioned are not necessarily bad in and of themselves, but if they keep us away from God or if they stand as a barrier between us and God, then this is what makes them bad.  Also, many of these things that the devil tempts us with, we end up "worshiping" those things instead of God.  For example, how many people end up focusing on drink instead of God.  How many people focus all of their energies on gaining more and more power or more and more money?  In that example, that person worships money or power and never thinks about God.  Again, the devil does not want you to have a relationship with God.  He will use anything and everything to keep you from having a relationship with Our Blessed Saviour.

We need to counter these temptations by keeping our eyes fixed on Christ.  Always go towards Him and do not let any temptation . . . .  no matter how wonderful it seems . . . . prohibit you from having a good relationship with God.  Give God your heart.  Let Him be the ruler of your life.  Don't let "things" rule your life:  whether they be food, drink, power, riches, etc.  God should be the ruler of our hearts.

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, February 22nd, 2015.  Join us as we take time out of our busy schedule and worship God as His family.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  We hear God speaking to us through His Precious Word.  We receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time so that we can be nourished and strengthened.

Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Quinquagesima, (Sunday before Lent), 
Sunday, February 15th, 2015

In the Mass for Quinquagesima, the Gospel reading is from the 18th Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel.  In this passage, St. Luke relates the story of when Our Blessed Saviour was travelling with His disciples and they encountered the blind man as they went towards Jerusalem.  It is interesting to note that as they were travelling, Our Lord was foretelling what would happen to Him in regards to the Passion and His Resurrection.  But St. Luke points out:  "And (the disciples) understood none of these things . . . ."  But as Our Lord and His disciples were coming close to Jericho, St. Luke tells us that a "certain blind man" found out amid the noise and commotion that Our Lord was approaching and he yelled and yelled in order to gain Our Lord's attention.  The more he yelled, the more they told him to be quiet . . . . the more they told him to be quiet, the more he yelled.  Finally, Our Lord had the blind man to be brought to Him.  Our Lord asked the man what he wanted and the blind man responded:  "Lord, that I may receive my sight." (St. Luke 18: 41)  Immediately, Our Lord healed the man and cured his blindness.  It is interesting to note that despite the fact that the man was blind and was unable to see physically with his eyes,  . . . .  he was able to "see" with his heart.  He might not have been able to see Our Lord with his eyes, but he saw Our Lord with his heart.  He knew that Our Lord was the Messiah in his heart despite the fact that he could not see Him with his eyes.  Each one of us need to be able to "see" Jesus the same way that the blind man saw Him.  The blind man referred to Our Lord as "Son of David," a Jewish way of saying for "Messiah."  He knew this without actually seeing Him physically but was able to come to this conclusion through what he felt in his heart.  Faith pertains to things not seen with the eyes, necessarily, but "seeing" things with our heart.  Each one of us has to be convinced that Jesus is the Lord of our life; that He is the Messiah; that He is the Son of God; that He is our Saviour . .. .  .  we discover these things not by what we see physically with our eyes, . . . rather, we are convinced of these things through our heart.   Make Christ the ruler of your heart.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, February 15th, 2015 as we celebrate the last Sunday before Lent:  Quinquagesima.  Join us as we gather together to hear the Word of God found both in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  And then stick around after Mass for our Coffee Hour.

St. Margaret worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM



Sexagesima, (Second Sunday Before Lent), 
Sunday, February 8th, 2015

On Sunday, February 8th, 2015 in the Gospel for Sexagesima (Second Sunday before Lent), we hear about seed falling on different types of ground.  The passage that we are referring to comes to us from St. Luke 8:4-14.  And Our Blessed Saviour was speaking to a lot of people but when he was finished His disciples wanted to know exactly what each of His examples meant.  Here, Our Lord explains directly to them that the "seed" represented the Word of God and that this same Word gets planted among different types of soil or ground:  some of the seed as it was sown by the sower in the story got devoured by the birds; some of it fell on rocky ground; some of the seed got thrown in among the thorns; and, finally, some fell on good ground.  Trying not to get too awfully philosophical here but as I like to point out:  life is never perfect.  Sometimes it is easy-going; sometimes it is difficult; sometimes, life presents challenges to us; sometimes, life is boring; sometimes it is exciting, etc.  But no matter what challenges life presents us with, the one constant in our life should be God, first and foremost.  Even when we become Christians, we are not promised that life will be easy.  We are not promised that we will never have any problems.  We are not promised that we will never have any concerns in life.  What we are promised is that when we do have a loving, committed, personal relationship with Our Lord, we are promised that He will never leave us.  The point being is that throughout our life, going back to the parable of the sower, sometimes our life will seem as rocky ground; sometimes it will seem as filled with thorns; and sometimes it will seem like it is simply good ground for planting.  Let the Word of God be planted in you,  . .  .  .  in your heart.  Let your heart be the good ground that Our Lord was referring to.  Let the Word of God be planted so deeply in your heart that nothing can never take it away from you.  Let that Word of God grow in your heart so that you will become committed like never before to Our Blessed Saviour.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday at 9:30 AM.  We gather together at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Lord and dedicate time out of our busy week and give that time to God.  And, after Mass, stick around for some delicious goodies and fellowship at our coffee hour.



Septuagesima, (Third Sunday Before Lent), 
Sunday, February 1st, 2015

On Sunday, February 1st, 2015, the Church celebrates Septuagesima Sunday . . .  or the Third Sunday Before Lent . . .  The "Gesima Sundays" are the final countdown, if you will, or the three Sundays of preparation for the holy season of Lent. The Gospel for today's Mass comes to us from the Twentieth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Matthew.  In this Chapter, St. Matthew recalls the words of Our Lord in regards to the householder who hired laborers to work in his vineyard.  And the householder went out at various points throughout the day to hire laborers to come and work in his vineyard.  And at the end of the day each of the laborers got paid the same exact wage whether they worked the whole day or just the last hour of the day.  God invites those whom He chooses to invite.  But the key is that it is up to us to accept or decline the invitation.  The very end of the passage that we heard today ends with:  " . .  .  for many be called, but few chosen ."  (St. Matthew 20:16)  I speak to so many people and it's the same thing for most people:  they are involved in a whole host of activities.  Just think about all the different "hats" that you may or may not have in your own life:  worker; homeowner; spouse; parent; neighbor; volunteer; friend; customer; etc.  The list could go on and on.  But I talk to so many people who have been chosen to work on a special committee or who have been chosen to be in charge of a special project of one sort or another.  Even at work, we get chosen by our boss or our manager to be in charge of something.  Throughout our life, all of us can think of one example or another where we have been chosen.  God has chosen His people as well.  "For thou art an holy people unto the Lord Thy God: the Lord Thy God hath chosen thee to be a special people unto Himself, above all the people that are upon the face of the earth."  (Deuteronomy 7:6)  We are chosen by God to be a "special people" unto Him.  We must never forget that.  God has chosen YOU!  It is up to us whether or not we accept the invitation.  Remember who you are:  You are "special"; You are "chosen" You are "loved."  I do not think that most of us realize the importance of this fact.  If we did, we would spend more time focused on the things above as opposed to being focused on the things here below.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers together each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we gather together as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour.  And, at Communion time, we come forward to receive His Precious Body and Blood so that we can be nourished for the journey ahead.



Conversion of Saint Paul, Sunday, January 25th, 2015

The Epistle for today's Mass, the Feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul, is taken from the Ninth chapter of the Acts of the Apostles.  In this chapter, we hear about how St. Paul, formerly known as Saul, was on a mission.  His mission was to search for all those who were practicing Christians in the new church founded by Our Lord.  We hear where Saul had sought the necessary paperwork from the high priest in order to bring back any Christians bound unto Jerusalem.  So, as we see, Saul was certainly on a mission.  But as is often the case in life, things don't always go exactly as planned.  And as St. Paul was nearing Damascus, we hear the following:  " .  . .  .  and suddenly there shined round about him a light from heaven: and he fell to the earth  . . . "  (Acts 9:3-4)  Saul fell to the earth, we are told.  Often in life we can think of times where we have fallen.  No, I'm not speaking of physically falling, although especially at this time of year it would be easy to do so on icy sidewalks or driveways.  No, I am referring to the fact that sometimes we have to be brought back down to earth for us to face reality.  Sometimes in life we get just a little bit too "high and mighty" and we think we are better than everyone else or we think that we have everything in control or that it is us that is in charge of everything.  And, as a result, a fall back to earth turns out to be a good reality check for us.  I can think of times, personally, where I was at "rock-bottom" in life and it helped me to truly appreciate the blessings that I do have in life.  Even, as a nation, we can think of tragic events in our history where we were brought low and helped people to do a reality check and keeping us humble.  In that sense, the tragic event was turned into something good.  Not too terribly long ago, as a nation, we experienced the tragic events of 9-11 and I have heard countless stories over the years that many people were so affected by those events that they ended up searching for God and came back to church.  Sometimes, unfortunately, it takes a tragic event or a  humbling experience to "put us in our place," to humble us, to put things into reality.  Certainly, this was the case for St. Paul.  He was humbled to the point that "he fell to the earth" but in rising he became a new man.  In being laid low, he acknowledged that it was the Lord that was truly in charge and not "Saul."  In being "knocked down," he ultimately became stronger and became reliant on God and not on himself. Sometimes we need to fall to the earth as well so that we will have a reminder of humility.  "And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted." (St. Matthew 23:12)

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church gathers for Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the beautiful King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come worship God in a beautiful, traditional worship where not only does God feed you through His Word but He also feeds you at Communion time through His Most Precious Body and Blood.  Take an hour out of your week and dedicate that hour solely to God.  God, Who has given you so much, certainly deserves at least an hour out of your week, doesn't He?




Second Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 18th, 2015

The Gospel for the Mass from the Second Sunday after Epiphany comes to us from the very beginning of St. Mark's Gospel.  And it makes sense that St. Mark writes here at the beginning of his Gospel by speaking about St. John the Baptist.  We hear:  "Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee." (St. Mark 1:1)   St. Mark is quoting this verse from the Old Testament book of Malachi  to describe St. John the Baptist:  "Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me . . . ." (Malachi 3:1)  It is entirely appropriate that St. Mark would use this Scripture verse in reference to St. John the Baptist.  St. John did in fact prepare the way by preaching and speaking and telling about the Messiah Who was to come after him.  Very often, in our own life, it is through the introduction of other people that we get introduced to our friends.  Perhaps it is through a friend of a friend; or a cousin of a coworker; or a business acquaintance; etc.  The point being that we end up having a friendship with someone through being introduced to him or her by someone else.  And, if not for this introduction, we would most certainly have never met that person.  St. John the Baptist did just this:  he introduced countless souls to Our Blessed Saviour.  He did, in fact, prepare the way of the Lord through his preparation of preaching and baptizing and preaching.  Each of  us should follow the example of St. John the Baptist by preparing the way for the Lord.  We do this by introducing others around us to Jesus.  How do we introduce others to Our Blessed Saviour?  We do this in various ways:  speaking about our relationship with God; talking about what we read in Scripture; inviting others to come to church with us; acting with love towards others; and even praying for others that God will bless them.  There are many wonderful ways to prepare the way before Our Lord.  This reminds me of one of my all-time favorite quotations.  St. Francis said:  "Preach at all times, and sometimes even use words!"

You can join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible.  We also use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We gather together as God's Family to worship Him and to be nourished by Him:  He nourishes us first through His Word; and then He nourishes us by His Most Precious Body and Blood during Holy Communion.  Take some time out of your busy schedule and make some time for God this week.

St. Margaret of Scotland church worships each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  You can join us for Mass by joining us in the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us for Mass and stay afterward for our Coffee Hour.





First Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 11th, 2015

As we celebrate the First Sunday after Epiphany, we turn to St. Luke's Gospel (St. Luke 2:42 ff) to hear the story of the finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple:  ". . . . they turned back again to Jerusalem, seeking him."  You see, the Holy Family was traveling to Jerusalem for the Feast of the Passover.  And when they had stayed there the days that were required, as St. Luke reminds us, they left to go back home.  While they were traveling, they discovered that the Child Jesus was not with them.  I am sure that just about all parents have experienced at the very least a small bit of anxiety when they find out that their child is not where he or she is supposed to be.  Whether it is during a trip to the mall or the local grocery store, etc., we turn around and little Johnnie or Susie is not behind us.  And we panic just long enough to discover our child over in the candy aisle.  Anyway, in that light, we can imagine the panic that came over Our Lady and St. Joseph when they discovered, much to their horror that the Child Jesus was not in their company.

Truth be known, we normally do not begin to look for something until we discover that the item is missing.  For example, when we are trying to leave the house to go to work or to an appointment and then suddenly we discover that the car keys are not where we thought we left them.  And then we panic because we don't want to be late and we need to find the car keys.  Any item that you can think of . . . . the remote control,  .   . . . the shirt that you wanted to wear . . ..  even the "missing" mate to a sock that you have just taken out of the dryer . . . . where, oh, where did it go?!?!?  Obviously, we don't search for things or items until we know that we are in need of them and suddenly realize that we don't know where the item is.  e.g., the lost car keys.  And only then do we make a point to go search for them.  I would contend that this is how it is in regards to our search for Jesus.  So many people do NOT search Him out because they do not know that they are missing Him.  This is because their minds are caught up in the things of the world:  their material possessions; their money; their pleasures; their food; their drink; etc.  They are too busy concerning themselves with the cares of the world that they don't have time to "search out" Jesus.  We do not make a point to search for something until we realize it is missing or realize that we need it.  Let each of us make the point to realize our need for Jesus and then search for Him until we find Him and never let Him go.

Mass is offered each and every Sunday at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we gather together as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour.  And, at Communion time, we come forward to receive His Precious Body and Blood so that we can be nourished for the journey ahead.



Second Sunday after Christmas, Sunday, January 4th, 2015

In the Gospel for today's Mass (St. Matthew 2:19 ff) we begin where we left off last week.  Remember, last week we commemorated the Feast of the Holy Innocents and we heard also from St. Matthew where St. Joseph was warned in a dream to go to Egypt because Herod wanted to do harm to the Child Jesus.  This week we "fast-forward" to when Herod had died and the angel, just as he promised, told St. Joseph in a dream to take his family back into Israel from Egypt. We hear the following:  St Joseph  " . . . .   being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside  .  . .  "  And as a result ended up in Nazareth, where the Child Jesus was raised.  The reason St. Joseph "turned aside" was because even though he was sure Herod was dead, he was still afraid of Archelaus, the son of Herod.  This fear of St. Joseph seems perfectly understandable, considering the circumstances.  It is better to be safe than sorry, as the old saying goes.  But the point in this:  all of us can come up with examples in our lives where we have "turned aside" from where we wanted to go . . . or where we were expecting to go . . . . or where we thought we would go.  If we look back over the course of our life, I am sure that not every single factor in our life was planned out or even expected.  In fact, you know as well as I, that sometimes life throws us a "curve-ball" that was totally unexpected:  loss of a job; illness; unexpected emergency; etc.  And due to unforeseen circumstances, we, like St. Joseph and the Holy Family, might have to "turn aside" from where we thought we were going.  In life we do not follow a straight road our entire life.  If we did, life might be pretty boring when you think about it.  But if we look back over the course of our life, we'll soon discover that the road we have been travelling on is filled with all kinds of twists and turns and diversions and pit-stops, etc.  And very often, as I say, we have probably had to "turn aside" a time or two when we didn't plan to or did not even want to.  But for the Christian, the person who takes his or her Christian faith seriously, the one constant in life is our relationship with God.   Even when you have to unexpectedly "turn aside," make sure God is with you and everything will be fine.  Learn from St. Joseph:  take Jesus with you and never forsake Him and He will never forsake you.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, January 4th, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret worships in the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Worship Our Heavenly Father with us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.  And after Mass is over, please stay for some delicious refreshments at our coffee hour.



Feast of the Holy Innocents, Sunday, December 28th, 2014

In the Gospel for today's Mass (St. Matthew, Chapter two) coming in commemoration of the Feast of the Holy Innocents, the scene unfolds before us painted by St. Matthew:  The angel appears in a dream to St. Joseph and tells him in no uncertain terms to take Our Lady and the Child Jesus and said to him:  "Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and flee into Egypt . . . ."  The reason for this urgency is because Herod was "exceeding wroth:"  "Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth, and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem . . . . "  All this is found in today's Gospel passage coming from the second chapter of St. Matthew.  St. Joseph did as he was directed by the angel and fled into Egypt along with St. Mary and the Child Jesus.   St. Joseph is always such a good teacher for us.  In this case, the lesson that we can learn from St. Joseph is to always take God with you no matter where you are going.  You see, if we get into the habit of having God with us wherever we go, we will always be in good company no matter the situation we find ourselves in.  In this case, St. Joseph was in the company of Our Lady and the Child Jesus.  What better company could he have chosen?  We are known by the company that we keep.  Thus, if we get in the habit of keeping company with Our Blessed Saviour, we know that He will never steer us wrong.  Our Saviour makes the best company, . . .  the best friend,  . . . the best counselor,  . . .  When we get in the habit of travelling always with Our Blessed Saviour we know, without any shadow of a doubt, that we will always go in the direction that He wants us to go in.  Even when danger or trial or tribulation faces us, just as it did in today's Gospel passage, take God as your travelling companion.  He will always keep you close to Him and never leave you alone.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, December 28th, 2014 as we celebrate the Feast of the Holy Innocents.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God, as found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we listen to God speaking to us and hear what He is saying to each one of us.  Join us as we gather as God's family and worship God and then receive Him at Communion time in the Precious Body and Precious Blood!



Fourth Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 21st, 2014

Human beings seem to exaggerate at times.  This is their way of making a point or to emphasize something.  For example, if you are anything like me you might say something like:  "I am ALWAYS looking for my car keys!"   . . .  . or  .. . . . "I am ALWAYS paying bills!" . . . . or  . . . . "I am ALWAYS doing laundry!"   . . . .  or . .. . "The Cubs are ALWAYS in last place!"  Well, you get the point.  We say to ourselves or to others that we are "always" doing something to emphasize that we are constantly doing something"  "I'm ALWAYS tripping over that rug!"  Well, in today's epistle from Philippians 4:4 ff, we hear:  "Rejoice in the Lord always and I again I say rejoice!"  This is certainly good advice for us human beings because, it seems to me, that we are a complaining bunch.  We like to either complain about our lot in life or focus on the negative.  Now, don't get me wrong, certainly if we look around there are things to complain about:  unemployment . . .  bills . . . . family or loved ones being sick . . . . crime . . . . the Cubs ALWAYS being in last place . . . . etc.  You get the idea.  Yes, if we make the point to look for negative things in general or specifically in our own life we will find them.  But if this is true, then the "opposite" would be true as well:  we need to make a point to look for the positive things in our life as well.  Just as there are negative things that we could find in our life, there are just as many . . .  . . no, there are more  . . . .  positive things we could find in our life, if we only make a point to look for them.  And when we find them, we should rejoice in them.

Advent is a season of anticipation, of preparation . . .  We are anticipating the coming of the Christ Child.  We are preparing for His birth on Christmas day.  But, unfortunately, our society has turned the month or so prior to Christmas into anticipating what gifts we will be getting or preparing for what stores to shop in and spend our money at.  While this is very nice, I'm sure, it also has caused great stress among people in regards to worrying about what to buy and anxiety over how to pay the bills.  A relationship with God gives us something to truly rejoice in . . . . a personal relationship with our Loving Saviour gives us something to truly be thankful for . . . . a personal relationship with our Heavenly Father gives us something to look forward to in life.    There is enough negative things that try to control our life.  Let's make the effort to focus more on the positive things in our life.  And the first thing that we should focus on is that God loves us and that Our Blessed Saviour forgave our sins by dying on the Cross for us.  This alone should cause us to  . . .  "Rejoice in the Lord always!"

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Come join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and listen to His Word found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.



Third Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 14th, 2014
(Gaudete Sunday)

In the Eleventh Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel in today's Mass, we hear Our Lord responding to the question of two disciples of St. John the Baptist.  The question that they asked Our Lord is whether or not He is the Messiah or should we continue looking for another?  Our Lord answers the question by emphasizing on what they have seen with their own eyes is the answer:  ". . . . the blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached to them "  Again, Our Lord is not answering the question with mere words, He is showing them the answer through His actions and what He does, not merely what He says.  And further on in the same chapter, Our Lord describes St. John the Baptist and in so doing, says to the crowd in regards to St. John:    "But what went ye out for to see?'

In both responses, the emphasis seems to be on "seeing" or "what we saw."   Sometimes, seeing is believing, as the old saying goes.  But even then, even when we see it with own eyes, it may not be exactly what we wanted to see.  Sometimes, what we see is not what we expected to see or not what we wanted to see, necessarily.  Certainly, in the case of St. John the Baptist, we could say: what you see is what you get.  In other words, St. John was a "straight-shooter" when it came to preaching the things of God.  He wasn't fancy, he wasn't necessarily well-dressed, he did not mince his words when it came to repentance.  And, yet, he got his point across and the people loved him.  In a similar way, as we have discussed in the past, Our Lord was a "mystery" to so many because on the one hand, He was not what they were expecting the Messiah to be.  They wanted the Messiah to be someone of great power and great authority.  They wanted someone who came leading a great and powerful army.  But what they saw with their own eyes was a simple carpenter from Nazareth preaching peace and love and forgiveness.

The important lesson for us as Christians, it seems to me, is this:  "Actions do speak louder than words . . . ."  In both examples of St. John the Baptist and Our Blessed Saviour, yes, by all means, they both spoke wonderful words in regards to the Kingdom of God.  And yet what they did, how they acted, the way that they treated people,  .   . . . . in other words, their actions spoke for them.  How many times have we met someone who has told us one thing but then turned right around and did the opposite?  In that example, their words meant nothing.  As mentioned above, Our Lord answered the two disciples of St. John the Baptist by telling them to look at what they saw with their own eyes.  Our actions need to match up with the words coming out of our mouth.  In other words, it's more important to show that we are Christians by the way that we live, how we treat people, and how we live our lives rather than simply telling people that we are Christians.  Hearing it is one thing but seeing it with our own eyes takes it to a whole other level.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, December 14, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the Third Sunday of Advent or Gaudete Sunday.  Please join us as we listen to the Word of God and hear what God is speaking to each one of us.  Join us as we worship God together as God's family and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.



Second Sunday of Advent, December 7th, 2014

" . . . . but My words shall not pass away . . ." (St. Luke 21:25 ff)  It is interesting to look either in books or on websites or see stories in newspapers, for example, about old stores or restaurants that we remember from when we were younger.  I had the opportunity to see a picture of a store recently on the internet that I had completely forgotten about.  Seeing that picture allowed me to remember something that had been long forgotten by me, quite frankly.  Having the experience of seeing something long forgotten sometimes causes us to question why it went out of business to begin with.  But there could be many reasons or many combinations of reasons why something did or did not last.  This applies to fashion styles, ways of doing things, in addition to businesses.  Things last when people make a point to keep them around is the answer, it seems to me.

When something is important to us, we make a point to take care of it, to look after it, to foster care for it.  Whether it is our home, or our car, or something as simple as a favorite book.  If it holds a lot of value, we will make a point to take care of it and know exactly where it is.  This is not just limited to actual physical items.  This can apply to non-tangible things such as habits or ways of doing things or ways of thinking.
In the Twenty-First chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Lord predicting how Jerusalem and the things in and around Jerusalem would be destroyed.  He says:  " . . .  the days will come, in the which there shall not be left one stone upon another . . . ."  (v. 6)  When we go through neighborhoods of our youth and we see how much things have changed, we sometimes get a little emotional, it confuses us why things of our youth have gone away.  But despite the fact that Our Lord described all of the changes that would take place, He also emphasized that His words would never pass away.  There are two ways for us to look at this.  Number one, Our Lord's words will not pass away because His words are Truth, first and foremost.  But, number two, His words will not pass away because we will not allow them to pass away.  We have take care of things that are important to us or they will go away eventually.  This is even true of ideas or beliefs.  We need to keep Our Lord's words in our hearts or they will be forgotten.  We have to remember what Our Lord said by first paying attention to what He said and then to put those words into practice.  "My words will not pass away . . . ."  No, they won't but we still need to make the point to pay attention to those words and to put those words into practice in our lives.

Please join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, December 7th, 2014 as we celebrate the Second Sunday of Advent.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM and is celebrated at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



First Sunday of Advent, Sunday, November 30th, 2014

This weekend the Church celebrates the liturgical "New Year" because we celebrate the First Sunday of Advent this weekend.  Advent, if you will, is the "count-down" towards Christmas.  Now, in the secular world, the count-down towards "Black Friday" has come and gone and that is all some people care about.  But as nice as it is both to shop and to also receive nice presents come Christmas time, the Church has provided the holy season of Advent to help keep us focused on the "Real Reason for the Season:"  the Blessed Christ Child and His coming into the world as the Messiah of the world.

In the Thirteenth Chapter of the Letter to the Romans, we hear the following:  " OWE no man any thing, but to love one another . . . ."  Then St. Paul goes on to say that if we love one another we have fulfilled the law (Chapter 13:8)  This advice seems pretty simple and yet pretty difficult at the same time: simple to follow in the examples of people that we love and are easy to love;  difficult because of the people that are just that:  "difficult" to get along with.  And, yet, St. Paul just like Our Blessed Lord, did not make a distinction between the two: those that are easy to love and those who are not so easy to love.  It's easy to love those that are good to us, that treat us well, that are fun and naturally happy.   It's easy to love those who do nice things for us and treat us nicely.  It's very easy to love people like that.  But as I say, St. Paul never made a distinction between how to treat nice people as opposed to how to treat not-so-nice people.  And I am not aware of Our Lord making a distinction, either.  In fact, in the sixth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Lord speaking:  "But I say unto you which hear, Love your enemies, do good to them which hate you, Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you." (vv 27-28)  And then He goes on to say:  "And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.  For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye?  for sinners also love those that love them.  And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye?  for sinners also do even the same."  (vv 31-32)  And, finally, Our Lord states plainly:  "But love ye your enemies, and do good and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest . . . " (v. 35)

We are indeed children of the Highest if we follow His commandments in our lives.  And following the commandments of God is sometimes pretty easy and straightforward.  But other times, following Our Lord can be a bit trickier like showing love to those whom we admittedly do not like very much.  But the Season of Advent is, first and foremost, a season of hope!  It is time spent waiting for the Messiah, waiting for the Messiah, waiting for the small Divine Infant Jesus, the One Who was sent to save the world.  This small innocent baby offers hope to the world, both the "good" and the "bad."  He offers love to the world, both the "good" and the "bad."  He offers forgiveness to the world, both the "good" and the "bad."  Our Lord does not make a distinction.  He offers His grace freely.  The only stipulation is that we must choose whether we accept His gift or not.  This Advent season, accept the gift that the Christ Child offers to you.  Make a place in your heart and make Him the ruler of your life.

The First Sunday of Advent Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, November 30th, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the beautiful Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Come join us as we worship Our Heavenly Father by listening to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.

Note:  Marquette Manor is now a gated community.  Please be aware that when coming to Marquette Manor, simply tell the guard at the entry gate to Marquette Manor that you are coming to the chapel for Mass.  Tell the guard that you are from St. Margaret's coming to attend Mass in the Chapel.  Thank you.




Sunday Next before Advent, Sunday, November 23rd, 2014

At the very beginning of the epistle from Mass for the Sunday Next before Advent we hear to following:  "BEHOLD, the days come, saith the LORD .  . . " (Jeremiah 23:5)  Our society is obsessed with upcoming events.  For example, this time every year, we get constant reminders about how close we are to Christmas, courtesy of all the department stores, retail stores, online book stores, etc.  Behold, the big sale is about to happen . . . . Behold, this sale won't last long . . .  Behold, come and spend your hard-earned money here so that your loved ones will be happy at Christmas time.  But these "reminders," in all fairness go on all year around, quite honestly.  We are reminded on the nightly news about the upcoming summits, or upcoming sessions of Congress, or when a bill is about to be voted on.  Even in our personal life, we have to deal with upcoming reports at our jobs being due, and upcoming doctor's appointments, and things to do around the house:  whether they be preparing the house for winter or getting ready for an upcoming dinner.  So, you see, we are constantly reminded of upcoming events and the days ahead . . .

But this is not what Jeremiah wants us to think about.   In the "reminders" that I mentioned above, they are concerned with earthly, material things.  And nothing is necessarily wrong with with the things that I mentioned:  it's good to give gifts as a token of affection to loved ones;  it's good to prepare your home for the winter; it's good for politicians to do their job, etc.  But we have to keep everything in perspective of what is important.  Jeremiah continues:  "BEHOLD, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will raise unto David a righteous Branch, and a King shall reign and prosper, and shall execute judgment and justice in the earth"    We need to be concerned with the coming of the Lord as Christians.  We need to concern ourselves with making a place ready for Him when He comes.  And, quite frankly, we can make that happen now!  Yes, we can prepare our hearts for Him and prepare a place in our heart for Our Blessed Lord.  You see, all of the daily routines in life have their place: the daily chores, preparation of meals, going to work, paying bills, etc.  But there is one more daily "chore," and it should not even be called a "chore,"  it would be better described as a "daily necessity,"   . . . . and this "daily necessity" is time spent with Our Lord and preparing  a place for Him in our hearts!  As we come upon the liturgical season of Advent, the Church prepares for the coming of the Lord as a small innocent Infant.  Let us also prepare our hearts for the coming of that small Divine Infant by making a place for Him to dwell.  Get to know Jesus.  Give Him your heart because He has already given His Sacred Heart to you!

Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, November 23rd, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  Please mark your calendars and plan to join with us at Mass.  Come hear the Word of God proclaimed!  Come hear God speaking directly to you!  Come join your brothers and sisters in Christ as we gather together to worship Our Heavenly Father!  And join us as we receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Saviour at Communion time to help prepare us, to nourish us, to sustain us for the days to come!

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Twenty-First Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, November 9th, 2014

It is amazing to think about all the things that protect us in one form or another.  If we go outside and the weather is cold or chilly or rainy, we put on a jacket or a coat or a hat or a scarf to protect us from the elements.  If you listen to the TV or the radio, you will hear commercials telling you that you can take your car to the car wash in order to protect your car from rust.  We also try to protect our savings by having them secured in the right bank or the right 401 K.  Or we should protect our health by eating the right foods and avoiding the wrong ones.  So, we hear a lot about protecting ourselves or our belongings in one form or another.

In today's Epistle coming to us from the sixth chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians, we also hear about protecting ourselves:  "Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God."  In today's Epistle, we are told to protect ourselves by putting on the "armour of God."  It sounds like pretty good advice, if you ask me.  There are so many things that we need to do in order to protect our physical health, our homes, our jobs, etc.  But we also need to take into account that we need to protect ourselves spiritually as well.  If anything, it seems as though it would be more urgent to protect ourselves spiritually than even physically.  Our Lord stated:  "And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body . . . " (St. Matthew 10:28)  If you go through a bad neighborhood, known for a lot of crime, you make your efforts to be more vigilant and to protect yourself.  If you are leaving your home and going on a trip, you make sure that your home is protected.  You lock all the doors and windows.  You may even get your neighbors to check on your house while you are away.  The same is especially true for the protection of our souls.  We have to be vigilant, the Lord says, to keep our souls safe from those would kill us spiritually speaking.   In other words, be on guard against things that would tempt you from leaving God's side.  Protect yourself by knowing God's Word so that you can run to it in times of temptation.  We need to remember that the devil uses beautiful, exciting, attractive things to lure us away from God.  So we have to be extra careful that we are not being lured away from God by something the devil uses to tempt us.  Always make God the first priority in your life and everything else will fall into place.  As long as God is always number one in your life, the devil will not be able to tempt us with other things.  Put on the armour of God and protect yourself against the temptations of the world.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, November 9th, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass.  Come hear the Word of God and be fortified and strengthened.  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.  St. Margaret worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



All Souls Day, Sunday, November 2nd, 2014

The Church always celebrates All Saints Day on November 1st and All Souls Day the next day on November 2nd.  Even though these two feasts are celebrated with the express purpose of remembering those who have gone before us . . . . whether they be the Saints of the Church or our dear loved ones who have meant so much in our lives, we always remember them throughout the whole year.  You see, when a priest says Mass, he offers up the intentions of himself, the parish and the Church at large.  I think that you would agree with me that it is not so easy to forget the people that have made a difference in our lives.  Each one of us can come up with an example or two . .. or five . . . or ten . . . or twenty . . . of people who have truly meant something to you and has changed your life for the better.  Whether it be the case of your parents, if they are deceased, or other family members such as aunts and uncles, or teachers, or neighbors, or friends.  The list goes on and on.  Each one of us can think of people that have touched our lives in a positive way.  It is those dear souls that we remember on All Souls Day.  I heard a long time ago a saying that goes something like this:  "As long as someone remembers you, your memory will always be alive."  I don't remember where I heard it . . . . in a movie or a TV show, probably . . .  but I always agreed with that thought.  We touch the lives of people during our life and our legacy lives on through the lives that we touch.  This is true, specifically, of parents passing down their values to their children.  But it can also be said of spouses.  And we could say it of friends and neighbors and coworkers.  All of us can come up with a list of people that have touched our lives and have given of themselves to us while they lived.  And, as a result, we carry that person with us not only through the memories we have of them but also of what they have taught us through their examples of how they lived.

Please join us for All Souls Day on Sunday, November 2nd, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we remember all the loved ones that have gone before us.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the beautiful chapel, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God, found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  Hear the Word of God spoken to you and then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time.



Feast of Christ the King, Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Please feel free to click on the following link to hear Fr. Todd's latest sermon which was preached on the Feast of Christ the King, Sunday, October 26th, 2014:



Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 19th, 2014

The beginning of today's Epistle states:  "I thank my God always on your behalf . . . "  (I Corinthians 1:4 ff)  Here, St. Paul is making the point that he thanks God for the witness of faith found in the Church at Corinth.   It is amazing how many times in a day that we say "Thank you."  Have you ever tried to count the number of times that you said these two simple little words in the course of a day?  Probably not but I bet you say it a lot.  If you go to the store and you buy something, the odds are probably good that you say "Thank you" to the cashier after making your purchase.  If someone holds the door for you on the way out, again, the odds are probably good that you once again say "Thank you" to the person showing the courtesy of holding the door for you.  If the waiter takes your order . . .  if the server brings you your drink  . . . . if someone says "God bless you" after you sneeze . . .  I would be willing to bet that you probably said "Thank you" at  each one of these scenarios I just described.   If you have ever worked in the customer service field like I have, you get in the habit of saying "Thank you" a lot!

But how often do we say "Thank you" to God?  As demonstrated above, the odds are that we thank an awful lot of people in the course of a day, week, or month.  But how often have we thanked God during the last 24 hours . . . or week . . .  or month?  Have we thanked Him at all?  We are awfully quick to speak to God when we need something from Him but is that the only time we ever take the time to speak to Him?  When we need a favour?   If we had a friend that only spoke to us when he/she needed something from us, over time, I doubt if we would think very highly of that so-called friend.  And yet that is what we do to God at certain times during our life.  We get busy with the "busy-ness" of everyday living and we do not take time out for God:  to spend time with Him  . . .  . to talk with Him ... . to thank Him.  And then when we get in trouble over one thing or another, then we run to Him and ask Him to help us.  The bottom line is this:  God wants us to run to Him when we are in need.  He wants to help us.  And yet I am willing to bet that He would also like to hear from us for no other reason than to simply say "Hi" or to say "Thank you for the blessings you have given me this day."   Make a point to thank God for what He has given you.

Take some time out of your busy schedule and join us for Mass.  Take one hour out of your week and dedicate it solely to God.  Come join us as we hear the Word of God spoken to each one of us in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as take time out to worship Him and also to receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

Mass is celebrated each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Anglican Church.  Mass is held at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road.




Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 12th, 2014

In the Epistle to the Ephesians, beginning in the fourth chapter, we hear the following:  " . . . .  one Lord, one faith, one baptism . . . . "  Now, in my opinion, it seems so often in the society in which we live that we focus on what makes us different.  We are African-Americans; Hispanic-Americans; Asian-Americans; etc.  I also notice a lot of articles or new-stories focusing on the differences between men and women.  Men do things a certain way and women do things a completely different way.  Men think a certain way.  Women think a certain way.  And even in religion, we are constantly reminded on the differences between the various churches, the various denominations, the various liturgical styles, and so on.  If you look around, it's plain enough to find out about what separates us, what makes us different from one another.  But St. Paul is focusing on what unifies us as Christians:  " . . .  one Lord, one faith, one baptism. . . . . "   In this sense, St. Paul is focusing on what unifies us and not on what makes us different.  This unity is what defines us.  And this unity comes to us through being the children of Our Heavenly Father:  "One God and Father of all, Who is above all, and through all, and in you all." (Chapter 4: 6)  Obviously, we are all different in one way or another:  I like certain types of food and you prefer other types of food.  I like to go to bed early and get up early.  Someone else is a "night-owl" and likes to sleep in.  I like certain singers and certain types of music, and so on.  The list goes on and on in regards to what makes us different.  But in focusing on what we each have in common:  " .. . .  one Lord, one faith, one baptism . . . ." focusing on what unifies us helps us to focus on the source of our unity:  Our Heavenly Father.   And when we focus all of our attention on Him, the things that separate us become less important.  They become secondary.

Join us on Sunday, October 12th, 2014 at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church as we celebrate Mass and listen to the Word of God.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.

For more information, go to:
http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/




Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 5th, 2014

From St. Luke's Gospel, beginning in the seventh chapter, we hear about Our Lord travelling with some of His disciples and St. Luke reminds us that they witnessed a large procession regarding a man who had died, and as we learn, he was the only son of his mother.  "And when the Lord saw her, He had compassion on her . . . ."  This one statement is certainly very revealing in regards to the Lord that we serve.  There are multiple, numerous examples of Our Blessed Saviour taking notice of the concerns of the people around Him.  We think of the time in which He was speaking to the multitude and He noticed that they were hungry and tired and He fed them.  He was concerned about their long journey.  And Lord takes notice of us . . .  of our concerns . . .  of our needs.  Our Lord sees the things that concern us, that stress us, that cause us grief.  Our Lord is interested in our concerns and this is why He takes notice.  The bottom line is that we take notice of the things that concern us.  And that is the whole point.  Our Lord takes the time to notice our concerns because He loves us.  Period.  This is why we see examples of Our Lord being moved with compassion when He sees the widow who lost her son; this is why we see Our Lord moved with compassion when He sees that his followers are hungry and tired; this is why we see Our Lord moved with compassion when He saw that Lazarus had died.  Our Lord showed His compassion because He loves us.  Our Lord loves us so much that He came to be a human being so that He could walk in our shoes.  Our Lord loves us so much that He shows His love through care, compassion, and concern.  We, in turn, should learn from Our Lord's example and show the same to those around us.  But, first, we have to get in the habit of taking the time to notice.  Before we can show concern, we have to take time to notice and to look.

Please join us for Mass.  Take time out of your busy schedules to worship God.  Listen to the Word of God through the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  And receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

St. Margaret of Scotland Parish worships every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/


Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 28th, 2014

In the Epistle for today's Mass, we are listening to a section of St. Paul's sixth chapter of the Epistle to the Galatians.  In this section, St. Paul is trying to warn the young church at Galatia not to be swayed by false teachers, some of which were preaching and teaching and vying for followers.  St. Paul writes:  "But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ." (Galatians, Chapter 6:14).  As is usually the case, when we read statements in Holy Scripture, normally it is said/written for a reason.  St. Paul's words cited above are no different.  The reason why St. Paul said what he said was because there were certain false teachers only wanting to compel their followers to follow Jewish laws and customs.  In this case, they wanted the men to be circumcised in order to be "more Christian."  These false teachers were more interested in satisfying themselves than they were in serving Our Blessed Lord.  See verses 12 and 13 of this chapter:  " . . .  they constrain you to be circumcised; only lest they should suffer persecution for the Cross of Christ.  For neither they themselves who are circumcised keep the law; but desire to have you circumcised, that they may glory in your flesh."

St. Paul's point in this:  there is only one thing ultimately that has made a difference in the world . . . . a lasting difference, a permanent difference, if you will . . . and that is the fact that Our Lord was willing to give up His own life for you and for me. He paid the price for OUR sins.  And this is the only thing that will ultimately save us:  His Death on the Cross.  It is this one saving event in the history of the world that has made a permanent, lasting effect for all people: Christ died on the Cross to save you and me from our sins.  Nothing else we can do will save us from our sins, including circumcision, is the point that St. Paul is making.  St. Paul was not condemning the practice of circumcision.  In fact, just the opposite, he says further on this chapter:   ".  . .  .peace be on them, and mercy, and upon the Israel of God." (verse 16)  He is just making the point that signs and symbols and good works and good thoughts . . . .  all of these are fine but none of these will save us.  Only the Cross of Christ has the saving effect for all eternity.  Only Our Lord's Sacrifice on the Cross is the permanent solution to our sinful ways and lifestyle.  He died on the Cross to atone for OUR sins . . .not His! . . .  OUR sins and then He rose again on the third day so that we will have the opportunity to share eternal life with Our Heavenly Father.  We need to keep this thought in our minds each and every day.

So many times we place all of our hopes in things, or actions or events and we are positive that these things will make everything better for us . . . . "Oh, if I can only make it to the weekend, everything will be fine.  Let me make it through this week"  "If I could only get this upgraded computer, everything will go much better, and I could do more things, and it would run faster . . . ."  "If I could only get all of my chores done at the house, then I could  .. . . ."  You see, as human beings, we pin all of our hopes and obtaining certain things or reaching certain goals . . . . whether they be obtaining new jobs, or new homes, or the latest gadgets . . .  and we are sure that everything will be just fine if we only get this certain item.  And this seems to appease us only briefly until we get fixated on getting the next "must-have" item or the next earth-shattering event in our life.  But ultimately, none of these things matter in the course of eternity.  There is only one thing and one thing only that matters for us:  the fact that Christ was willing to die on the Cross to atone for your sins and mine.  That is the single solitary event in the history of the world whose effects are ever-lasting.  Everything else is just temporary.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church will gather together on Sunday, September 28th, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God, found both in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join with us as we gather as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father and to set aside a little bit of time out of our busy week in order to dedicate that time to Him!   And then, finally, come and receive Our Blessed Lord at Communion time.   Receive the Most Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour so that you can be nourished and find fulfillment in Him!

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday.




What Are You Hungry For?
By Fr. Todd Bragg

I was reading an article today where the heart of the article focused on the following premise:  what people are searching for and what they are getting (or not getting, as the case may be) when searching for churches.  The one quotation that caught my attention was  "I'm just not getting fed."  It's funny to think about the fact that if you have not had anything to eat for a while, your mind starts to dwell on that fact and nothing else.  We focus on everything that we might want to eat:  pizza . . .  Chinese food . . .  spaghetti . . . Mexican  . . .  . fast food . . . fried chicken . . . a sandwich . . . And we finally make the decision as to what exactly we want and once we do . . . that's it.  We fixate on the food of choice until we get it.  And then finally we eat and we are satisfied. 
As Christians, we also have to be fed on a daily basis.  The article that I was mentioning at the beginning of this short essay of sorts was focused on pastors needing to feed their flock with the Word of God.  And this is certainly the truth.  People are hungry for the Word of God.  They want to hear what God is saying to them.  But pastors, priests, ministers, bishops, etc. can only do so much in a given week.  What I mean is that time is limited in what the priest or pastor can talk about in a given week.  If the average church service is, say, an hour  . . . an hour and a half . . . how much of that time is strictly the preaching of the priest or minister?  Fifteen minutes?  Twenty minutes?  More?  Less?  As my congregation will let you know, I don't time my preaching  . . . . . I just start in and see where God is leading me!  But even with that, I might get twenty minutes of preaching in on a given Saturday evening or Sunday morning.  Think about it.  Twenty-four hours in a day.  Seven days in a week.  By my calculation, that is One-Hundred and Sixty-Eight hours in a given week and the preacher gets fifteen, twenty, maybe thirty minutes of preaching out of all those hours.  That's not much time in comparison.  So that's why I say, in essence what the preacher is doing is planting the seed and leaving the rest to God.  
One of my favorite Scripture passages is from First Kings.  It is the passage where the Prophet Elijah is fleeing from Jezebel and Elijah "went a day's journey into the wilderness, and came and sat down under a juniper tree: and he requested for himself that he might die: and said, it is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life: for I am not better than my fathers."  (I Kings 19:4) 
Then Elijah laid down and went to sleep and the angel of the Lord touched Elijah and "said unto him, Arise and eat."  (Verse 5)  And Elijah had seen where the angel of the Lord had placed there by his head water and food for him to eat.
And then Elijah laid down again,  . . . "And the angel of the Lord came again the second time, and touched him, and said, Arise and eat: because the journey is too great for thee."  (Verse 7)
This is certainly one of my all-time Scripture passages.  I think it is profound for a number of reasons: 
First,  God does indeed feed us.  He feeds us through the Word of God.  We Christians must be hungry for the Word of God.  In our society, there are so many different types of food to choose from:  pizza . . . Chinese food  . .  . Mexican food . . . fast-food . . . chicken . . . seafood . . . . etc.  Likewise, many people choose to get fed from different interests, desires, etc:  power, riches, money, fame, drugs, alcohol, etc.  People make choices where they eat and how they spend their time.  We, as Christians, have to make a choice as well:  we have to want to be fed by the Word of God.  And then make a point of studying the Word of God on a daily basis.  Get in the habit of reading the Bible every day. 
Secondly, God also feeds us through His Church.  God does not need our help but He desires us to help Him.  And as a result, He founded the Church here on earth.  And the Church distributes the Sacraments to the world.  And the Chief Sacrament is the Mass.  Come to Mass and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour.  Our Lord loves us so much that He gives of Himself so that we can be nourished.  "Arise and eat: because the journey is too great for thee!"  Our Lord wants us to receive of the Sacraments of the Church as a physical and spiritual reminder that He is alive and well in the world.  The Sacraments help nourish and sustain us in the long journey we call "life." 
God gives us nourishment but we have to go find it.  God gives us food but we have to make the effort to get it.  God provides spiritual food and drink for our journey but we have to make the effort to obtain it.  Get a relationship with God.  Make Him the Lord and Master of your life.  Get in the habit of reading the Bible on a daily basis.  And take advantage of the Sacraments.  The same Lord Who said:  "This is My Body, This is My Blood" is the same Lord Who is awaiting for us to come and worship Him, to come and listen to Him, to come and receive Him when we come to church.


To find out more about St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church, please visit:
http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/


To find out more about the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit, please visit:
http://anglicanholyspirit.blogspot.com/

Feast of St. Matthew, Sunday, September 21, 2014

In the Ninth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we are privy to a number of fascinating events.  We witness Our Lord healing a man "sick of the palsy," by saying:  "Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee."  This, in turn, causes the scribes to accuse Our Lord of blasphemy.  We are also witness to the calling of St. Matthew and Our Lord's invitation for St. Matthew, a tax collector,  when He says to St. Matthew:  "Follow Me."   St. Matthew did in fact follow Our Blessed Saviour but first he held a dinner at his house in Our Lord's honour.  At this dinner there were many "publicans and sinners," which sat down with Our Lord and His disciples.  Again, this caused the Pharisees to question the disciples why Our Saviour "eateth with publicans and sinners?"

If you ever take the time to notice . . . .  because, let's face it, some people not only do not take the time to notice, they could care less if they notice or not in the first place, but I digress . . .  again, if you ever take the time to notice, Our Lord is very direct in His response.  In other words, unlike us, when we are faced with difficult situations, we often beat around the bush instead of getting straight to the point.  Here, Our Lord responds:  "They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick."  (v. 12)  And He immediately follows this up by quoting Scripture when He says:  "But go ye and learn what that meanenth: I will have mercy; and not sacrifice"  Here, Our Blessed Saviour is quoting from I Samuel 15:22:  "And Samuel said: Hath the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices; as in obeying the voice of the Lord?  Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice"

What Our Lord was trying to show to the Pharisees . . . and to the publicans . . .  and to St. Matthew . . .  and to the sinners present . . . . that God prefers that we show an act of mercy to someone in need instead of any sort of religious worship.  Now, let us not fool ourselves into thinking that we suddenly can stop coming to church as long as we show mercy.  No, that is not what Our Lord is meaning.  He was simply pointing out that the Pharisees and the scribes, in general, were substituting worship for mercy.  In other words, He was pointing out that the Pharisees believed that as long as they stayed committed to their religious practices of keeping the Sabbath holy, they could treat anybody else with contempt and look down their noses at a person the other days of the week.

Is that really, when you think about it, any different from our own day and age?  Lots of folks get all dressed up and go to church on Sunday and then the rest of the week, it's as though they never even heard the sermon.  From Monday through Saturday, they will act any ol' way they want and it doesn't matter how they treat folks the rest of the week.  No, God wants each one of us to take what we hear at church on Sundays . . . . or Saturdays . . . or whenever we go to church . . . and He wants us to take what we learn and use it the rest of the week.  He wants us to take what we learn at church and put it into practice the rest of the week.  God wants us to have a constant relationship with Him, not just on Sundays.  Some people like to keep God in their pocket and take Him out on Sundays when they go to church or at extreme times when they need Him.  A personal relationship with God is something that happens seven days a week and twenty-four hours a day.  You are a Christian every single day and not just on Sundays, the Lord would say to us.  Our Lord wants us to worship Him.  And we OUGHT to worship Him.  But He would also prefer that we show mercy to those who need mercy.  And when we show mercy, we are acting as the agent of God.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, September 21, 2014, at 9:30 AM as we worship Our Blessed Saviour.  Come join us as we not only gather together as God's family to show Our God the Worship that He is deserving of.  We also listen to God's Word, found both in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We listen to what God has to say to each one of us.  And we also receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

St. Margaret worships at the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please Note that the main drive leading into Marquette Manor is under construction but we can still enter into Marquette Manor through the "North Drive" and then just wind our way around to the front of the building.



Father Todd's Latest Sermon

To hear Fr. Todd's latest sermon from the Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, September 14th, 2014, please visit the following link:

http://fathertoddbragg.blogspot.com/2014/09/thirteenth-sunday-after-trinity-2014.html



Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 14th, 2014

Have you ever had the experience to look for something and you look and look and look and you can not find the object anywhere?  And then you go and look some more and you still can not find it.  And then at some point you find the item and it was exactly where you were looking the whole time.  You looked right at it but did not see it.  I am sure that each of us have had that experience at one point or another.  In the Tenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour giving instructions to the disciples:  " BLESSED are the eyes which see the things that ye see. . . ."  (St. Luke 10:23).  Our Lord is reminding the disciples that they are indeed blessed to see the things that they are seeing.  And certainly this is the case.  In other words, Our Lord was making the point further on that  " . . .  many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not see them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them." (St. Luke 10:24).  While this is certainly the truth . . . . i.e., that the disciples and the Apostles had the distinct honour of being in the presence of the Messiah of the world . . . . the point remains the same that the disciples still had to make the effort to look for and make the point to see the Messiah.  In other words, they could have moved on with their lives and never even made the point to notice the miracles that Our Lord performed . . . or they could have certainly not have cared enough to stop and to listen to the words that Our Lord was speaking.  The point that I am making is that while they were certainly blessed to see what they saw and hear what they heard, they still had to make the effort to stop long enough to see with their own eyes and to hear what was being said to them by the Messiah.

How many times has the Lord made the point to show Himself to us but, unfortunately, we were too busy to notice?  How many times throughout our life did God try to speak to us and we never heard what He had to say because we were too busy listening to everybody and everything else?  Sometimes the miracles are right in front of our eyes but we never take notice because we are too busy to look.  Sometimes the answer is being given to us but we never hear it because we are focused on other things.  Just like Our Lord showed Himself to the disciples and the Apostles, He also shows Himself to us.  Now, it may be true that we may have to pay closer attention and alter our way of looking for Him, make no doubt about it:  God is still making a point to show Himself to us . .  . He is still making a point to speak to us.  We just need to pay attention and know where to look.  " . . .  Blessed are the eyes that see the things that YOU see . . . .."

Please make a point to join us for Mass on Sunday morning, September 14th, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated in the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we hear the Word of God and listen to what God is saying to each one of us.  Join with us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour as God's family and then receive His Most Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.


Fr. Todd's Latest Sermon from the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity

Please feel free to listen to Fr. Todd's latest sermon from the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity given on Sunday, September, September 7th, 2014:

http://fathertoddbragg.blogspot.com/2014/09/twelfth-sunday-after-trinity-2014.html



Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 7th, 2014

In the Third Chapter of the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, we hear the following:  ". . . not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think any thing as of ourselves; but our sufficiency is of God." (2 Corinthians 3:4)  St. Paul is emphasizing the point to the church at Corinth that it is only through God, that we have sufficiency to do anything.  You see, the church at Corinth had to be reminded that they should always acknowledge that any greatness they have comes not from themselves but from God.  If this was a problem two thousand years ago, it is certainly a problem today.  In other words, does greatness come from man or does greatness come from God?  In today's society, where our technology is so wonderful, it lulls us into a sense that we can do anything.  With our computers, with our tablets, with our smart phones, we can surf the web and look up movie times, and find out information, we can make reports, and take videos and pictures of ourselves for the whole world to see.  We can live in fancy houses and eat at fancy restaurants and live in wonderful neighborhoods.  We can push ourselves to the limit, whether it be at our jobs, or in the gym, or working on home projects where we live.  We are capable of truly doing magnificent things.  And, yet, if we do not have God in our lives, we are fooled into thinking that we are the reason for this greatness.  If we have gotten into the habit of not going to church, not reading the Word of God, and not praying,  God becomes absent from our lives.  So, looking at it in that context, it is easily understandable why people are so "full of themselves" and take the credit for all of their success.

" . . . . but our sufficiency is of God . . . "  Yes, humanity has done many wonderful things and is capable of doing many wonderful things.  But any greatness that we possess was endowed to us by our Creator.  Any success that we have was bestowed upon us by God.  Any knowledge that we have to solve the problems of the world were given to us by Our Heavenly Father.  And this is why we should continually thank God for all the blessings that He has bestowed on us.  You know, as parents, we try to teach our children to say "Thank you" each time that they are given something.  "Remember to say 'Thank You'."  "Say 'Thank You.'"  And we hope that this simple act of courtesy will be instilled in them so that they will not only be courteous but will also allow them to be grateful for what they have been given.  Well, I don't know about you, but in the society that we live in today, very often I find people that do not say "Thank You," . . .  or "Please," for that matter.  And what is our response to those types of people?  More than likely, irritation that someone can be so rude as to not show common courtesy to say a simple "Thank You" when given something.  I tell you it's the same exact way when we don't say "Thank You" to God for the blessings that He has bestowed on us.  When we experience something good, we should get in the habit of thanking God.  When we are given something worthwhile, we should get in the habit to thank God.  If we do not regularly thank God for the blessings He has bestowed on us, we are exactly like that rude person we meet that does not show common courtesy or human decency when we do something for them.

Let us always acknowledge that "our sufficiency is of God" and to always make a point to acknowledge the blessings and to always be courteous to Our Heavenly Father and always show our thanks and gratitude.

Please join us on Sunday morning, September 7th, 2014, at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Anglican Church.  We worship in the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us for Mass as we use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  Join together with us as we listen to the Word of God and hear what God is saying to us.  Take an hour out of your busy schedule and devote it specifically to God!  Give that hour to God and see what God will give you in return!  He will give Himself to you at Communion time with His Precious Body and Blood!  Come join us so that we can give the honour and praise to Our Heavenly Father!

For more information about St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church, please visit our website:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Fr. Todd issues the "Holy Water Challenge"

Father Todd Bragg issued his "Holy Water Challenge" by challenging people to invite their friends, neighbors, family members, coworkers and even complete strangers to come to church!  Or, as Fr. Todd would like for it to be known, the "Plant a Seed" challenge!  Invite someone to come to church and plant the seed and leave the rest up to God!  

When you take the "Holy Water" or "Plant a Seed" Challenge, you really benefit three people:

1) You benefit God by bringing more people to church to give Him honour and praise and invite more people to join the family of God to worship Him!

2) You benefit the person you invited to church by allowing them to hear the Word of God and allowing them to worship God in a very special way:  with their brothers and sisters in Christ!

3) Finally, you benefit yourself by bringing someone to church and by doing your part to preach the Gospel and let someone else know about God!

Take the "Holy Water Challenge" and invite someone to church:





Eleventh Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 31st, 2014

In the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians, St. Paul is attempting to address a problem that is facing the church at Corinth:  namely, that some of the members do not believe in the resurrection. He writes in verse 12:  "Now if Christ be preached that He rose from the dead, how say say some among you that there is no resurrection from the dead?"   As a result, St. Paul is forced to confront this issue directly and this is the main purpose of this chapter.  He begins this chapter by talking about what was passed on to him:  "BRETHREN, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand; by which also ye are saved."  St. Paul is merely making the point that he is preaching what he received . .  . he is passing along what was first given to him . . .   he is sharing the knowledge that was shared with him.  Friends, we have to believe in the Resurrection of Our Blessed Saviour because this is our share in eternity.  Christ died on the Cross to save us from our sins but He also raised from the dead on the third day so that we can share eternal life with Him!   If there are some that did not acknowledge the Resurrection back in Corinth . . . and if there be any people today that doubt the historical fact of the Resurrection .. . . .  these people make God a liar.  "He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself: he that believeth not God hath made Him a liar; because he believeth not the record that God gave of His Son." (I St. John 5:10).  The Resurrection is our hope in this dreary world.  The Resurrection is the "signpost"  that we look forward to and follow.  If we do not look forward to our resurrection, then what is the purpose of this life?  So many people have the false belief that you live this life and then you die.  Period.  That's it.  End of story.  That is a very sad belief.  Time and time again, we have seen examples of those who have been given the riches of the world, and it ultimately meant nothing.  These poor souls were just as unhappy with their riches, if not even more unhappy.

St. Augustine of Hippo, whose feast-day we celebrated this week, discovered this fact.  He was only happy for so long with the pleasures of the world.  Each of the pleasures that he discovered did bring him happiness and comfort for a short time but he discovered that all of them eventually failed him in regards to bringing him lasting joy.  In other words, the joy they brought him only lasted a short time.  It was not until he discovered God that he realized that God is the ultimate joy.  God brings the ultimate happiness.  Whereas other pleasures of the world disappear after a while, the joy we find in God will never fail us.  We can say the same thing in regards to the "Resurrection."  If we give our hearts and our souls over to God, and do our best to live faithfully every day, we, too, will one day experience our resurrection and we will spend eternity in the Presence of Our Blessed Saviour.  He has promised us and has shown us by His example.

Come join us on Sunday, August 31st, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we gather together for Mass.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we listen to God's Word, listen to God speaking to us, worship God in traditional worship, and receive His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.



Feast of Saint Bartholomew the Apostle, Sunday, August 24th, 2014

On August 24th, the Church celebrates the Feast of Saint Bartholomew the Apostle, which this year falls on a Sunday.   Not very much is know about St. Bartholomew, particularly if you look in the New Testament.  The only time he is mentioned in Scripture is when he mentioned by name in a list of the Apostles.  Some scholars believe that St Bartholomew is simply another name for Nathaniel.   Tradition also says that St. Bartholomew might have preached in India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, or other lands.  So, as you can see, very little is actually known about St. Bartholomew.  There is more speculation than there is actual fact.

When you consider the subject matter of today's Gospel passage coming from St. Luke, this might prove to be a good thing in the case of St. Bartholomew.  Let me explain.  In today's Gospel, Our Lord is speaking to the Apostles in response to their arguing about who is the greatest, who has the most authority, who is the leader, etc.:  "AND there was also a strife among them, which of them should be accounted the greatest." (St. Luke 22:24)  And Our Blessed Saviour goes on to explain to them that whoever wants to be the greatest needs to be the least.  Whosoever wants to be the leader needs to be the one who serves.  The elder needs to be as the younger, Our Lord states.  Certainly, St. John the Baptist stated this belief perfectly when he said:  "He must increase, but I must decrease."  (St. John 3:30)   Seen in the light of what Our Lord told the Apostles, the fact that little is known about St. Bartholomew shows that he took Our Lord's words to the heart.  In other words, St. Bartholomew was more interested in making Our Lord's Name known than he was in making his own name known.  This is how it should be for all Christians, not just the Apostles.  We should be more interested in making Our Lord's Name be known than making our own name known.  If we look at the lives of the Apostles and the disciples and the lives of the saints, we see that they have dedicated their lives to God.  They were more interested in making God's name be known.  Their glory was in glorifying God and making Him known.  In this, we should follow the advice of St. John the Baptist and St. Bartholomew:  "God must increase . . .  and we must decrease . . . "

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Come join us as we gather as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour.  Come join us as we listen to the Word of God and hear what He has to say to each one of us.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ.




St. Mary the Virgin (Feast of the Assumption) Transferred, Sunday, August 17th, 2014

From the opening collect from the feast of St. Mary the Virgin, we hear the following:  "O GOD, who hast taken to thyself the blessed Virgin Mary, mother of thine only Son. .  ."  I do not doubt in the least that God took Our Lady to Himself, just as He will take all of His faithful children to Himself.  "For Thou, O God hast heard my vows:  Thou hast given me the heritage of those that fear Thy Name." (Psalm 61:5) And also we hear:  "Teach me Thy way, O Lord; I will walk in Thy truth; unite my heart to fear Thy Name." (Psalm 86:11)  Certainly, Our Blessed Lady walked in the way of God and, as such, she is an example to all of the Church.  The Church teaches that Our Lady was assumed into Heaven as a reward for her faithfulness to God.  And yet each one of us can be spiritually assumed as well, so to speak, each time we place ourselves in the Presence of Our Heavenly Father.  Each one of us is called to be faithful to God.  As Christians, our focus should always be on God.

In the example of Our Blessed Lady, this is certainly the case.  She dedicated her life to God and said "Yes" to God.  In so doing, God used her as the vehicle, if you will, for Salvation to enter the world.  She became that vehicle where her Son was born as the long awaited Messiah to enter the world.  God used Our Lady as that instrument so that His Son could be born as a human being.  Our prayer should be that God will also use us as His instrument in the world.

While it is true that we will not give birth to the Messiah in the same way as St. Mary, I would ask you to seriously consider the fact that when you do the will of the Father, you are His instrument in the world.  When you say "yes" to God, as did Our Blessed Lady, you help to bring Christ into the world.  When you do the will of the Father, you become the vehicle in bringing Christ into the world once again.  Each and every time we honour God by saying "yes" to Him and doing what He would have us do, we do our part to help bring about the Kingdom of God.  Our Lady did not fully understand why God chose her to do His will  . . . .  but she obeyed, nonetheless.  We may not always fully understand why God chose us to do His will but as long as we say "yes," we will be in good company.  All the saints in Heaven all said "yes" to God.  None of them were worthy in terms of perfection.  All had their faults . . . all had their shortcomings . . .  all were lacking.  But it is God that makes the difference.  It is God that makes up for any lack or shortcoming.  It is God that fulfills what is lacking.  It is God that makes possible the "impossible."   So, let us follow in the footsteps of Our Blessed Lady and all the saints in Heaven.  Let each one of us say "yes" to God and place all of our focus in doing His will in our lives.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.
Join us for Mass as we gather to hear God's word.  Join us as we gather as God's family to worship Him.  Join with your brothers and sisters as we all take one hour out of our busy schedules and dedicate that hour to the worship of Our Blessed Saviour!  And then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ, the Good Shepherd Who laid down His life for His sheep!




Bishop Strawn's Visit to St. Margaret on August 10th, 2014

Bishop Strawn made his annual visit to St. Margaret on Sunday, August 10th, 2014.  We are very grateful for the time and the effort which Bishop Strawn made to drive from Quincy, Illinois to Indianapolis.  It was a busy weekend for Bishop Strawn as he also visited Holy Spirit on Saturday evening.

To find out more about this visit and to see pictures, please visit the following link:

http://fathertoddbragg.blogspot.com/2014/08/bishop-strawns-visitation-from-august.html


Eighth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 10th, 2014

In the seventh chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour describing how we shall identify corrupt pastors and shepherds.  You shall know them by their actions, by what they do, by what they say, etc.  In short, you will be able to identify them by what they do.  "A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit." (St. Matthew Chapter 7)  I would say that this is true about Christians, in general, not just in describing good or bad shepherds.  All of us who are serious about our Christianity . . .  . and if you are taking the time to read this right now, I would say that you are certainly making the effort to be a Christian, or else why would you be wasting your time here? . . . . anyway, if we are serious about being a true Christian, we will make the effort to do the right thing.

When you are a true Christian, the bottom line is that you will be held to a higher standard by those around you:  your friends, your coworkers, and, yes, even your family.  When you make a point to be a true, serious, dedicated Christian, you will be held accountable for every single thing that you do.  People will hold YOU accountable for things that they don't hold themselves accountable for.  Why?  Because they know that it is YOU that is trying to be a true Christian. This is unfair sometimes, we know, because none of us are perfect and even dedicated, committed Christians will make mistakes every now and then.  We are human, after all, and humans do make mistakes.  But the point is still the same.  We will be known by the fruit that we bring forth:   . . . . A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit . . . .

If we say we are a Christian and then we go out and go raging drunk every other night . . . . are we truly a Christian?   If we say that we are a Christian but we cheat our customers so that we can take their money . . .  are we truly a Christian?  If we go to church on Sunday morning and by the time we get to the parking lot, we are already bad-mouthing and gossiping about someone we were just at church with . . . are we truly a Christian?  Now, this list could go on and on.  We can all think of examples, but I am sure that you know exactly what I am speaking of.  We all can think of people that we have known if life that have stated that they are Christians . . . they believe that they are Christians . . . but they certainly do not act like Christians.  It's one thing to "act" holy and pious when you are in church, it's completely different how you act and what you do when you are outside of church.  A true Christian gives his / her heart over to the Lord.  A true Christian dedicates his / her life to the Lord.  A true Christian makes a firm commitment to follow Our Lord and bases their decisions on that commitment, whether they be small or large.  And once we dedicate ourselves to God and follow through from there, we will soon see the fruits of that commitment.  And those around us will see the fruits of that commitment, as well.

Please join us on Sunday, August 10th at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Sunday, August 10th will be a special day for our church because we welcome His Grace, the Rt. Rev'd Stephen Strawn, the bishop of the Diocese of the Missouri Valley.  Bishop Strawn will celebrate Mass and also preach.  So please come out and join us.  Be with us as we listen to the Word of God.  Join us as we listen to God speaking to us.  Come worship Our Heavenly Father with us.  And, finally, receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.  A reception for Bishop Strawn will be held after Mass where you can enjoy all kinds of delicious goodies and be able to meet and speak with Bishop Strawn.



Please Join Us on Sunday, August 10th, 2014

His Grace, the Rt Rev'd Stephen Strawn will be making his annual visit to St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church (Indianapolis, IN) on Sunday, August 10th, 2014.  Please join us for Mass on this day.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Bishop Strawn will be celebrating Mass and preaching that day.  After Mass is over, we will have a special celebration in honour of Bishop Strawn with lots of delicious goodies.  Please make a point to join us on this day so that we can make Bishop Strawn feel welcome.  It's been two years since Bishop Strawn has been with us since it was Bishop Williams and Mrs. Williams who visited us last year.  So, this is Bishop Strawn's first visit with us since 2012.  

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Marquette Manor is located directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  St. Margaret of Scotland Church is a member parish of the Diocese of the Missouri Valley, Anglican Church of America.  We welcome  you to join with us in welcoming Bishop Strawn to our parish.  Please make a point to be with us so that we can make the bishop feel welcome that day.




Upcoming Event:  
Visitation of Bishop and Mrs. Strawn to St. Margaret
Sunday, August 10th, 2014

Please mark your calendar for Sunday, August 10th, 2014 as The Rt. Rev'd Stephen and Mrs. Annette Strawn will visit our parish.  It will be especially nice since we have not seen them for two years since their last visit in 2012.  So please join us as the bishop makes his annual visit to St. Margaret of Scotland parish.  His Grace, Bishop Strawn, will not only say the Mass that day, he will also preach.  And after Mass, we will get the opportunity to each greet and spend time with Bishop and Mrs. Strawn as they travel to Indianapolis from Quincy, IL.  Now, I have made that trip a few times back and forth from Indianapolis to Quincy so I know first hand how long of a trip it is to travel to Indianapolis.  Please mark your calendars for Sunday, August 10th, 2014 at 9:30 AM so that we can welcome Bishop and Mrs. Strawn.



Seventh Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

There seems to be a lot of talk about wages and salary, if you only pay attention.  Here, lately, there has been talk of fast food workers walking out or staging demonstrations because they want to be paid fifteen dollars per hour, for example.  Everyone wants to be paid a fair wage.  In the sixth chapter of the Letter to the Romans, we hear the following:  "For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord."  If we offer services, we have to make sure we are paid fairly for the services we render.  If not, we would consider ourselves to be "cheated."  But not everything gets "paid" by actual monetary exchange.  In certain things we are paid in other ways.  For example, if we sow discord and we get our friends or loved ones all riled up in a fight, then we will be repaid through disharmony or unhappiness in the home.  If we cheat a friend or lie to a friend, we will repaid through distrust after that.  That old saying springs to mind "You get what you deserve" is usually pretty accurate.  In essence, this is what we heard this morning in Acts:  " . . . the wages of sin is death . . . "  The bottom line is this, when we sin, we turn our back on God.  When we sin, we do things that are contrary to what He would do or what He would want us to do.  We choose to do the opposite of what God would have us do when we sin.  That is the definition of sin, in a nutshell.  And if we choose to live our lives in a lifestyle at odds with God, or contrary to what God would have us do, we will paid with appropriate wages:  death.

But on the other hand, Our Lord offers us the gift of eternal life if we only give our lives over to God and make Jesus Christ the Lord and Saviour of our life.  You see, once we give our life to the Lord, we become a new creature, as St. Paul puts it, and we will live for doing what is right in God's eyes.  Sure, being a Christian does not mean that we are perfect but what it does mean is that when we do fall, when we do something that we know God does not want us to do, a Christian will recognize that fact and will ask for forgiveness and then move forward, finding ways to not commit that particular sin again.  Have you ever had your car stuck in the mud?  You keep trying and trying and trying to get out but it doesn't work.  You are just stuck there.  It is not until you try something different, for example, by turning the wheel, or placing a board underneath the tire, until you are able to finally free your car from the mud.  This is what it's like to be "stuck in sin."  We keep doing the same thing over and over and over and over again.  And we experience the same end result over and over and over and over and over again.  We are stuck just like that car in the mud.  The wage of that lifestyle leads to death.  But as Christians we have the opportunity to changes our lives around, we have the opportunity to have a relationship with the Messiah, the Saviour of the world, the Lord and Master.  And when we do, not only will our lives get "un-stuck" but we will be blessed one day with eternal life.  Everyone wants to be paid fairly.   Will we be paid in death or in eternal life?

Please join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, August 3rd, 2014 at 9:30 AM.  We worship in the beautiful chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we worship Our Lord using the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.



Sixth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 27th, 2014

There is a fine line that Christians have to walk, let's face it. On the one hand, Christians seem to have gotten a "bum rap" due to some Christians thinking that they are better than other people.  On the other hand we hear Our Divine Saviour tell the disciples:  " Except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees. . ."  (St. Matthew 5:20)  So, at least in the case of "righteousness," we are called to exceed, to do better, to be better at, etc.  But, of course, the context means everything.   What words come to mind when we think of the word "righteousness?  Sanctification; Truth; Godliness; Good Works; Holiness, etc.  We are called to perfect righteousness in our lives by coming closer to God and letting these aspects of righteousness direct our daily actions and everything we do.  In this way, we show the "Face of God" to those around us by what they see us do on a daily basis.  "The way of the wicked is an abomination unto the Lord: but He loveth him that followeth after righteousness." (Proverbs 15:9)  On the other hand, we can not be so proud of our righteousness, we can not be so focused on the fact that we are in a "right relationship" with God that we use it as excuse to look down on others who do not seem . . . or at least in our own minds . . . do not seem to be in a good relationship with God.  You see, I think here is the difference:  we need to work on a daily basis, our entire lives, on perfecting our righteousness but we are not called to use that as excuse to look down our noses at those whom we judge as somehow "less righteous" than we are.  When Our Lord stated that we are called to have more righteousness than the scribes and the Pharisee's, He was simply making the point that their righteousness was based on what they did externally by their actions.  The problem was that their external actions did not match up with what they felt or thought internally in regards to love and forgiveness.  Our righteousness has to "match up" both internally and externally is the bottom line.  And this type of "perfection"  . . .  for most of us, anyway . . . .  takes a lifetime to achieve.

Please make a point to join us for Mass on Sunday, July 27th, 2014 at 9:30 AM.

During Mass you will join with brothers and sisters who simply want to join together to worship Our Blessed Saviour; hear His Word; be inspired to find ways to grow closer to God, and then, finally, receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, just South of 86th Street on Township Line Road.  Marquette Manor is directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.



Fifth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 20th, 2014

" . . .nevertheless at thy word . .  ." (St. Luke 5)  Here, lately, we have been talking a lot, it seems about humility.  It is hard for us human beings to be humble for a number of reasons:  we want things done our way; we think that we are always the authority; it's difficult to admit that we are wrong; etc.  But St. Peter teaches us a very important lesson in the Fifth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel.  Now, when Our Lord directed St. Peter to cast the nets out to catch some fish, St. Peter let Him know that they had already done that all night and basically brought home nothing!  Our Lord directed him to do it and St. Peter responded,  . . .  nevertheless at thy word . . ."  In our Christian faith, we may not necessary want to do certain things but we go ahead and do them anyway because God calls us to do those things.  That's faith.  We may not understand how things are going to happen or how actions are going to take place but due to God's direction, we do those things anyway.  That's faith.   St. Peter was the fisherman.  He did that for a living.  So as a professional, I am sure that he knew what he was doing when it came to fishing.  But when it seemed foolish and beyond his comprehension to throw the nets in one more time, at the Lord's direction, he responded:  "nevertheless at thy word"  That's faith.  

The same is true for Our Blessed Mother.  She did not understand what was being said to her when she was being told that she would become the mother to the Messiah.  It was beyond her understanding and beyond her comprehension.  But despite this fact, what was her response?  "Let it be done to me according to thy word . . . ."  That's faith!  We will not always understand the will of God .. . . it may beyond our comprehension.  We may not always want to do the will of God . . . . what God is calling us to do may be difficult, like forgiving people who have done us great harm.  But to do what God wants us to do even when we don't understand and when we don't want to do it . . . .. that's faith!  God calls us to follow Him.  He doesn't call us to necessarily understand.  He calls us to do His will in this life.  When we do, we are acting in great faith!

Please join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, July 20th, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Heavenly Father.  We meet at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  We use the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We listen to the Word of God speaking to each one of us.  And we also receive the Precious Body and Blood at Communion time so that we can be nourished.




Fourth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 13th, 2014

In the Old Testament book of Ecclesiastes we hear:  "Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity." (Ecclesiastes 1:2)  This verse could certainly have been written about our society today.  In our epistle from today, the Letter to the Romans, we also hear:  "For the creature was made subject to vanity . . . "  (Romans 8:18 ff)  Of course, we all want to look our best.  We all have concerns about things that concern us.  We are interested in the things that affect us.  This is certainly understandable to a degree because we can only see things through our eyes and experience things from our perspective.  But there is a difference between being concerned with ourselves and being fixated on ourselves.  Our society seems to have the "fixation on self" syndrome.  But, as Christians, we are called to look beyond ourselves and look toward the One Who is worthy of our fixation, of our admiration, of our love.  " . . .  vanity of vanities . . .  all is vanity . . . "  Fixation on the things of this world:  whether they be on fashion, or styles, or social media, or the latest trends, or even our appearance, all is passing and is subject to change.     St. Peter reminds us:  "Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, . . . . But with the precious Blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot . . . ." (I St. Peter 1:18-19)  It is nice to look our best.  It is often nice to be up on the latest fashion trend.  It is good to have nice possessions . .  . after all, we worked hard to obtain them . . . . but we should not put our trust in any of these things because they will not redeem us.  None of these items or trends or fads, that are here today and gone tomorrow, none of them have the power to save us, no matter how wonderful they are.  Only the Precious Body and the Precious Blood of Our Blessed Saviour can save us.  It is Him that we are called to place our trust and our confidence . . . anything else is just vanity.

Please join us on Sunday, July 13th, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass for the Fourth Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join with us as we listen to the Word of God found not only in the King James Version of the Bible but also from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as God speaks directly to each one of us.  Take just one hour out of your busy schedules so that you can worship Our Blessed Saviour and dedicate that time to the One Who gives you so much.  And, finally, join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood in Holy Communion.

You can find out more about our parish by visiting our website:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Third Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 6th, 2014

From the First Epistle of St. Peter we hear:  ". . . for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble." (I St. Peter 5:5 ff)  St. Peter more than likely is quoting Scripture here because we also find in Proverbs 3:34:  "Surely He scorneth the scorners: but He giveth grace unto the lowly."   . .. . giveth grace to he humble . . . giveth grace to the lowly . .  .   Not only did St. Peter learn this truth from Holy Scripture but he learned it even more importantly in witnessing countless souls approaching humbly to Our Blessed Saviour.  Of course, Our Blessed Lord came to be with the humble of the world:  the poor and needy;  the sick; the sinners.  This is the reason He came:  to redeem those in need of redemption.  But before we can obtain redemption, we have to acknowledge our need of redemption.  In other words, we have to admit in our hearts, in our souls, in our minds, that we have sinned and are in need of forgiveness.  In a similar sense, it is much like acknowledging that we are sick and going to the doctor in search of healing.  We first recognize the fact that we are sick; next, we realize that we can not get well on our own; finally, we go to the doctor seeking medical treatment.  The same is true, spiritually speaking:  we first recognize the fact that we are sinners; we realize that we can not find peace and healing in ourself; we finally humble ourself and ask for God's forgiveness and ask Him to come into our heart.  "When Jesus heard it, He saith unto them, They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance."  (St. Mark 2:17)  Let us pray for humility enough to recognize that we are in need of God in our life and then give our hearts over to Him.

Join us as we gather together as God's family to:  hear the Word of God; listen as God speaks to each one of us in our hearts; worship God in song and in word; listen to the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer; and, finally, receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion so that we can be nourished for the journey we call life.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule to worship God, to honour God, to acknowledge the need for God in your life.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

You can find out more about our parish by visiting:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Second Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 29, 2014

In the Epistle from today's Mass, we hear the following:  "MARVEL not, my brethren, if the world hate you. We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren" (I Epistle of St. John 3:13 ff)  As St. John reminds us, we should not be amazed if the world hates us . .  . . that same world hated Our Blessed Saviour.  Thus, if the world showed scorn and contempt for Christ, we should not expect any different treatment for ourselves.   We know that Our Blessed Saviour came to the world to show God's love.  He came to bring redemption, to bring salvation.  He came to preach love and to show love.  And what did He get in return?  He received scorn and contempt and hatred.  He was the recipient of hatred and anger from those who wanted nothing to do with Him.  But despite all of this, Our Blessed Lord remained committed to His values and His beliefs.  He remained steadfast and firmly rooted in love even when confronted with hatred and anger from the world.

This is exactly what sets committed, dedicated Christians apart from the world.  "By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another." (St. John 13:35)  Even when confronted with the opposition and hatred of the world, we need to remain steadfast in our commitment to love just like Our Blessed Lord.  St. John tells us:  "We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren." (I Epistle of St. John 3:14)  When Zacharias (the father of St. John the Baptist) prophesied, as recorded in the first chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear:  "To give light to them that sit in darkness and and in the shadow of death . . . ." (St. John 1:79)  The "light" that we show to the world is the love we show.  The light that we give to those who sit in darkness around us is the love that we show them.  As Christians, we are called to remain steadfast in love and committed to show love.

We remain committed to our beliefs, respond in love to those who are against us, and show love to those that hate us.   In this way, we imitate Our Blessed Saviour and the way He treated people . . . even those who hated Him.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Bible.  Join us as we take time out of our busy schedules and take just one simple hour to dedicate it to God so that we can use this time to honour and worship the same God Who has given so much to us.  Join us as we receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion.  And, finally, join your brothers and sisters in Christ to worship Our Heavenly Father.



Simple, Effective Ways to Support Your Parish

Did you know there are many ways that you can support your parish and each of these ways is very simple, yet very effictive!. 

The first and primary way to support your parish is through YOUR attendance! You show that you support your parish through your attendance at weekly Masses, meetings, and special activities that your church hosts. YOUR church can not exist without YOU!

The next way to support your parish is to invite someone to attend church with you. You can invite anyone you can think of: relatives; friends; neighbors; coworkers; even complete strangers! Anyone you can think of that would benefit from going to church, invite them to church with you! You will bless them and bless your church through this simple act of kindness!

A third way to support your parish is so simple you don't even have to leave the comfort of your chair!  If you have access to a computer, let people know about your parish via email or social media such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc.   Forward the FB posts and let your friends know about your church and their special activities. Forward your parish website address and let your friends know about your church. Who knows? A seed may be planted simply by forwarding on an email or an announcement via FB!

And, finally, PRAY, PRAY, PRAY for your parish! Pray that God will bless our parish and guide us so that we can do His will!


Solemnity of Corpus Christi (Transferred), Sunday, June 22, 2014

On Sunday, June 22nd, 2014, we will celebrate the Solemnity of the Feast of Corpus Christi . . . . the Body and Blood of Christ.  In the First Letter to the Corinthians we hear the following:  "   . .  . This is My body, which is broken for you. . . " (I Corinthians 11:23 ff)  When we look at the various sections of Holy Scripture where Our Blessed Lord refers to His Body and Blood, He makes it perfectly clear in regards to the meaning:  "This is My Body . . . . This is My Blood."  As Anglicans in the Catholic Tradition, we have a special love and devotion for the Precious Body and Precious Blood of Our Blessed Saviour.  The fact that we gather together each and every week around the altar so that we can receive Him is testament to this fact.  Yes, absolutely, we come to hear God's Word.  Yes, without a doubt, we come to hear God speaking to us.  But, when we gather together to receive the Precious Body and the Precious Blood, we know that Our Blessed Lord is nourishing us, sustaining us, giving us strength to carry on.

One of my favorite Scripture passages comes from the 19th Chapter of the First Book of Kings where we find the Prophet Elijah on a journey into the wilderness and the angel comes to him.  "And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, then an angel touched him, and said unto him, Arise and eat." (I Kings 19:5)  "And the angel of the Lord came again the second time, and touched him, and said, Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee." (I Kings 19:7)    . . . . Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee . . . .  The journey that we call life is too great for us at times.  Thus, we have to be reminded to  nourish ourselves from the One Who can truly nourish . . .  Our Blessed Saviour.  "Come unto Me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." (St. Matthew 11:28)  Only He can truly satisfy us . . . only He can truly strengthen us . . .  only He can truly nourish us for the journey.  "Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee . . . "

Join us for Mass as we celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi.  Mass is celebrated at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us as we gather together to hear God's Word spoken in a powerful way as God speaks to each one of us.  And then receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion.

If you would like to find out more information about our parish, please go to:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Latest Sermon Loaded from Fr. Todd Bragg

Forgive the short delay but between the Synod and app problems with sharing the audio portions of my sermon, I am just now getting around to being caught up in loading my sermons online.  I apologize but the main culprit for not being caught up in posting my sermons online has been "app error" and "user error" in not knowing (apparently) how to get the app to work correctly!  The app that I was using previously recorded my sermons marvelously but that was not the problem.  The problem was that once the sermon was recorded, I could not use the app to load the recorded sermon to Youtube.  Oh, it would tell me that it was uploaded to Youtube but that was never the case.

So it took me a while to find another app that I could use not only to record my sermons but to ALSO upload my sermons!  Well, I have found another app that seems to be working for the time being, so I have been able to load the sermon from "Whitsunday" this evening.  I am hoping to load the sermon from "Trinity Sunday" tomorrow.

If you would like to hear Fr. Todd's latest sermon from Whitsunday, please feel free to visit the following link And, as always, thanks for your support!:

http://fathertoddbragg.blogspot.com/2014/06/whitsunday-2014.html




Trinity Sunday, June 15th, 2014

Beginning in the third chapter of St. John's Gospel, we are listening to a conversation between Our Blessed Saviour and Nicodemus and Our Lord tells Nicodemus that we must be "born again."  This phrase confuses Nicodemus a little because he comes right out and asks:  "How can a man be born again?  Can he enter his mother's womb a second time?"  And Our Lord explains to him how this is possible by stating:  "That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.." (St. John 3:1 ff)  As Our Lord explains to Nicodemus, our physical body can only be born once but in the spirit, we can indeed be born again.  It would be physically and virtually impossible for a human being to be born again, but purely in the spiritual sense, it is possible to begin all over again by turning our lives over to God.  This is because Our Lord makes the point to distinguish between what is physical and what is spiritual.  Thus, in our spirit when we give our hearts over to God and make Him the master of our life, then we become born again.  We become, as St. Paul puts it,  "a new creature."  "Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new."  (II Corinthians 5:17)  Our Lord says to Nicodemus that "That whosoever believeth in (the Son of Man, Jesus) should not perish, but have eternal life."   (St. John 3:15)  So believe in Our Lord and put all your trust in Him.  Make Him the ruler and the very center of your life and turn your hearts over to Him!

Today, we celebrate "Trinity Sunday" where we celebrate the Holy Trinity:  Father, Son and Holy Ghost.  The concept of the Holy Trinity is a difficult concept for most of us to comprehend.  In other words, how can three distinct persons be in one person?  "For there are three that bear record in Heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these Three are One." (I St. John 5:7)  Theologians have been trying to explain this concept for countless generations.  But for us, we need to focus on the fact that we know by faith that there is but One God, comprised of Three Persons:  the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.  Each one of these Persons has a distinct job or role to play.  But beyond that, we know that are the image of God here in this world.  How can we be the "image" of God if God is not physical and does not have physical characteristics?  "For God, Who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts .  . . . ." (II Corinthians 4:6)  We resemble God not in our outward characteristics but rather we resemble God inwardly:  in how we act; how we treat others; how we love; how we have compassion; in how we forgive; etc.  The image of God that we were created in is through the spirit that is within each one of us.  And it is up to us how much we let that light shine forth to the rest of the world.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships together each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Come worship with us as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come hear the Word of God preached in a powerful way so that you can hear how God is speaking to you.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule so that you can dedicate that hour to God in humble adoration.  And, finally, receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at Communion time so that He can nourish and sustain you for the journey of life.

For more information, please visit our website at:

http:indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Whitsunday, Sunday, June 8th, 2014

In today's Gospel from St. John, we hear the following:  " . . . . If a man love me, he will keep my words; and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him." (St. John 14:15 ff)  Today we celebrate the feast of Whitsunday, or Pentecost.  Although I am sure that it would not  be liturgically correct, but outside of that it would certainly be appropriate to sing "Happy Birthday" at today's Mass because this is considered to be the "birthday of the Church" when the Holy Ghost descended upon those assembled in that upper room:  "And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting." (Acts 2:1 ff)   Without a doubt, as we hear described here in the Second Chapter of the Acts of the Apostle, the whole house was filled, and the sound was like a great rushing, mighty wind.  But, again, it states that the "house was filled."  " . . . .  and it filled the house . . . ."  But they were filled also with the Holy Ghost because we hear in Verse 4:  "And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost . .  ." (Acts 2:4)

God has the ability to fill us up as well . . . but we have to allow Him.  God has the power to fill us with His Presence . . .  but we first have to be open.  God can come into our lives and empower us . . . but we have to be willing.   You see, God can do all things.  Obviously, we know this is true because He created the universe and everything in it.  But God will not come into our hearts without being invited first.  Just like the Apostles and the Blessed Mother, we need to be open to God coming into our hearts and our souls and our lives . . . . "And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost" . . .   We, too, just like them can be filled with the Holy Ghost but two things have to happen first:  1) We need to invite God into our hearts and be open to Him;  2) We need to empty our hearts to make room for the Holy Ghost to come in.  You see, if we need to move something into the closet, such as jackets or sweaters or clothes, for example, we first have to make room in the closet for the new items we are moving there.  In other words, if the closet is already packed full of other things, you can not very well move anything else in there.  Make room in the closet so that you will have room for the new items.  In a similar way, how can the Holy Ghost find a place in our heart if our heart is already packed full with love of things of this life; love of things of this world; love of self; etc.  Clear your heart first of these things and then there will be ample room for the Holy Ghost to have a place in your heart.

Join us for Mass on Whitsunday as we celebrate the birthday of the Church.  Come gather with us at Mass and ask the Holy Ghost to fill your heart:  to give you knowledge; to enlighten you; to empower you; to lead you closer to your Heavenly Father.   Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we sing, worship and honour God; as we hear the Word of God spoken to each one of us; and also receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ at communion time.

If you want to find out more about our parish, please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/





Fr. Todd's Sermons to be posted online

In an ongoing effort to reach out to more people, Fr. Todd is attempting to post an audio recording of his sermon each week on his personal blog.  Even if you are not able to make it to church on a given Sunday and hear the sermon for yourself, you can now hear the sermon online each week.  Please feel free to visit Fr. Todd's website to hear his weekly sermon.  You can hear his latest sermon from "Ascension Sunday" at the following link:

Fr. Todd's Sermon from Ascension Sunday




Ascension Sunday, Sunday, June 1st, 2014

In the beginning of the Acts of the Apostles, we hear at one point the disciples gathered together with Our Blessed Lord after His Resurrection and asked Him:  "Lord, wilt thou at this time restore again the kingdom to Israel?" (Acts 1:6)  Now, Our Lord responded : "It is not for you to know the times or the seasons, which the Father put in His own power." (Acts 1:7)  Now, it could be that the disciples were merely asking a question out of curiosity or perhaps they had other reasons for wanting to know.  Very often it seems that we put qualifications on doing things.  Sometimes it is necessary to know the "qualifications" of what we do.  For example, if we are having guests over at our house, we should know when they are arriving so that we will know when things need to be accomplished.  Another example would be to know when a report is due at work.  So, in examples such as those it is necessary to ask and to know qualifying questions.  But Our Lord expects us to act as Christians no matter what:  no matter the circumstances . . . . no matter the situation . . . . no matter the conditions of life in general . . . . we are called to be Christians. Period.  So often, it seems, that we need things to be "just right" before we can do something.  Now, again, this is understandable in some circumstances.  We have to have all the ingredients on hand before we make those delicious chocolate chip cookies or it really should not be blizzard-like conditions and twenty below zero if we expect to see our favorite baseball team play a double-header.  But we are expected to be, and act as a, Christian no matter the conditions.  Sometimes, even as Christians, we put qualifiers or conditions on things that we are called to do or we won't do them.  "Oh, I don't have time to read the Bible today .  .  .  . I'm too busy with other things."  "Oh, I could go visit my neighbors and see how they are doing but they are always complaining and always in a bad mood."  As Christians, we are called to be Christians no matter the season, no matter the time, no matter the circumstances.  We are called "Christians" because we are followers of Christ. Period.  Not just on Sundays . . .  not just when we are in church . . . . we are not Christians only when we feel like it, when it's convenient for us, when the time is right.  No, we are called to be and act as Christians all the time and under all circumstances.  This will not always be easy.  But it is well worth the effort.

Please visit St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, June 1st, 2014 as we celebrate Ascension Sunday.  We worship at the beautiful Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  Come out and join us as we take one hour from our busy schedule in life and dedicate it to Our Blessed Saviour.  We take one hour out of our busy schedule and use to listen to the Word of God and hear what He is saying to each one of us.  And then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Blessed Saviour at Communion time.

If you would like to find out more about our parish, please visit:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Fifth Sunday after Easter, Sunday, May 25th, 2014

St. James tells us:  ".BE ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves." (St. James 1:22)   For a Christian, this sounds like pretty good advice:  " . . . . be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only . . . ."  But this Epistle of St. James has caused some controversy over the years for some Christian thinkers such as Martin Luther, for example, because they contended that St. James was proposing that we can earn our way into Heaven by what we do.   Now, without a doubt, there have been various individuals who have tried to "buy their way" into Heaven but what we hear from this verse ".  . . . be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only . .  ."   This is just an example of good old  fashioned sense, if you ask me.  I say this because, sadly, each one of us can think of a person who was "nothing but mouth."  In other words, we each know someone who talked about being a Christian but did not live as a Christian.  There are a lot of people who could explain the Christian faith and they could go on and on and on about it, but the question is:  Can they live the Christian faith and not just talk about it?  "Be ye doers of the word . . . ."  I think his is probably one of the biggest reasons why Our Blessed Lord came to earth as a human being, so that we could see Him in action.  Sure, God could have just spoken to us about being a Christian and left it at that.  But Our Lord chose to become a human being so that He could live among us, work with us, eat with us, travel with us, converse with us . . .  etc.  And, conversely, we got to see Him as well:  how He treated people, how He reacted to people, how He cured people, how He loved people.  Our Lord was a wonderful teacher and taught the faith wonderfully . . . . but He backed up His teaching by the way in which He lived.  Each one of us must listen and hear and pay attention, that is for sure,  but once we have listened and heard and paid attention, this gets translated into how we treat people, " . . . .  be ye doers of the word  . . . . ."

Join us for Mass on Sunday, May 25th, 2014 as we gather together as God's family to hear the Word of God and to worship Our Blessed Lord.  St.Margaret of Scotland Church worships each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  For more information, please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Fourth Sunday after Easter, Sunday, May 18th, 2014

In the book of Numbers in the Old Testament, we hear the following:  "God is not a man, that he should lie . . . ."  (Numbers 23:19)  He can only tell the truth. God is faithful to the truth . . .  He is the Truth!   Obviously, Our Blessed Lord Himself stated "I am the way, the truth, and the life . . ." (St. John 14:6)  So when we read through Scripture, we can read about truths, and blessings and miracles and promises . . . . many more than we could list right here at the present time.  But we always have to keep in mind as Christians that God is not only faithful to the truth, He is also faithful to His promises.  God has made many promises to His people and He follows through with His promises.  One of the promises that Our Lord made was to send the Comforter to us to be with us:  " . . . . but if I depart, I will send Him unto you."  (St. John 14:7)  And elsewhere we read:  "But when the Comforter is come, Whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of Truth .. . . " (St. John 15:26)  The Lord has promised to send the Holy Ghost to us.  He has promised that the Holy Ghost will dwell with us and give us knowledge and give us truth and give us a conviction of the truth into our hearts.  The Holy Ghost is given to us as a Helper but we must make a point to listen to the Holy Ghost if we are to make the most of the gifts that He offers to us.  We need to pray for the coming of the Holy Ghost into our lives and, more importantly, that we will be obedient and listen to the Holy Ghost as He is speaking to us.  For many, sadly, the Holy Ghost does not empower us because we ourselves do not pay attention.  For many, the Holy Ghost does not give us knowledge because we ourselves do not listen.  For many, we do not gain truth from the Holy Ghost because we ourselves are too busy to listen or pay attention.  Similar to  the book on our bookshelf that is never opened and only gathers dust, so too, sadly, we never gain the benefits of the Comforter that Our Lord promised to us because we turn a blind eye.  Our Lord is faithful to His promises even if we are not.

Join us for Mass on Sunday, May 18th, 2014 as we celebrate the Fourth Sunday after Easter.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Join us as we hear the word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God speak to each one of us in a powerful way.  Join us as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Blessed Saviour, to give Him praise, to give Him our adoration, to worship Him.  And then receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

If you have any questions, please visit our parish website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Third Sunday after Easter, Sunday, May 11th, 2014

In the Sixteenth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, Our Lord is preparing the Apostles for His eventual death on the Cross:  "JESUS said to his disciples, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the Father."  (St. John 16:16)   Certainly, speaking these words to the Apostles caused them great confusion and misunderstanding.  Our Lord could see the confusion in their hearts and on their faces and He explained that their "sorrow shall be turned into joy." (v. 20)  He then goes on to use the example of a woman in labor:  "A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come: but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man be born into the world." (v. 21)    Our Lord makes a very important point to the Apostles that all of us should remember as well:  all that we experience here on earth is only temporary.   This is very difficult for us to comprehend because this human experience is all we have ever experienced and we know none other.  And yet God is outside of time.  So this human existence that we call "life" is only temporary . . . .  it is only a tiny "grain of sand" in comparison to eternity.  Our "sorrow will be turned into joy" when we leave this world and enter into the next.  Did you ever have the experience where you were preparing for something . . . perhaps, a dinner for some guests, or getting a report ready for work, or working on some project at home . . .  and the next thing you know you ran out of time and you question yourself, "where did the time go?"  Let us not make the same mistake when it comes to the ultimate end of this earthly existence.  Let us not save all of our preparation for the "next life" for the end of "this life."  Let us begin now, and every day, to prepare for our "Heavenly Home"  Our Lord already promised us that He goes to prepare a place for us:  "And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto Myself; that where I am, there ye may be also." (St. John 14:3)  Let us prepare for our Heavenly home right now by making efforts to spend time with God each and every day: read Holy Scriptures; spend time in prayer; and reach out to Our Blessed Saviour right now.

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, May 11th at 9:30 AM as we gather together at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear the Word of God speaking to us in a powerful way.  Join us as we join together in song.  And join us as we come forward to receive Our Blessed Lord in His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.

You can learn more about our parish at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/




Second Sunday after Easter, Sunday, May 4th, 2014

In the Gospel for today's Mass, the Second Sunday after Easter, we hear Our Blessed Lord describe Himself as a "good shepherd:"  "JESUS said, I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.." (St. John 10)  Notice that He does not just describe Himself as a "shepherd" but He specifically describes Himself as a "good shepherd."  He tells us the reason why He says this:  " . .  . the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep."  Our Lord is indeed the Good Shepherd!  He has in fact laid down His life for His sheep . . .  us!!!

In the Book of the Prophet Ezekiel, we hear the following:  "As a shepherd seeketh out his flock in the day that he is among his sheep that are scattered; so will I seek out my sheep, and will deliver them out of all places where they have been scattered in the cloudy and dark day."  (Ezekiel 34:12)

The Good Shepherd has indeed sought for us where we have been scattered.   As sheep are scattered, not paying attention, but are focused solely on eating and filling themselves, not paying attention to anything else.  As human beings, we are similar to the sheep in the regard that  we also have been scattered, mainly because we become focused solely on what we are focused on at the time:  wealth; possessions; drink; wine; drugs; power; envy; jealousy; hatred; ourselves and our pleasures . . . .   all these different things have led us down various paths and directions and as a result have been scattered.   But Our Blessed Lord has sought for us.  He has searched for us no matter where our travels have taken us.  And He has laid down His life for us . . .  on the Cross at Calvary!  We just have to respond and give our life to Him!  We  need to give our life to the Good Shepherd.    We were scattered but He sought for us:  "'I will seek out my sheep, and deliver them .  . . ."  Let us seek for the Good Shepherd!

St. Margaret Anglican Church gathers for Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is said at the Chapel at Marquette Manor on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road.

Join us for Mass as we gather to hear God's word.  Join us as we gather as God's family to worship Him.  Join with your brothers and sisters as we all take one hour out of our busy schedules and dedicate that hour to the worship of Our Blessed Saviour!  And then receive the Precious Body and Blood of Christ, the Good Shepherd Who laid down His life for His sheep!

For more information about our parish, please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



First Sunday after Easter, Sunday, April 27th, 2014

Have you ever had the experience of starting a project or a job and then you discovered shortly thereafter that you did not have the correct tool or instrument to do the work?  And then you had to stop the project that you were working on until you obtained the correct tool.  In order to do certain tasks, you need certain tools.  In order to accomplish certain jobs, you have to have the correct instrument to finish your task.  Whether it is something as big as needing a stove in order to cook or something as simple as a certain type of a screwdriver to remove a screw.  Whether it is something small or something big, we have to have the right tools to do the job right and correctly.  In the First Epistle of St. John, we hear the following:  "WHATSOEVER is born of God overcometh the world. . . ."  (I St. John 5:4)  In other words, St. John is telling us that in order to overcome the world we need to be "born of God."  He is telling us that we need to have God in our lives if we want to overcome the world.  Sometimes we hear phrases such as "the world is a rat-race" or "it's a dog eat dog world out there."  In many ways, these are accurate descriptions in regards to the world in which we live.  It's a mean world out there with lot's of dangers.  Thus, to overcome the world we need to have the assistance of Our Heavenly Father.  Without Him, we can accomplish nothing.  We need to put our faith and trust in the Creator of the world.  This comes through having a relationship with Him and living for Him.  St. John continues:  "Who is he that overcometh the world, but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God . . ." (I St. John 5:5)  Put your trust in the One that has overcome the world . .. . the One Who has overcome death . . .  the One Who has come to forgive you your sins:  Jesus Christ!

Join us on Sunday, April 27th, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass for the First Sunday after Easter.  Mass is celebrated in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we hear the Word of God preached from the King James Version of the Bible.  Listen to the Word of God speaking to you.   Spend time as God's family in solemn worship of God, taking time out of the busy schedule of life and devoting one hour to God.  And receive Our Blessed Lord in His Precious Body and Blood to help sustain us and nourish us for the journey called life.



Easter Sunday, April 20th, 2014

In the life of a Christian, we learn over time to expect the unexpected.  Certainly, this was true for the apostles and the disciples of Our Blessed Lord.  Imagine what those three or four days were like for the disciples and apostles.  It was a roller-coaster of emotions and feelings mixed in with confusion and excitement and sadness and frustration along with, ultimately, disappointment . . . .  And if all of this confusion of feelings and emotions were not enough, then on the third day, the word began to circulate that the tomb was empty!  "And they went out quickly, and fled from the sepulchre; for they trembled and were amazed: neither said they any thing to any man; for they were afraid.." (St. Mark 16;1ff)  What could all of this mean?!?  Expect the unexpected when you are a disciple .. . . .

Things have not changed much in two-thousand years, give or take, for Christian disciples.   As Christians, we still deal with a wide range of emotions and feelings as we work our way through life.   Sometimes we are happy, sad, excited, disappointed, frustrated, confused, joyful . . . . . But we know that we when we dedicated our life to God, we soon realize that God will be with us no matter what.  The Apostles did not have an easy life and neither will we . . . . but God does promise to never leave us when we become His disciples.  Easter is a sure sign that God will never leave us abandoned.  Even when things look the darkest, we know that God will be there for us.  Expect the unexpected.

Two opportunities for Mass this weekend:

On Saturday, April 19th, 2014, Holy Saturday Mass will be celebrated at the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit in Greenfield, Indiana at 6:00 PM.  Mass is celebrated in the Chapel in the Park, which is located at the corner of North Apple Street and US 40, just east of downtown Greenfield.

On Easter Sunday, April 20th, 2014, Easter Sunday Mass will be celebrated at St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road at Marquette Manor.  Please note that Mass today will not be held in the Chapel but will be held on the Fourth Floor.

Please join us for either Mass as we celebrate the glorious Resurrection of Our Blessed Saviour!  Join us as we celebrate God's faithfulness to His people.  Listen to God's word and also receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood to sustain us for the journey of life.  And, most importantly, take time out of your busy schedule to dedicate time to God!  Spend quality time with Him away from the rush of your busy life.



Palm Sunday, Sunday, April 13th, 2014

In the Second Chapter of the Letter to the Philippians, we hear the following:  " .  .  . He humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the Cross."  Certainly, the hardest thing for human being to achieve is the fine art of humility.  It is very difficult for us to be truly humble.  Even when we are put in the position of being corrected . . . either by a boss or a spouse or someone else . . .  very often our automatic response to the correction is "Yes, that is true, BUT . . . ." and then we put in some qualifying explanation to help explain why we did what we did.  It is difficult for us to be truly humble because I do not believe it is in our DNA!  We have to be correct . . . we have to be right  . . .  we have to be the best . . . we have to be number one!  But as we picture the image of Our Blessed Saviour carrying His Cross, we see the perfect image of "humility!"  Our Blessed Lord "humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the Cross!"  As it is so often said, we have a God Who does not ask us to do anything that He has not done first Himself.  In other words, He does not expect us to do things that He did not do Himself.  In becoming a human being, Our Blessed Saviour humbled Himself, bore the burden of the Cross, was humiliated, and even suffered a painful death!  He does not ask us to do anything or to endure anything that He was not willing to endure Himself!  Praise God that we have such a faithful God Who is willing to endure everything that we endure even unto death!

Join us on Sunday, April 13th, 2014 as we celebrate Palm Sunday.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  After Mass, join us for our Coffee Hour where we enjoy delicious goodies and good fellowship with one another.



Fifth Sunday of Lent (Passion Sunday), Sunday, April 6th, 2014

From the 8th Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear a conversation between Our Blessed Lord and the Jewish leaders, which takes a dramatic turn.  Our Lord responds to the Jews:  "He that is of God heareth God's words."  It is valuable for those of us who claim to be Christians to focus on these words of advice from Our Blessed Saviour.  In the age that we live, especially, we know that we are bombarded by "noises:"  Television; Radio; Music; Traffic; Talk: and sometimes all at the same time!  Factor into this, the fact that we are constantly facing things that are trying to get our attention:  Computer; Internet; Social Media; Texts; Work; Chores; Jobs; etc; etc; etc . . . . . You get the picture.  We are constantly faced with people and things that are competing to get our attention.  I know well from my own personal experience that unless I am paying attention to something, I will not hear it.  For example, I may have the news playing but if I am focused on doing something else I won't be paying attention to what is said.  It was playing, I was listening, but I wasn't paying attention to it, and, thus, I missed it.  Sometimes, spiritually speaking, this is how it is with God speaking to us:  there are too many other things taking our attention away from God and we can not hear what God is saying to us.  We need to learn to turn off the "outside noises" from our life so that we can listen to God.  This is not easy to do but it is something that is necessary.  One valuable way to do this is to take one hour out of your busy schedule and come to church:  hear the Word of God; listen to what He is saying to us; receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament and dedicate this time to worship of God.

The Mass at St. Margaret of Scotland Parish  is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God and receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament.  Take one hour of your busy week and dedicate it to God.  The "world" gets so much of your attention, dedicate at least one hour to God!



Fourth Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 30th, 2014

For the Mass from the Fourth Sunday of Lent, we hear the story of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes from the Sixth Chapter of St. John's Gospel and Our Lord asks St. Philip a very direct question: "He saith unto Philip, Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?" Of course, Our Lord knew what would be done but He was asking this question to test the Apostles to see what their respo...nse would be. If we get hungry for a certain type of food, we have to know where to find that food. For example, if we get craving for Chinese food we won't go to Taco Bell. We have to know where to get what we are looking for. " . . . from whence shall we buy bread . . . " Later in this chapter, Our Lord responds: "For the Bread of God is He which cometh down from Heaven, and giveth life unto the world" Our Lord is the Bread of God. He is the One Who was sent from Heaven. We go to Him if we want the "Bread from Heaven" . . . we go to Him if we want the Living Waters . . . we go to Him for the Body and Blood of Christ. If we want true satisfaction in life, we go to the One that will give us true satisfaction. If we need healing, we go to the One that will give healing. Our Blessed Saviour is the One who heals us. He is the one Who satisfies us. Half the battle is sometimes knowing where to go.

Join us for Mass on Sunday, March 30th, 2014 at 9:30 AM. We meet at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis. Join us as we worship Our Blessed Lord, hear His Word, and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood at Communion time.





Third Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 23, 2014

In the Fifth Chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians, we hear about the notion of being "children of light:"  "For ye were sometimes darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord: walk as children of light:" (Ephesians 5:1 ff)  If you have ever had the experience of trying to do something in a dark place, and not being able to accomplish your task and then you find the light and you discover that this made all the difference in the world and you accomplished your task much more easily.  God is the Light in the world and without Him, the world is dark and much more difficult to accomplish tasks that we are called to do.  In Christ, we are now "children of Light."  And we should always remember that the light will shine through us and will shine to the world through us:  through our actions; through our words; through our love.  And we are called to share that light with those around us.  We are reminded not to darken that light with our former ways of doing things . .  of treating people wrongly . . .  of thinking wrong thoughts . . . rather, show your light to the world.  You are Christ's ambassador to those around you:  your family; your friends; your neighbors; your coworkers . . .  Show the Light of Christ to those around you!

St. Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We are a loving community of traditional Anglicans who listen to the Word of God in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We believe truly in Our Lord's words:  "This is My Body, This is My Blood" and that we He is Truly Present in the Blessed Sacrament that we receive at Communion time.  After Mass, we have a wonderful Coffee Hour, filled with delicious goodies.

Please consider joining us for Mass so that you can give back some of your busy week to God and listen to His Word.

More information can be found at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Second Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 16th, 2014

In the Fifteenth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel we hear the story of the woman whom Our Blessed Lord was impressed with.  He was impressed with her faithfulness and I am quite sure He was also impressed with, quite frankly, her "way with words," so to speak.  For we hear the story of the woman who begs favour from Our Lord and He states to her that it is not right to give scraps from the table to the dogs but she was very clever and stated that these same dogs at the very least eat the crumbs from the table.  And Our Lord replied:  "O woman, great is thy faith: be it unto thee even as thou wilt."  You see, not only was this woman faithful . . .. she was humble.   We need to possess both of these attributes in life.  This woman acknowledged her need and she also acknowledged, through asking favour, the power of the one she was beseeching the favour from.  We only ask help from people whom we know can help us.  For example, if my car needs to be fixed, I go to the mechanic . .  . I don't go to the dentist.  Likewise, if I need advice on legal matters, I don't go to the carpenter . . . I go to a lawyer.  We go to people whom we trust can help us, or have the appropriate knowledge of the situation that we need help with.  When we go to God with our problems, we know that God is the One Who can help us.  And, in so doing, we acknowledge that He is greater than us in power, knowledge, ability, etc.  We humble ourselves and acknowledge that He is the Lord of our life. This is the lesson that we should learn today from the woman in St. Matthew's Gospel.

Mass is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  We hear God's Word speaking to us through Holy Scripture.  We believe that Our Lord is truly present in His Precious Body and Precious Blood.  We believe Our Lord's words:  "This is My Body and This is My Blood" as we receive Him in Holy Communion.  We spend our time gathered together as God's family worshiping Our Heavenly Father and listening to His Word.  Join us and give this time back to God.   Take one hour out of your busy schedule and dedicate it to God.



First Sunday of Lent, March 9th, 2014

On Sunday, March 9th, we celebrate the First Sunday of Lent.  In Chapter Six of the Second letter to the Corinithians, we hear the following:  "WE then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain . . . ."  (II Coninthians 6:1 ff)  Have you ever had the experience where you put a lot of time and effort into something and then when you are finally finished, the reaction you get is less than what you expected?  Perhaps it is a report for work you spent a lot of effort on and your boss says, "That's fine" and that's all.  Or you spend a lot of your time and effort taking care of someone's problem in order to make it right for them, and you barely get any sort of gratefulness in return?  Human beings are usually pretty quick to help out but, also as humans, we like to have our efforts appreciated.  We do not like to like to see that our hard work has been done in vain.  We don't mind working hard . . . we don't mind putting our efforts into something worthwhile . . . but we do mind seeing all of our hard work go down the drain for nothing.  In a certain sense, this is what St. Paul is saying to the young church at Corinth as he begins this Sixth chapter.  In other words, don't let God's hard work be in vain.  God sent His Son into the world  . . .  but He didn't have to . . . Our Blessed Saviour taught and preached to countless multitudes, letting them know about the Kingdom of God . . .  He was mocked and humiliated . . . . He was made to carry His Cross . . . and ultimately died on the Cross .  ..  .  and the saddest part about all of that, is that for some that Sacrifice that Our Lord made was still in vain because they will still reject Our Blessed Lord.  During this Lent, let us not take Our Lord's Sacrifice in van.  Let us always remember Our Lord's efforts and what He has done for us with gratefulness and love.  And let us show our efforts to Our Blessed Saviour in return.

Mass is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  We hear God's Word speaking to us through Holy Scripture.  We believe that Our Lord is truly present in His Precious Body and Precious Blood.  We believe Our Lord's words:  "This is My Body and This is My Blood" as we receive Him in Holy Communion.  We spend our time gathered together as God's family worshiping Our Heavenly Father and listening to His Word.  Join us and give this time back to God.   Take one hour out of your busy schedule and dedicate it to God.



Quinquagesima, March 2nd, 2014

In the 18th Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel for today's Mass, we are witness to Our Blessed Lord taking the Twelve Apostles to Himself and letting them know how He will suffer and die and then rise on the third day.  In this same passage we are told about the blind man who hears that Jesus of Nazareth is coming near.  And he yells and yells to get Our Lord's attention.  The more he is told to be quiet . . . the louder he gets.  Finally, Our Lord takes notice of him and listens to his request.  And Our Lord responds:  "And Jesus said unto him, Receive thy sight: thy faith hath saved thee."

We are called by faith.  All of us have faith but the problem is that in our day and age our faith is often placed in the wrong things.  We place our faith in people that ultimately let us down .. . or we place our faith in objects that ultimately break down or fall apart . . . we place our faith in things that we should not have any faith in to begin with, such as drugs or alcohol . . . . Quinquagesima is the last Sunday before Lent begins.  We should use Lent as an opportunity to get our priorities straight.  We should use these forty days, as the blind man did, to call out for Our Lord's attention.  We should continue to call to Him until He responds.  When the blind man was made aware that Jesus was near, he focused all of his energy on getting the attention of Our Divine Saviour.  He kept calling and calling and calling until Our Lord responded.  The blind man kept his attention and his resolve fixed on Our Lord.  That is exactly what we are called to do:  focus our attention on Our Blessed Saviour until He responds.  Most of us get too distracted by other things to keep our attention fixed solely on Our Blessed Saviour.  Let us use this Lent to keep our focus fixed solely on Our Blessed Saviour and wait for Him to respond.

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is held each and every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  Come join us as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Come receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion because we have faith in Our Lord's words:  "This is My Body, This is My Blood . . . . "

If you have any questions or would like to find our more information, please visit our wesite:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Sexagesima, Sunday, February 23, 2014

On Sunday, February 23, 2014, we celebrate the Second Sunday before Lent, or Sexagesima, as we come closer to the holy season of Lent, the Church provides the 8th Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel for our hearing today.  In this 8th Chapter of the Gospel, St. Luke reminds us of Our Lord speaking to the Apostles and relating the parable of the Sower sowing the seed.  "Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God"  (St Luke 8:4 ff)  In this parable, Our Lord is pointing out that seed can be sown but it all ultimately depends on what kind of soil the seed lands upon.  In a similar vein, we can tell people all day long about God, but it depends entirely on if they are open to hearing about Him or not.  To those who are not open, our words will mean nothing.  To those who have an open heart and are open to hearing about God, our words will have deeper meaning.  We might have said the same exact words but the outcomes were exactly opposite;  i.e., this had more to do with the disposition of the hearer than it did the message presented.

The other thing that calls our attention in today's Gospel passage is the fact that Our Divine Saviour makes a distinction between saying something point-blank and saying other things in parables.  We know from reading Scripture, that Our Lord used parables to present points that He was trying to make or to convey messages.  The parables were not necessarily true in the literal sense but their point was accurate.  In a similar way, we may say something that may not be literally true but it conveys the point (e.g., "I must have redone that report a thousand times and it still isn't right!!!!!")  Certainly, we probably didn't re-do the report a thousand times but the phrase "a thousand times" conveys the point that we did it many, many times.  In order to understand the meaning of things, it is very important to know the context of what is being spoken and to know the person making the statement.  The Apostles knew Our Blessed Lord.  They knew Him because they spent time with Him.  They knew Him because they lived with Him . . . they listened to His words . . . they saw Him live His life . . .  in other words, they knew Him because they spent time with Him.  And in getting to know Him, they understood what He was trying to say, what point He was trying to make . . . . even when He spoke in parables.  We get to know people only through interaction with them, watching them, living with them, etc.  You know your spouse or your children very well because you live with that person and spend a lot of time with them.  And through this time spent, you begin to know that person and what they like, what they don't like, what they will do, etc.   This is true of God as well.  We only get to know God by having a personal relationship with Him.   Get to know God.  Have a personal relationship with Him.  Get to know Him.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Come join with us as we celebrate Mass and listen to the Word of God as found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  As Anglo-Catholics, we firmly believe that Our Lord is truly present in Holy Communion and that we receive His Body and Blood when we receive Holy Communion.  After Mass, join us for our coffee hour where we share lots of goodies and delicious treats.





Septuagesima, February 16th, 2014

On Sunday, February 16, 2014 we celebrate Septuagesima Sunday, the beginning of what are referred to as the "Gesima Sundays," in other words, these are the "Pre-Lent" Sundays.  The Church begins to get prepared for the holy season of Lent.  In today's Epistle from the Ninth Chapter of the First Letter to the Corinthians, we hear:  "KNOW ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain. . . . Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible." (I Corinthians 9:24ff)  St. Paul points out the example of athletes who train to win the competition.  They strengthen the body in order to win.  St. Paul points out that these athletes train hard to win a crown that will soon disappear, as he says, it will corrupt away.  But, as St. Paul is pointing out, Christians are also in a race as well.  We are in a race to win a crown . . .  our crown, though, is eternal life with Jesus, Our Saviour.  As such, we should train even harder to win a heavenly crown that will not fade away.  Two points, here:  Number One, as St. Paul points out, everything in life takes practice and training in order to do something well.  This is certainly true when it comes to being  a Christian.  We need to practice the art of being a Christian every day and we do this by: reading the Scriptures; obeying God; listening to God; and treating others as God would have us treat them.  The second point is that we always have to focus on is the fact that, as Christians, our true blessing will come in Heaven and not here on earth.  While it is true that our lives are filled with blessings:  nice cars, nice homes, nice clothes, many wonderful earthly possessions . . .  as St. Paul points out, these too shall also become corruptible and will fade away one day.   While it is nice to enjoy these things while we possess them, we are still called to keep our attention fixed on the true "prize" that we are called to win:  Eternal life with Our Blessed Saviour in Heaven.  That is where we should keep our eyes firmly fixed and not diverted by material things that we mistake for blessings.

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, February 16th, 2014 at 9:30 AM as we gather to celebrate Mass.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood for Holy Communion.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.



Fifth Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, February 9th, 2014

In the Letter to the Colossians, St. Paul is writing on how exactly a Christian should act and their attitudes towards one another.  We hear the following from the beginning of the Epistle for today's Mass:  "Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, a heart of compassion, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering; forbearing one another, and forgiving one another."  (Colossians 3:12)  He goes on to speak about forgiveness and "forgiving one another as Christ has forgiven you."  If we were to look at things logically and simply the logical argument would go something along these lines:  Humans are not perfect; therefore, humans make mistakes;  End of story.  But it is not quite as simple as that.  We have to throw into the equation that human beings have emotions and therefore, on rare occasion, get their feelings hurt . . . . rightly or wrongly . . . . and this is probably where the difficult part comes into play.  As Christians, we always have to look toward the example of Our Blessed Saviour, pure and simple, as difficult as that may be because let's face it, He is a "tough act to follow" when it comes to living a perfect life.    But just because  something is difficult to do, we are still called to give the effort 100 percent effort as Christians.  You see, that is what Christ gave us . . . . He gave 100 percent.  Even when it came to forgiveness, He forgave 100 percent.   So often when we "forgive," do we really do it 100 percent?  Isn't it true that often times when we say we forgive someone, yes, we do forgive that person for the wrong they have done, but often don't we keep it in the back of our mind what they did to us and keep it in our "memory file."  We say we forgive but we don't forget.  Thus, that forgiveness is only 90 percent . .  or 80 percent  . . . or maybe 75 percent.  Christ give 100 percent from the Cross when He died for our sins.  That's how we know He gave His all because He gave all of His life in sacrifice hanging from the Cross to free you and I from our sins.  So next time you are called to forgive someone, remember Our Blessed Saviour's Sacrifice . . .  He did not just give 70 or 80 or 99 percent . . . ,. No, He gave 100 percent and that is what we are called to do . . . . give 100 percent of our love and forgiveness as Christians even though that may be very difficult at times.  Do you think it was any easier dying on the Cross?

St. Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We worship Our Blessed Lord at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.   Come join us for Mass as we worship together as God's family.  Take one hour out of your busy schedule and step out of the business and rush of the rest of the week and use this quiet time to spend time with God . . .  hear His Word . .. . and receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament.  If you have any questions, please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/





Presentation of Christ in the Temple, Sunday, February 2, 2014

In the Second Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel for today's Mass, we hear the story of St. Joseph and Our Lady presenting the Child Jesus in the Temple.  Simeon prophesied the greatness of this Child and then he spoke these words to the Blessed Mother:  "Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again of many in Israel; and for a sign which shall be spoken against; (yea, a sword shall pierce through thy own soul also,)" (St. Luke 2:22ff)  To say the least, these words, along with all the words that Simeon prophesied that day, must have shocked both St. Joseph and St. Mary, or at the very least caused them to wonder what all of these things meant not only for them but for their Child.  " . ..  and a sword shall pierce through thy own soul also . . . "  As we know, Our Lady's life was filled with much joy.  When we think about it, in the entire history of mankind, who was more blessed than anyone else if it was not Our Lady?  She had the distinct honour of being chosen not only to give birth to the Saviour of the world but to spend over thirty years in His presence.  She was with Him throughout His entire life.  But despite these joys and honours, we know that she also had sadness and sorrow as well.  To see her Son hanging from the Cross and then ultimately die a cruel death, knowing He was totally innocent.  How horrible that would be for any mother, any parent, quite frankly, but how much more so for her?  And yet we know from the words of Simeon and from the example of Our Lady that there will indeed be sorrow in our life in addition to the joy.  We were never promised that our life would be perfect or that all sorrows or setbacks  . . .  minor or major . . . would be taken away once we became a Christian.  No, there will still be sorrows, and frustrations, and setbacks for the committed Christian.  But for those who are dedicated to God, we are assured that Christ will always be with us  . . .  in the good times and the bad.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday morning in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Please join us as we hear the Word of God preached from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  At St. Margaret, we know that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in His Precious Body and Blood and that each time we approach the altar, we truly receive Him each and every time we receive Holy Communion.  After Mass, join us for Coffee Hour where we enjoy delicious goodies and each others company.

For more information, please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Third Sunday After Epiphany, Sunday, January 26th, 2014

In the Second Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear the familiar story of the Miracle at Cana, where Our Blessed Lord turned water into wine.  For those of us who have read the Bible our entire lives, in particular the Gospels, it is easy for us to overlook the miraculous works of Our Lord because we are so used to seeing Him perform miracles all throughout the Gospel accounts.  But if we are not paying attention we may miss something, we may overlook something.  You see, in this recounting of what happened at the Wedding Feast of Cana, buried deep within the story, we hear some of the most important words ever spoken in the entire Bible:  "His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it." (St. John 2:1ff)  Here, Our Lady is telling those in charge of the wedding feast to do whatever her Son tells them to do.  She should know what she is talking about . . .  this is her Son.  She raised Him.  She saw Him grow to become an adult.  The reason she is so confident in what she states is because she spent time with Him every day of His life.  "Do whatever He tells you . . . ."  We, too, are called to spend time with Our Blessed Lord everyday.  If we spend quality time with Our Saviour on a daily basis, we will also have confidence just like Our Lady did when she gave the advice, "do whatever He tells you . . ."  We need to follow this advice as well and this can only be done by making a point to listen to what He is telling us and we can only accomplish this by making a point to listen to Him.  Listen to what Our Lord is saying to you . . .  pay attention to what He is saying to you . . .  heed His advice.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass every Sunday morning at the Chapel of Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Join us as we hear the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We believe that Our Lord is truly present in the Precious Body and Blood which we receive at Communion time.  Receive Our Precious Saviour in Holy Communion to be nourished and strengthened by Him.  After Mass, stay for our Coffee Hour where we have lots of delicious goodies.



Join us on Sunday, January 19th, 2014

Please make a point to join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, January 19th, 2014 for a very special Mass.  On that Sunday, the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit (APA), Greenfield, Indiana, will join us for Mass.   It is fitting that these two parishes,  one an APA parish and the other an ACA parish, will celebrate Mass together in the Octave for Christian Unity.  So, if you are able to attend on Sunday, January 19th, 2014, we would certainly encourage you to do so.  Join us as our two parishes join together for that Sunday to worship Our Blessed Saviour as one family.



Second Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 19th, 2014

In Romans, Chapter 12, we hear the following: "Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate." In this twelfth chapter of the Letter to the Romans, St. Paul focuses on the aspects of the Christian community and how fellow Christians should treat one another and how they live communally. Among the many wonderful points that St. Paul makes in this passage, one of the best is that Christians "should not mind high things" and also to "condescend to men of low estate." In the society in which we are a part, the focus seems to be on acquiring power or things of wealth. We want to move up in authority where we work; we want to have nice things; we want to live in nice houses; we want to have nice possessions; we want to have lots of money; etc. Now, having these things are not necessarily bad in and of themselves, but no matter how good these things are, we have to constantly remind ourselves that ultimately these things are only temporary pleasures compared to eternity. A Christian does not build up "riches" by the possessions he or she owns here on earth; a Christian builds up Heavenly treasures by how he or she acts and how they treat others. " . . . but condescend to men of low estate." St. Paul is reminding all of us on how we treat others. Even if we are rich and powerful, it does not cost us anything to treat others with respect and love and courtesy. And, in so doing, we are truly imitating Our Blessed Saviour, because He truly did "condescend to men of low estate" by leaving Heaven and becoming Man. 

St. St Margaret Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM for Mass. We celebrate Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis. Join us as we listen to the Word of God as found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Worship Our Blessed Lord with us as we spend time with Him listening to His Word and receiving Him in Holy Communion.
Find out more about our church at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/




Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 12th, 2014

In the Tenth Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, we hear St. Peter speaking in the house of Cornelius, the Centurion, whom we are reminded was a very devout man.  St. Peter states:  "And He commanded us to preach unto the people, and to testify that it is He which was ordained of God to be the Judge of (the) quick and dead."  (Acts 10:42)  What prompts St. Peter to speak his beautiful words here in the tenth chapter of Acts is the fact that when he entered the house of Cornelius, Cornelius bent down and began to worship St. Peter and this made him very uneasy.  This prompted St. Peter to begin his preaching here in the tenth chapter.  We, too, like St. Peter, have been blessed by God.  Similar to St. Peter, we have been chosen by Our Blessed Saviour . . .  hand-picked by Him to be His disciple.  Just like St. Peter, we have seen Our Blessed Lord at work in our life.  And when we reflect on all these things, it causes us to preach about what we know about Our Precious Saviour, to let the world know exactly what He has done in our life.  This is precisely what St. Peter was doing in the house of Cornelius that day:  he was letting Cornelius and everyone else know what God had done for him; how God had affected his life; how Jesus had picked him; and exactly how He had lived His life here on earth.  Again, this is where we can imitate St. Peter as well.  We can let the world know about what God has done for us in our life and how He has personally affected each and every one of us.  And as St. Francis stated:  "Preach at all times . . .  and sometimes even use words"

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday morning in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Please join us as we hear the Word of God preached from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  At St. Margaret, we know that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in His Precious Body and Blood and that each time we approach the altar, we truly receive Him each and every time we receive Holy Communion.  After Mass, join us for Coffee Hour where we enjoy delicious goodies and each others company.

For more information, please visit our website at:

St. Margaret of Scotland Parish




IMPORTANT NEWS:  PLEASE NOTE  
St. Margaret Parish will not meet on Sunday, January 5th, 2014

It is never good to cancel Mass but weather conditions throughout much of the Midwest, including Central Indiana will force us to cancel Mass on Sunday, January 5th, 2014.  Forecasts are calling for possibly 10 to 12 inches of snow on Sunday.  The majority of the snow will supposedly fall during the early Sunday morning hours when people will be driving to church, so it is best to err on the side of caution.  Thank you for your understanding.



Feast of the Epiphany (Transferred), Sunday, January 5, 2014

In this first Sunday of the New Year, we celebrate the Feast of the Epiphany (Transferred) since we will not be together to celebrate the actual feast on January 6th.  In the third chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians, we hear St. Paul write:  "Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ."  (Ephesians 3:8) It is interesting for us to note that when we think of the Feast of the Epiphany, we think of the Three Wise Men (or Three Kings) bearing gifts to the new-born Messiah, and yet, here is St. Paul speaking of the "unsearchable riches of Christ."   In the eyes of the world, the gifts that the three pilgrims brought to the Christ Child were unsearchable riches:  ". .  . and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh." (St. Matthew 2:11)  Here is the lesson that is presented to each one of us who profess to be a Christian:  the true gift, the richest, most valuable possession is not necessarily the one you see with your eyes.  The Three Wise Men were presenting gifts of immense value in the eyes of the world . . . . and yet, the richest\, most valuable gift in that scene was not the gold, nor the frankincense, nor the myrrh . . . . rather, the most valuable gift in that event over two thousand years ago was the gift of that small helpless babe given to the world as a gift from God, through His birth through the Blessed Virgin Mary.  And, as St. Paul says, the grace has been given to him and to each one of us to "preach the unsearchable riches of Christ" to the world.  This is not always easy to accomplish because the eyes of the world are focused on the unsearchable riches of this world:  money; power; clothes; electronics; etc.  And, yet, as is so often the case, the true unsearchable richness is not seen by our eyes . . . because it is hidden.  Hidden in the manger some two thousand years ago . . . hidden in the guise of a poor, working-class family . . . hidden in a small innocent baby.  And yet, here is where the "unsearchable riches" were to be found.  And, just like most "treasures," they have to be searched for in order to be discovered.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please join us for Mass as we worship our Blessed Saviour as God's family.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God as found in the King James Version of the Bible and use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Take some time our of your busy lives and step outside of the ordinary in order to worship God in a reverent, traditional worship.  Receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion to nourish and sustain you for the coming week.  And following Mass, join us for a wonderful Coffee Hour with all sorts of delicious treats.

For more information, please visit our website:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



First Sunday after Christmas, Sunday, December 29th, 2013

In the Fourth Chapter of the Letter to the Galatians, we hear the following:  "God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father. Wherefore thou art no more a servant, but a son; and if a son, then an heir of God through Christ."   It is never good to be "full of ourselves."  In other words, we should never think too highly of ourselves than we ought, but when you consider the fact that God thinks so highly of His creation that not only did He send His Son into the world to save us, but that as a result we are now considered "sons" and "daughters" of God, the honour is beyond comprehension!  Think about it, God has chosen you . . . He has redeemed you . . . He has made you His very own child!  The only thing that we have to do is to respond and then act accordingly.  So often, when we are out and about, we may see a child in a store who is throwing a fit.  And the first thought to our mind is:  "What an ungrateful child" or "spoiled child."  And, yet, when it comes to the spiritual life, are we not "spoiled children" to Our Heavenly Father?  Perhaps, we ignore God completely.  Perhaps, we only approach God when we want something.  Maybe, we don't hear God speaking to us because we are too far away and not paying attention.  We have to always remind ourselves on a daily basis the dignity and honour that God has given to each one of us by being called "son" or "daughter" of the Almighty.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is a traditional Anglican parish, which uses the Anglican Missal and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We also use the King James Version of the Bible.  We believe strongly in Our Lord's words . . .  "this is My Body and this is My Blood" . . . and truly believe that Our Blessed Saviour is truly present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar and we receive Him at Communion time.  Come join us every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM as we gather together as God's family to worship Our Blessed Lord.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Fourth Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

In the Seventh Chapter of the Book of the Prophet Isaiah, we hear the following:  "Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Look, the young woman is with child and shall bear a son, and shall name him Immanuel"  Obviously, the season of Advent is all about being prepared, to be ready.  Sometimes, as we heard above, the Lord will give us a sign but even in that case, we still have to be on the lookout for the sign.  How many times have we traveled somewhere new, a place that we are not familiar with, that we make a point to be aware of the street signs.  We make a point to look for the specific signs and pay attention in order to know where we are going.  So, too, with life in general, God gives us signs but we have to be on the lookout to see the signs.  God speaks to us but we have to pay attention to what He is saying first in order to know what He is speaking.  In the Book of Revelation, we hear:  "Behold, I come as a thief.  Blessed is he that watcheth . .  . " (Revelation 16:15)  The holy season of Advent teaches us to be on watch for the Messiah.  "Blessed is he that watcheth . . . ."  In Advent, we look forward to the coming of Christmas but this "habit" of watchfulness is something we can put into use the whole year.  We can watch for the signs that God gives us.  We can be on watch for when God is speaking to us.  We can be watchful for the times in which God wants to use us as His instrument to make Him known in the world.  How many opportunities have we missed to do these things because we have not been on the watch and were not paying attention.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, December 22nd, 2013 as we celebrate the Fourth Sunday of Advent.  Mass is celebrated at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of  Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Join us as we listen to the Word of God and join together as God's family and listen to Him.



Third Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 15th, 2013

For the Third Sunday of Advent, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speaking the praises of His cousin St. John the Baptist:  "What then did you go out to see? A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. This is the one about whom it is written, `See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way before you.' " (St. Matthew 11:2 ff)  In this passage, Our Blessed Saviour is quoting Scripture from the Book of Malachi:  "Behold, I will send My messenger, and he shall prepare the way before Me: And the Lord, Whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to His temple." (Malachi 3:1)   Two things for us to ponder in regards to these Scripture verses:  Number one, in God, we have such a loving Father that He was not just content to create us and then leave us alone.  No, He loved His creation so much that He not only created us, but He became one of us.  He became a Human Being.  " . .  . and the Lord, Whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to His temple . . ."  The Lord did come to His temple . . . . He came to the world as a little innocent child, Who was the Saviour of the world.  Elsewhere, we read:  "And I will walk among you, and will be your God, and ye shall be my people"  (Leviticus 26:12)  Our Blessed Saviour has indeed walked among us . . . He is Our God and we are His people.

The second thing for us to always consider is that Our Blessed Saviour desires our assistance.  Let me emphasize, He does not require our assistance, rather, He welcomes our assistance.  He created the universe and He created each one of us.  Anyone that powerful does not need my help and, yet, He desires my help.  `See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way before you.'  Like St. John the Baptist . . . like St. Mary . . . like St. Joseph . . .  each one of us are called to prepare the way of the Lord.  We prepare the way of the Lord for others to find God, but we also prepare the way of the Lord to our own hearts.  This is what the holy season of Advent is all about:  to prepare a place for the Christ Child in our hearts.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, December 15th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we come together as God's family and worship Our Blessed Saviour in traditional worship.  Join us as we listen to God's Word found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we spend quality time before Our Blessed Saviour and then receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood.  St. Margaret Parish worships each and every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Coffee Hour follows Mass where delicious goodies and treats are available.  Please consider taking time out of your busy schedule and join us as we prepare a way  for Our Blessed Saviour.

You can find out more about our parish at:
http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Second Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 8th, 2013

On Sunday, December 8th, 2013, St. Margaret of Scotland parish will celebrate the Second Sunday of Advent.  The Epistle for this Mass comes to us from the Fifteenth Chapter of the Letter to the Romans.  The passage from this Epistle ends with:  " Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost."  (Romans 15)  If we were forced to describe the liturgical season of Advent with only one word, I am sure that we could agree on the word:  Hope.  It truly is the season of hope for fallen mankind that we anticipate when the Saviour of the world would be born.  And yet when we look at things purely on the face of things, it would not seem very hopeful.  The Saviour of the world, that was long anticipated, did not ride in on a great horse with a grand army in support, with flags waving and sounds of trumpets.  No, Our Saviour arrived as an innocent little baby, born to a common family, born in a lowly manger on a cold winter night  because nobody would take them in otherwise.  If you did not know any better, I am sure that we would not picture the Saviour of the world as a small baby, born to an impoverished family, with nowhere else to stay other than in a place for animals.  But, then again, if we look at a dying man hanging on a cross, if we didn't know any better, we wouldn't picture that as "victory," either.  It would seem more like "defeat" than "victory."  And yet we know through faith that hope was born in that little manger at Bethlehem and we know that victory truly was earned on that Cross at Calvary.  Sometimes, hope is deceiving to our physical eyes.  We have to look at hope through the eyes of faith if we really want to see how God is working in our lives.  So, use this holy Season of Advent to look at things in a brand new way, the way of faith.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located on the Northwest side of Indianapolis at 8140 N. Township line Road.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Come join us for traditional worship.  We use the Anglican Missal and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  We gather together to join as God's family to listen to His Word and worship Him and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood.  Please join us for Mass and then stay with us afterward for our delicious Coffee Hour.  For more information, visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



First Sunday of Advent, Sunday, December 1st, 2013

On Sunday, December 1st, 2013, we celebrate the First Sunday of Advent, the beginning of the Church Year.  From the Twenty-First Chapter of the Gospel of St. Matthew, we hear the crowds joyfully welcoming Our Divine Saviour into Jerusalem:  "Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the Name of the Lord."  It always amazes me to hear this particular Gospel passage being read on the First Sunday of Advent.  It would seem more appropriate to our ears to hear this particular passage being read in Holy Week.   But we always have to remember that while the Holy Season of Lent is without a doubt a penitential season, Advent is also a penitential season as well.  Both seasons are full of anticipation:  in one, we are awaiting the Glorious Rising from the Tomb; in the other, we are awaiting the Coming of the Christ-Child into our world, born in a manger on a cold Winter's night.  Both seasons are filled with anticipation.  In Advent, the challenge is even more real as we have to fight the secular focus which is always on shopping and gift-buying.  If you are like me, if you hear one more mention of "Black Friday" and "Sales," you are going to scream.  But, again, Advent is a penitential season meant to set ourselves apart from the world as much as possible and focus on the coming of the Christ-Child on Christmas.  Do what you can this year to focus on the Christ-Child.  Use this Advent Season to prepare for His Coming and prepare your heart.  Invite Him into your heart like never before.  Let this Advent Season be a time of preparation, to prepare your heart for the Coming of the Christ-Child.

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is locate at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Mass begins promptly at 9:30 AM, with Coffee Hour following Mass.  Please join us this Advent Season as a way to prepare your heart for the coming of the Christ-Child.



Sunday Next Before Advent, Sunday, November 24th, 2013

In the Sixth Chapter of the Gospel of St. John, we hear the story of the feeding of the Five-Thousand and after everyone had eaten their fill, we hear the following:  "Therefore they gathered them together, and filled twelve baskets with the fragments of the five barley loaves, which remained over and above unto them that had eaten."  We all know how this story goes but the bottom line is that there was not much food to work with in feeding so many people.  But as we heard above, not only were all of the people fed to their fill but there were twelve baskets still left over after everyone was fed.  Two things immediately come to mind:  1)  Oftentimes, the odds seem impossible and God still brings about a miracle.  How often in life do we give up because it seems like we have hit a brick wall and can not go any further?  We limit ourselves.  The Apostles were ready to give up in this instance because, in their minds, how could they feed five thousand people on just a few loaves and fishes?  And, yet, we know that God worked a miracle and did the (seemingly) impossible.  2)  God always gives us more than we deserve.  God does not just give us what we need . . . .  He gives us that and more!  God always goes beyond what we need and gives us so much more than that!  Often, though, we do not realize this fact until later on, after the event.

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, November 24th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we gather for Mass.  Join us in the worship of Our Blessed Saviour as we listen to His Word in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer; receive Him in Holy Communion; and join your brothers and sisters in traditional worship.  St. Margaret worships each and every Sunday at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  After Mass, stay and join us for our Coffee Hour, where we enjoy lots of delicious goodies and good company.




Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Sunday, November 17, 2013

In today's Epistle (I St. John 3:1), we hear the following:  "BEHOLD, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God"  It is good to reflect on the fact that God has chosen us above all other creatures to be His chosen ones.  For elsewhere we hear in Scripture:  "Being made so much better than the angels, as he has by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.  For to which of the angels said he at any time, You are my Son, this day have I begotten you?"  (Hebrews 1:5-6)  In other words, It was the intention that Our Blessed Saviour was born as a human being and not as an angel.  God proves the love that He has for us by sending His Son to humanity.  We should take time to reflect on the fact that we are each chosen to be called the sons and daughters of God.  The God that has created the entire universe has chosen us as His sons and daughters.  He has sent His Son to be a human being in order to redeem fallen humanity from its' sins.  This fact should boggle the mind when you think about "what manner of love" the Father has for each one of us.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, November 17th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we gather together for Mass.  Spend time in the Presence of Our Blessed Saviour and receive Him in Holy Communion.  Hear His Word preached from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  St. Margaret Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.



Bishop Shaver and Mrs. Carol Shaver visiting St. Margaret Parish

On Sunday, November 10th, 2013, St. Margaret Parish had the pleasure of worshiping with His Grace, Bishop and Mrs. Carol Shaver.  What a pleasant surprise when they arrived for Mass.  We consider them to be very good friends of the parish and they know that they are always welcome whenever they are in Indianapolis.

Please see the following link to see pictures of their visit to St. Margaret:

Fr. Todd's Sermon and Pictures of Visit to St. Margaret



Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, November 10, 2013

In the Ninth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear the telling of Our Divine Saviour coming to the house of the ruler, whose daughter had been very sick for a long time and had, in fact, died.  And this ruler implored Our Saviour to come to his home and lay hands on his daughter so that she would live again:  "And when Jesus came into the ruler's house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise, he said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn."  Now, in all fairness to those who laughed, we need to ask if we found ourselves under the same circumstances, and some stranger came in and announced that our friend was not dead, I am sure that we would be just as shocked and more than likely our reaction would be the same.  But, that being said, I am sure that Our Lord must have been hurt or insulted by the response of the people and yet He did not come to the house for their approval . . .  He came to the house for the sake of the girl and her father.  In other words, He ignored the laughing and the ridicule and went to work.  And the results were astounding.  Sometimes, we are also laughed at and ridiculed for standing firm in our faith in today's society.  But we must always keep in mind that holding fast to the faith requires determination on our part, no matter what.   People will, at times, mock us and "laugh us to scorn" for standing firm in our Christian faith but as St. Matthew so kindly pointed out to us, people laughed at Our Blessed Saviour as well.  The key is to stand firm with God.  It is never easy to be the target of scorn  but we have to realize that if we choose to stand for what's right, we will automatically become the target of those who choose to do wrong.  Stand with God and you know that you are always in good company.

Join us on Sunday, November 10th, 2013 as we celebrate the Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  At St. Margaret, we believe that Our Lord is with us truly in His Body and Blood at Communion time.  Come receive His Precious Body and Blood to nourish and strengthen your for your journey.  Listen to His Word preached in both the 1928 BCP and the King James Version of the Bible.  And then join us after Mass for some delicious food at our Coffee Hour.




Twenty-Third Sunday after Trinity, November 3, 2013

In the Twenty-Second Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear Our Lord say:  "Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's"  Needless to say, this quote is one of the most remembered quotes found in Scripture.  Certainly, in this response, Our Lord is being very direct in His response.    And He needs to be because He is addressing something that affects most of us.  There is no need to remind any of us that we all lead busy lives.  Even when we are retired, we seem to be busier than when we were working.  And as such, we wear many different hats.  Think of all the different "hats" you might have worn in your life-time:  Son; Daughter; Parent; Student; Teacher; Employee; Boss; Husband; Wife; Neighbor; Home-Owner; Volunteer; etc. etc.  And the list can go on and on.  In each of these roles that I have described above, and countless others, we all have a different role that we play.  The role of a parent is far different from the role we played as a child.  The role that a boss plays is different than that of an employee.  So in each of these positions, we are called to play a different role, depending on the situation.  But throughout each of these "roles" that we play, we are called to put our Christianity into it as much as possible.  We need to find a way to perform our "roles" and do what we are called to do but at the same time never forget that ultimately we are Christians first and foremost.  Today's Gospel passage reminds us that Christians are citizens of two worlds:  the Heavenly world and the earthly world.   We are "dual-citizens," in that respect.  And it will not always be easy to "coexist" between the two.  But that is what we are called to do:  live as a human being but do it in a Christian manner.

St. Margaret Anglican Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, just South of 86th and Township Line Road.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning, which is followed by a Coffee Hour with all kinds of delicious goodies and wonderful fellowship.  Come join us as we listen to the Word of God found in the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we take time out of our busy weeks and spend time in reverence and worship of Our Blessed Saviour.  And then receive Him in the Most Blessed Sacrament so that we can be nourished for the week ahead.



Christ the King, Sunday, October 27, 2013

In the Eighteenth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, the evangelist paints a picture for us of the encounter between Pilate and Our Blessed Lord.  We hear the following:  "Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto truth. "  What do we make of this dialogue?  First of all, Our Lord's first response to Pilate when He says "Thou sayest that I am a king" is very important because, quite frankly,  this is the question that we have to ask ourselves:  Is Jesus my King?  Those who claim to be royalty, kings, queens, etc. are normally such because they are born into a royal line or heritage, if you will.  We also have to face the fact that these persons are allowed to express their royalty because the people, in general, recognize their claim to the royal title.   Who do we recognize as our king?  Do we see Christ as King?  Do we treat Him as King?  Sometimes when we treat someone very well, whether it be a loved one, a relative, a friend, etc, we say that they were "treated like royalty."  How do we treat Our Blessed Saviour?  Do we treat Him like "royalty"?  Do we treat Him like a King?  Do we recognize Him as Our King?  When Our Blessed Lord saw Nathanael, He approached him and Nathanael responded unto Him:  "Rabbi, Thou art the Son of God: Thou art the King of Israel."  (St. John 1:49)   We need to say the same thing to Jesus:  "You are My King!"  The recognition and acknowledgement of royalty comes from within us.  We are the ones that acknowledge a person as a king or queen.  Thus, we have to ask ourselves a very important question:  Is Christ my King?  Is He the King of my life?

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, just South of 86th Street.  Mass begins at 9:30AM.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour.  Listen to the Word of God and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood!  After Mass is finished, please join us for our coffee hour as we enjoy delicious goodies.



Twenty-First Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 20th, 2013

In the Fourth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear the passage concerning the Nobleman's son that was gravely ill.  The Nobleman found Our Blessed Saviour and implored His assistance in making his son well again.  "Then said Jesus unto him, Except ye see signs and wonders, ye will not believe. The nobleman saith unto him, Sir, come down ere my child die. Jesus saith unto him, Go thy way; thy son liveth. And the man believed the word that Jesus had spoken unto him, and he went his way."  It is certain that Our Lord was not against healing the Nobleman's son.  We find many examples where He cures those gravely ill or on the verge of death.  But it seems that He was simply making a point that we should have faith enough that our belief is not dependent on what we see with our eyes.   Especially in our own age, we have to see everything with our own eyes before we will believe it and even then we might still be skeptical in the back of our minds concerning the whole matter.  Twenty-four hour news channels and sports channels; the internet; You-tube; etc.  Everything is filmed and blogged about from major events to the seemingly unimportant, mundane things of life.  Every story is pulled apart and every minute aspect of a story is magnified and looked at.  We have to see everything .. . know everything . . . understand everything.  But Our Blessed Lord is telling us that with God, we can have faith alone.  We do not have to depend on seeing signs and wonders with Him.  We can be assured that God will take care of our needs and we do not need proof.  Our proof consists in the fact that Our Blessed Saviour was born as a human being and that He died on the Cross for our sins.

Please join us on Sunday, October 20th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the Twenty-First Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Come join us as we hear the Word of God, listen to the King James Version of the Bible, us the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.



Twentieth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 13th, 2013

In the Fifth Chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians we hear the following:  "Wherefore be ye not unwise, but understanding what the will of the Lord is. And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit"  In this passage we hear St. Paul stressing where our importance should be focused, not on drinking and carrying on, but on Our Blessed Saviour.  In life, there never seems to be enough time for everything that we need to do.  This even includes, unfortunately, time for God.  But we must do everything in our power to make time for God on a daily basis.  "Be filled with the Spirit!"  In other words, be filled with God!  Fill your life with the things of the holy and holiness with naturally flow into every area of your life!

Join St. Margaret Church for Mass on Sunday, October 13th, 2013 as we celebrate the Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the Chapel at Marquette Manor at 8140 N. Township Line Road, which is on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.



Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, October 6th, 2013

In the fourth chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians, St. Paul is describing what it means exactly to be a Christian, or specifically how a person changes (or should change) when they become a Christian.  As we go through this passage, we understand entirely that a man or woman, when they give themselves over to Christ, becomes a "new creation" and as a result will act differently and will have different reactions than previously.  He ends this passage as follows:  "Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice: and be ye kind one to another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you. "

Now it is certainly a challenge for all those who profess to be Christian to live their life in this world.  In one regard, we know that even when we give our life over to Christ, we realize that we are still imperfect, in other words, we are human and as such, we will still fail every now and then.  Secondarily, as human beings, we still have human feelings (such as anger, frustration, etc,) and sometimes these feelings will trip us up.  Thirdly, we always have to remember that despite the fact that we are Christians, and have given our lives to Our Blessed Saviour, we still live in the world.  And for a Christian, this would be the equivalent of continually walking through a mine field, never knowing what lies next in our path.

There is no way around the problems described above, but the key is to always stay close to Christ.  Always stay close to Our Blessed Saviour.  Know His Word . . .  Know His Commandments . . . Know Him.   A good rule of thumb is to always stay close to Our Blessed Saviour and His Cross.  And this way, you know that are close to His protection, His guidance, and His love.

Please join St. Margaret Anglican Church for Mass on Sunday, October 6th, 2013.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We have Mass at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, which is on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Join us as we gather to hear God's Word, Listen to the way in which Our Saviour speaks to each one of us, worship Him, and receive His Precious Body and Blood.  And after Mass, join us for our Coffee Hour.

Please visit our webpage at:
http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 29th, 2013 

 In the 22nd Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour posing the question, "what is the greatest commandment?" The response is certainly easy for us to respond back because we hear these words spoken each and every time we hear Mass: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself." The key here, and I think what actually makes putting this into practice so difficult, is the emphasis on "all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind." The main emphasis being on the word "all." This is indeed the tricky part. Now, we have to ask the question, do we give God our "all" in life or do we simply give Him a "piece" of our life every now and then? Now, I suppose it all boils down to how we define the word "all" but honestly do we always give God our "all" in life or is our life segmented into pieces? One piece goes to work. One piece goes to home. One piece goes to chores at home. One piece goes to running errands. One piece goes to church. One piece goes to relaxation.  One piece (on Sundays) goes to God. etc. etc. etc. All of us lead very busy lives and it is extremely easy . . . . entirely too easy, sadly . . . for us to be diverted in a thousand different directions with everything that we have to accomplish. Unfortunately, there is not a way around that. But there is a way that we can involve God in every aspect of our busy lives and in this way, He will become the center of our life. If we always make a point to involve God in our daily routine, our daily living, the important and the not-so-important aspects of our life, then ultimately we will love God "with all our heart, all our soul, all our mind." Go to your loving Saviour on a daily basis. Make Him a part of your life like never before. He has made you a part of His life since before you were born. You have been on His mind everyday of your life. Isn't about time that you have Him on your mind every day of your life?

 St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass each and every Sunday at 9:30 AM. We join together to celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis. Join us for Mass as we join together as God's Family listening to the Word of God found in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and then receive Him in Holy Communion so that He can nourish us physically and spiritually for the upcoming week. Afterwards, join us for treats at our Coffee Hour. Any questions about our church or where you can find us every Sunday morning, please visit our webpage at:

St. Margaret Webpage


Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 22, 2013

In both today's Epistle and Gospel, the emphasis seems to be on humility and being humble.  In the Epistle, we St. Paul urge us to walk "with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love."  And then in the 14th Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, Our Lord gives the parable about the man who takes it upon himself to sit in the highest place at the banquet and then is embarrassed when he is asked to move to a lower place.  Our Lord stated that we should therefore sit in the lower place and if need be we will be asked to move higher and not lower.  This is an important reminder for us in the time in which we live because everything seems to be focused on "me."  If we are inconvenienced, it is because it is an inconvenience to "me."  If we have to wait on something, we do not like this because it is not convenient to "me."  If I am told something that I do not want to hear, it is an insult to "me."  If someone has to wait, that is OK, because it is better for you to wait than for "me" to wait.  And the list goes on and on.  The emphasis seems to be on "me" in the culture in which we live.  

But Our Blessed Saviour emphasizes that we are called to humility and to service.  He, first and foremost, led by example when He washed the feet of the Apostles.  He certainly proved that He was humble when He carried His Cross and died on that same Cross in place of you and "me."  Let us never forget the example of Our Blessed Saviour.  Let us never forget that He leads first by example when He teaches us to forget about focusing on "me" and focusing on others.

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday, September 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we gather to celebrate Mass.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Saviour and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood for Holy Communion.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.



Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 15, 2013

In the Third Chapter of the Letter to the Ephesians, we hear the following snippet near the end of the reading:  " . . . .  according to the power that worketh in us . . . " (Ephesians 3:11 ff)  What exactly is the power that works inside of us?  Have you ever thought about it?  It is a very  . . . at least, seemingly . . .  . simple question.  But, then again, sometimes it is the simplest questions that are the most difficult at times.  You see, for everything that we do, there is a reason why we are doing it.  Again, this seems so simple that we don't even have to think about it.  But, then again, that is the whole point, isn't it?  It's so simple, we don't think about why or even how we are doing it.  Think about putting on a pair of socks.  Most of us don't even think about it . . .  we just do it.  Going to work . . .  we don't think about, we just do it.  But there has to be a reason why we do everything that we do, ultimately.  Of course, we should not go overboard with this exercise but then again it is important to think about things such as this every so often.  Why?  Because it helps us to appreciate not only why we do things but how we have accomplished the various events in our lives.  To put it simply, God is the power that worketh in us, as St. Paul puts it, and we should always recognize that fact.  Not only should we recognize it, we should acknowledge it by giving thanks to Our Heavenly Father on a daily basis.   Recognize the fact that God is in fact the power in your life.  He is the One that has created you.  He is the One that has given you life.  He is the One that has sustained you over the course of your life.  He is the One that has been with you even when you didn't recognize Him being there.  Acknowledge Him on a daily basis by giving your hear to Him.  

Join us on Sunday, September 15th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass for the 16th Sunday after Trinity.  St. Margaret Church celebrates Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Just go to 86th Street,  west of St Vincent Hospital and turn south on Township Line Road and Marquette Manor is on the west side of the street directly across from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Join us as we listen to Holy Scripture, hear the Word of God preached, and receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion.  A Coffee Hour follows Mass.

Our website can be found at:





A very easy way to support St. Margaret Church

Are you looking for an easy way to support St. Margaret?  It is very easy . . .  In fact, it is so easy that you do not even have to leave the comfort of your computer.  Just let other people know about St. Margaret's website or St. Margaret's FB page.  If you are already on FB, just forward the St. Margaret FB page link or share this post on your page.  This way, we let more people know about our church.  Also, you can forward our website link via email to your friends and family members to let them know about our website.  Such a simple way to let people know about our church.  Just invite them to visit:




Fifteenth Sunday After Trinity, Sunday, September 8th, 2013

In the Letter to the Galatians, St. Paul is speaking at length to the young church at Galatia in regards to the controversy stirred up over circumcision and whether or not circumcision itself is a necessary part of salvation.  St. Paul responds:  "But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world." (Galatians 6:11 ff)  Here, St. Paul emphasizes the Passion and Death of Our Beloved Saviour and this saving act is what has opened the way unto salvation and eternal life for humanity.  In dying on the Cross, Our Blessed Saviour has made Himself truly the Lamb of God; He has become the Sacrifice; He has borne our sins on that Blessed and Holy Cross.  And this is the point that St. Paul would rather have the church at Galatia to emphasize.  St. Paul  is emphasizing that it is the Death of Our Blessed Saviour that gives us life.  Elsewhere we read:  "Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body. For we which live are alway delivered unto death for Jesus' sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh"  (II Corinthians 4:10)  
It is in dying to the world, that we are brought to life in Christ.  Our Blessed Saviour's death on the Cross is the action that brings us life:  immortal life.  St. Paul is reminding the Galatians and us as well to never forget Christ's saving action from the Cross.  Remember always that Christ gave His life for you and for me.  Christ died in order that we might live.  

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church on Sunday September 8th, 2013 as we celebrate the 15th Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM and is followed by a Coffee Hour with delicious goodies and good company.  Come spend some quality time dedicating part of your Sunday to worship of God.  Begin the day and the week by giving part of it to God.  Hear His Word preached and receive Him in Holy Communion.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships each and every Sunday at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  This is located just south of 86th and Township Line Road and Marquette Manor is located across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  



Pastoral Letter from the ACA and the APA

Posting a link to this Pastoral Letter dated September 1st, 2013 concerning the ongoing cooperation between the Anglican Church in America (ACA) and the Anglican Province of America (APA) which is leading both jurisdictions on the path toward eventual unification.  This Pastoral Letter is signed by both Archbishop Grundorf (APA) and Archbishop Marsh (ACA).  In this letter you will find details pertaining to the ongoing reunification efforts of both the ACA and the APA, including the plans for the two jurisdictions to hold their national synods in 2014 at the same time in the same location.  

Here at St. Margaret, we are already experiencing the cooperation between the ACA and the APA.  Fr. Stephen Sommerock, who is  a priest of the APA is helping out at our parish, which of course is in the ACA.  
Please click on the following link to read the Pastoral Letter:




Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, September 1st, 2013

In the 17th Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear the story of the ten lepers who were healed by Our Blessed Saviour.  Ultimately, though, only one out of the ten that were healed took the time to come back and thank Our Blessed Saviour for what He had done.  Certainly, Our Lord took notice and we hear the following statement:  "Were there not ten cleansed? but where are the nine? There are not found that returned to give glory to God, save this stranger. And he said unto him, Arise, go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole." (St. Luke 17:11 ff)  Although, the point of this passage is gratitude and showing gratitude to God for all the blessings He has bestowed on us, there is this final statement by Our Lord that we should take notice of:  " . . . thy faith hath made thee whole."  

When we look around at the society around us, whether it be through our own experience, or what we see on television, or in the movies, or read in the newspaper, or see on the Internet, what is it that makes people "whole"?  In other words, this is another way of asking the question "what fulfills you?"  What fulfills you?  What makes you complete?  What brings you satisfaction?  If we look at commercials on television, it is merely a candy bar that satisfies a person.  But really if we look around, what makes a person "whole."  Is there something that brings "completeness" to a person?  Watching the news, unfortunately, you hear a lot about drugs and alcohol and stealing and robbery.  Many examples of people thinking that "items" will bring them happiness:  whether those items be ingested or possessed.  

We know as Christians, though, that only God can satisfy.  Only God can make us whole.  It is not owning the latest, most up-to-date item (whether it be a computer, or a TV, or shoes, etc) that makes us whole, it is the love of God that completes who we are as human beings.  Although it is certainly enjoyable to watch our favorite sports teams, for example, and it would certainly be nice for the teams that we follow win the championship, those events do not make us whole.  As Our Blessed Lord has pointed out:  ". .  . . thy faith has made thee whole!"  It is when we dedicate our life to God, it is when we make Him the center of our life, it is when we center our life around Our Heavenly Father, it is then that we are "whole."  As St. Augustine said:  "Our hearts were made for you, O Lord, and they are restless until they rest in you."   It is God who makes us complete.  It is He who makes us whole.  Let us spend our lives never forgetting that fact and spend our lives growing closer and closer to God.

Please join St. Margaret Church on Sunday, September 1st, 2013 as we celebrate the 14th Sunday after Trinity.  We worship at 9:30 AM in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins promptly at 9:30 AM and is followed by a Coffee Hour with all kinds of delicious goodies.  Join us for Mass where you can hear the Word of God preached, where you can dedicate yourself and your week to God, where you can spend quality time in reverent worship with your Brothers and Sisters in the Lord, and to receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion to nourish you and give you strength to carry on.



Fr. Stephen Sommerrock

On Sunday, August 25th, 2013, St. Margaret Anglican Church had the pleasure of hearing the sermon preached by the Rev'd Fr. Stephen Sommerrock.  Fr. Steve is a priest of the Anglican Province of America (APA), Diocese of Mid-America.  The APA Diocese of Mid-America is led by a dear friend of St. Margaret, Bishop Larry Shaver.  Bishop and Mrs. Shaver, from the Northern part of Indiana, when they are here in Indianapolis, have attended Mass at St. Margaret many times over the years and we love to see them when they are in town.   Both Bishop Shaver and our own Bishop Strawn have given permission for Fr. Stev to assist at St. Margaret's since there is an official agreement of Inter-Communion between the Anglican Church in America and the Anglican Province of America.  The fact that Fr. Steve worships with us and is now allowed to assist liturgically at our parish is just further concrete proof that the Inter-Communion between our two jurisdictions is very real.   

Fr. Sommerrock, along with his wife, Mrs. Aracelly Sommerrock, have been attending St. Margaret for the past few months.  Fr. Sommerrock is originally from New Jersey.   Fr. Steve has experience in various parishes around Central Indiana and has even said Mass in Costa Rica.  Fr. Steve has stated that he wants to help out at St. Margaret and we are very pleased to have such him with us.   It is a blessing for our parish that we have Fr. Steve with us and we wish him many years in his priestly ministry.



Let's Fill the Church on Sunday, September 15th, 2013!

Please visit the website of St. Margaret Anglican Church in order to find out about our parish and how you can visit us in person on Sunday morning.  

Also, don't forget that Sunday, September 15th, 2013 is National "Back to Church" Sunday.  If you do not currently have a church home,  . . . . if you do not currently worship on a regular basis with a church of your choice,  . .  . if you are looking for a church home . . .  then come visit us on Sunday, September 15th, 2013 . . . or any Sunday morning, for that matter . . . and "Come Home to Church!"  If you can visit us on that Sunday, that would be a wonderful thing because we want to have a chapel full that day.  We want the church to be packed with visitors and old friends alike because we want to give God the Glory!  You see, we feel that God deserves a "full house" that day.  And if you come and visit us, you will be helping to fulfill a dream of ours:  to have a full house for God!   Wouldn't be wonderful if on that particular Sunday a church full of people who took time out of their busy schedules and dedicated an hour of their life on a Sunday morning to worship God with their brothers and sisters!

Please visit our parish website at:
http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity

In the Tenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speaking to the Disciples:  "BLESSED are the eyes which see the things that ye see: for I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them." (St. Luke 10:23)  In life, it seems to be a human trait to take things for granted.  Whether it be our family members, our loved ones, our health, our jobs, etc, it seems that we take things for granted that we possess.  So, too, as Our Blessed Saviour points out, that we should always focus on the favours that God has bestowed on each one of us.  "Blessed are the eyes which see the things that you see . .  ."  Each one of us should make a point to sit down and make a list of all the blessings that God has bestowed upon us.  Human nature being what it is, it would be easier to come up with a list of things that are NOT right in our lives; things that we would want to change.  But make a point to think of all the things that God has done for you in your life that you realize.  Three things will happen:  1) It will make you aware of God working in your life; 2) It will more than likely help you to make note of other things that God has done for you which you never realized before; 3) Getting in the habit of thanking God for the blessings He has bestowed on you will help to get you out of the habit of focusing mainly on the negative things in your life.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for Mass on Sunday, August 25th, 2013 as we celebrate the Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity.  On this Sunday, Fr. Stephen Sommerrock will preach the sermon.  Also, please note that this Mass will be offered especially for all the persecuted Christians in Egypt who are suffering at this present time.  Let us all join together as God's family and offer up our support through prayer for our Christian Brothers and Sisters in Egypt.

Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, near 86th and Township Line Road.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM with a Coffee Hour to follow.



Saint Mary the Virgin

In the Epistle from the Mass of St. Mary the Virgin, we hear the following words from Isaiah the Prophet:  "I will greatly rejoice in the Lord, my soul shall be joyful in my God; for he hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, he hath covered me with the robe of righteousness,  . . ."  (Isaiah 61:7-11)  Without a doubt, we know that the Blessed Mother Mary was herself clothed with righteousness.  She was blessed by God, which was evidenced by the fact that God chose her to be the vessel in which His Son came into the world.  Of all the women in the world, God chose her to be the Mother of God.  It is interesting to note from various commentators that God could have chosen another woman but He did not.  Of course, the reason that He chose Mary is due to her righteousness, her purity of heart, her love, and her humility.  St. Mary certainly possessed these qualities but, more importantly, she was open to exercising these qualities in her life.  As such, she was recognized by God for her righteousness and chosen to be the Mother of God.  All of us have been given these qualities as well.  But it is up to us if we use them on a daily basis.  Owning something is not the same thing as using something.  I may own a hammer, for example, but I may never make use of it.  As a result, it just sets in the garage gathering dust.  Let us make use of the qualities that God has bestowed upon us:  righteousness; purity of heart; love; and humility.  In this way, we can imitate the Blessed Mother and bring Christ into the world through our actions.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, August 18, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate the Mass of St. Mary the Virgin.  We can be found every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, right across the street from St. Vincent's Women's Hospital.  Join us as we celebrate Mass; hear the Word of God; receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion; and take an hour out of the week to spend quality time with God in His honour and worship.  Afterwards, join us for our coffee hour where we have delicious goodies and spend time with one another as God's family.







Back to Church Sunday, September 15th, 2013



Sunday, September 15th, 2013 is National "Back to Church" Sunday.  St. Margaret Anglican Church is doing their part by inviting YOU to join us on Sunday, September 15th, 2013 for our Sunday morning Mass.  Join with us on that Sunday morning as we:

* Listen to the Word of God from the King James Version of Holy Scripture

* Hear the Word of God preached from the Bible

* Worship Our Heavenly Father in a traditional liturgy

* Join together as God's family with other brothers and sisters in the Lord

*  Receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Risen Saviour in Holy Communion.

We would like for you to worship with us on Sunday, September 15th, 2013.  If you do not currently have a church home or if you do not regularly attend church services on a weekly basis, consider joining St. Margaret Church on that Sunday to worship Our Heavenly Father.  By doing so, you will benefit a number of ways:

* You will spend quality time with God

* You will hear His Word

* You will assist St. Margaret Church in filling our church in honour of Our Blessed Saviour!

Consider joining us on Sunday, September 15th, 2013.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  From 86th Street, turn South on Township Line Road.  Marquette Manor is directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  

For more information about St. Margaret Anglican Church, please visit our website at:


Eleventh Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, August 11, 2013

To the young church at Corinth, St. Paul writes the following:  " . . . but I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me."  (1 Corinthians 15:1 ff)  St. Paul emphasizes what he did on behalf of God:  how much he preached; how much he laboured; how much he suffered; how hard he worked; how much pain he endured; etc.  And yet it was through God that he was able to accomplish everything he accomplished.  It is through Almighty God that each of us accomplishes what we accomplish in life.  It is through the goodness of Our Heavenly Father that we have everything that we possess:  our possessions; our skills; our homes; the food that we eat; the clothes on our back; our very lives are given to us by the Almighty.  As with most things, as human beings, we take things for granted.  But being a devout Christian means that we acknowledge God in everything:  both the good times and even the bad times.  If we do experience trials or tribulations, it is God Himself that gives us the strength to carry on.  Acknowledge God in all the blessings He has given you.  Acknowledge Him as your personal Saviour.  Make a commitment to Him Who first made a commitment to you on the Cross.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Join us for Mass as we gather as the Body of Christ to worship Our Risen Saviour and to receive Him in Holy Communion.  Receive the Lamb of God to strengthen you for the journey called "life" and hear His Word preached.  We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  

You can find us every Sunday morning at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM and is followed by a Coffee Hour with all kinds of delicious goodies.



Pictures of the Visit of Bishop and Mrs. Williams to St. Margaret Parish

On Sunday, August 4th, 2013 Bishop and Mrs. Williams visited St Margaret Parish.  Typically, it would be Bishop Stephen Strawn and Mrs. Strawn who would visit us but it turned out that Bishop Strawn was unable to make to trip and as a result Bishop Williams was able to step in and cover for Bishop Strawn.  This proved to be fortunate for St. Margaret because while we certainly all look forward to the visit from Bishop Strawn every year, it provided us the opportunity to meet Bishop Williams, who had never visited us before.  Bishop Williams is the retired Bishop Ordinary of the Diocese of the West but for the past year and a half has resided in Wisconsin, which is part of the Diocese of the Missouri Valley, of which St. Margaret is a member of.    Bishop Williams celebrated Mass and preached.  After Mass, Bishop Williams met with the parishoners at the coffee hour and spoke about the church in general and various happenings within the ACA.   Here are some pictures of the visit:





Above and Below:  Bishop Williams addressing the parish during the Coffee Hour.


Below:  Mrs. Margaret Simpson, Head of the St. Margaret Altar Guild, along with Mrs. Joy Williams


Below:  Fr. Todd Bragg posing for a picture along with Mrs Joy Williams and Bishop Williams


Below:  Mrs Joy Williams and Bishop Daren Williams



Bishop Daren Williams to visit St. Margaret Parish

On Sunday, August 4th, 2013 Bishop Daren Williams will make a visit to St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church.  Bishop Williams is the retired bishop of the Diocese of the West (ACA) but currently resides in Wisconsin.  Normally, Bishop Stephen Strawn travels to Indianapolis for his annual visit but this year we are very pleased to have Bishop Williams visit us.  As this will be his first visit, the members of St. Margaret Anglican Church are very anxious to meet Bishop and Mrs. Williams.  

Please make plans to join us for Mass.  Bishop Williams will celebrate Mass and preach as well.  Afterwards, we will have an opportunity to meet and spend time with Bishop and Mrs. Williams at the Coffee Hour after Mass.  Let us welcome Bishop Williams and enjoy his time with us.  Certainly, it is not everyday that we get to celebrate Mass with a bishop so let us thank Our Blessed Saviour for this opportunity!


St. Margaret of Scotland, pray for us!

Tenth Sunday after Trinity, August 4th, 2013

In the Twelfth chapter of the First Letter to the Corinthians, we hear the following:  "Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. And there are differences of administrations, but the same Lord. And there are diversities of operations, but it is the same God which worketh all in all. But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal." (1 Corinthians 12:1 ff)  As this passage points out, there are diverse gifts, talents and ministries that each of us are called to us and put to use in our own special way.  Some people are talented at cooking, some have the skills of a handyman, some are smart when it comes to math, etc.  The one who is skilled at carpentry may not have the know-how to boil water when it comes to the kitchen, for example.  So, too, for Christians, there are a diverse array of skills and talents that each of us have been endowed with.  These talents are bestowed upon us by God and we are called to use the gifts accordingly.  No matter what the gift is, we are reminded that it is the same Spirit and the same God that works through all of these gifts.  Today's reading is a good reminder that there are diverse talents and diverse skills but they all have the same source:  God.  

So, too, we should remind ourselves that there are different levels of spirituality and different ways of finding God.  As St. Paul spoke in the passage above:  "But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal."  The point being is that we should not judge this person or that person because they do not practice their faith in exactly the same way that we do.  Different people reflect their faith in different ways.  Different people have different emotions, different reactions, different ways of practicing their faith, etc.  But the bottom line is that God is the source of all that we have and all that we possess.  Our Lord said:  "I am the way, the truth, and the life.  No man cometh unto the Father, but by Me."  (St. John 14:6)  There is only one way and that is Jesus.  He is our Way.  

Come join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, August 4th, 2013 at 9:30 AM as we celebrate Mass with Bishop Daren Williams.  Bishop Williams will celebrate Mass and preach on this Sunday.  Afterwards, we will meet with Bishop and Mrs. Daren Williams in our coffee hour.  

St. Margaret Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  




Ninth Sunday after Trinity, July 28, 2013

In the story that has come to be best known as the "Prodigal Son," Our Blessed Lord tells the story of the son who wanted to have things his own way and he wanted to enjoy his father's inheritance even before the father had died!  But, to make a long story short, after a while the son realized that "living life in the fast lane" really was not what he thought it would be like and he came to his senses.  St. Luke describes the thoughts of the son when he came to this realization:  "I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants."  

First and foremost, it is us who have to first realize that we are in need of God and also that we are ready to seek God.  So often in our life, we may very well acknowledge that there is a problem but we may still ignore the problem and refuse to do anything about it.  In that sense, the key is not recognizing that there is a problem.  That is certainly the start.  The real key is to recognize that there is a problem and then do something about it.  This is what the son did.  He recognized that he had made a mistake and he chose to remedy the problem by going back to his father in humility and to ask for forgiveness.  

The most wonderful part of the parable is yet to come, though.  Our Blessed Lord continues the parable by telling what happens next:  "And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him."  

This is how it is for us when we come to God.  It is God Who reaches out to us.  It is God Who searches for us.  It is God Who goes over and beyond for us.  Recognizing that we have a problem is only part of the solution.  The other half is once we realize that we have a problem, is to seek out the cure.  And for us, that is to seek God, to make Him a part of our life on a daily basis!

Join St. Margaret Church for Mass as we celebrate the Ninth Sunday after Trinity on Sunday, July 28, 2013.  St. Margaret worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, near 86th Street and Township Line Road.  Join us as we worship Our Blessed Lord and receive Him in Holy Communion.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM with a coffee hour to follow.

Please visit our website at:




Eighth Sunday after Trinity, July 21, 2013

In the Eighth Chapter of the Letter to the Romans, we hear the following:  "The Spirit himself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together."  This passage is a powerful reminder that the Holy Ghost Himself is our Witness that we are the children of God.  And, as children, we are "joint-heirs with Christ."  But it is pointed that out that we are joint-heirs in both the glory but also the suffering.  We must always remember that we are not exempt from suffering simply because we are a child of God.  Our Blessed Lord was not exempt from suffering . . .  His Blessed Mother was not exempt from suffering . . .  the saints in Heaven were not exempt from suffering while they were here on earth.  None of us is exempt from suffering.  What we are called to do, just like Our Blessed Lord did, is to embrace our Cross and to endure the suffering.  Sort of like riding out the storm together with Our Blessed Saviour.  The point is that as Christians we are called to offer up our victories and also to offer up our sorrows as well.  Whether we are in the valley or up on the mountain-top, the key is to always keep close to Our Blessed Lord.  Make Him a part of every day of your life.  Some people only run to God when they are in trouble.  These people see God as their "last resort."  Please do not run to God only in times or trouble or only when all other avenues are exhausted!  Run to Him on a daily basis . . . in both good times and bad  . . .  . keep close to Him and He will keep close to you!

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for worship on Sunday, July 21st, 2013 as we celebrate the Eighth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God found in both the King James Version of the Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we join together as God's family to worship Him and to spend quality time with Him in traditional worship and to receive Him in His Most Blessed Body and Blood!  After Mass, join us for Coffee Hour where we can enjoy friendship and goodies.

To find out more about St. Margaret Anglican Church, please visit our webpage:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Seventh Sunday after Trinity, July 14, 2013



The Collect for the beginning of Mass for the Seventh Sunday after Trinity goes as follows:  "LORD of all power and might, who art the author and giver of all good things; Graft in our hearts the love of thy Name, increase in us true religion, nourish us with all goodness, and of thy great mercy keep us in the same; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. "  As we hear in the Collect, we are asking the Lord to graft in our hearts the love of Thy Holy Name.  The Holy Name of Jesus is indeed a name that we should always cherish in our hearts.  St. Matthew reminds us:  "And she shall call His Name Jesus: for He shall save His people from their sins."  (St. Matthew 1:21)  Indeed, in its' origin, this name means "God is our help" or "saviour."  Indeed, Jesus is our help.  He is most certainly Our Saviour.  We should keep His Name always on our lips and in our hearts.  "At the Name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those in heaven and on earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father Jesus Christ is Lord!" (Phil 2:10-11)


 So often, we take this Blessed Name for granted.  So often, in movies and television, we hear this Precious Name mentioned but it is not in the context of prayer or praise.  Rather, it is uttered with the utmost form of disrespect.  Sadly, the custom of bowing one's head at the hearing of the Holy Name of Jesus has gone out of style in so many of the churches.  But in our Anglican church, we still bow our head when we hear the Name Jesus.  "Graft in our hearts the love of Thy Name . . . . "

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, July 14th, 2013.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  Hear the Word of God preached; listen to His Word from the King James Bible; we use the 1928 Book of Common prayer and the Anglican Missal; receive Our Blessed Lord in Holy Communion; and join us for delicious goodies in our Coffee Hour following Mass.


Sixth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, July 7th, 2013

In the Fifth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel, we hear an interaction between Our Blessed Saviour and the Disciples on the general topic of being angry at people or, in general, holding on to grudges against people that have done wrong to us.  We hear the following:  "Therefore if thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath ought against thee; leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift. " (St. Matthew 5:20 ff)  Let's be honest, this is one of the most difficult things that we are called to do as Christians.  In theory, it might be easy but in actual practice, it is downright difficult, to say the least.  But we know that Our Blessed Lord means what He says.  He is not someone who beats around the bush.  If we read through the Gospels, we see that He usually gets right to the point and does not mince words.  If you look at the Lord's Prayer, for example, you will see that there are qualifications for forgiving that if you do not pay attention, you might miss the point entirely.  Say the "Our Father," . . . . remember the part when we get to " . . .  forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who have trespassed against us . . . . "  There is one tiny word in the middle of that sentence that proves to be ever so important:  "as."  In other words, when you think about it you are asking God to forgive us our wrongs as we forgive those who have wronged us!  How can we expect God to forgive us if we do not find it in our heart to forgive others.  Is this an easy thing to do?  Sometimes it is and sometimes it seems downright impossible.  But remember that God offers His salvation to all and died on the Cross for all.  It is up to each one of us to accept or reject that offer of salvation.

Come join St. Margaret Anglican Church for Mass on Sunday, July 7th, 2013 at 9:30 AM.  We worship at the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM with a coffee hour which follows.  Join us for traditional worship where we worship God together as a family; listen to His Word in the King James Version of the Bible; use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer; and receive Him in Holy Communion to strengthen and nourish us.



Open up the Door of your Heart to the One that Loves you so much!

Read Fr. Todd's observation on a very famous portrait and exactly what the implications are for each one of us!  Please visit Fr. Todd's Sermons Blog at the following link:




Fifth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday, June 30, 2013

In the Fifth Chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke, we hear the following conversation between Our Lord and St. Peter:  "Now when he had left speaking, he said unto Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught. And Simon answering said unto him, Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net." (St. Luke 5:1ff)  I think it would be fair to say that human beings just have to know how something works.  Whether it be a household item or gadget or a medical procedure or even a basic idea of how to do something better.  As human beings we just need to grab onto the concept and have to understand in our minds.  Faith is not so much about "understanding" or "knowing" as much as it is about "trusting."  In today's Gospel, St. Peter acknowledges by his words that he thinks letting out the nets one more time will be a waste of time, but nonetheless he does it anyway at the Lord's request.  Faith is trusting even if we do not have understanding.  Faith is having confidence to move forward even if we are scared.  Faith is knowing Who to trust no matter  what lays ahead of us.  This is the lesson that St. Peter teaches today to all of us: to trust Our Blessed Saviour even if we do not understand.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, June 30, 2013 at 9:30 AM for our Sunday Mass.  Hear the King James Scriptures; use the 1928 Book of Common prayer; enjoy traditional worship with good old fashioned Scripture-based sermons; and enjoy the warmth and love that our parish shares as a family. And, first and foremost, worship Our Heavenly Father and receive Holy Communion to nourish you in your journey for the coming week.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM with a coffee hour to follow.  

St. Margaret Parish worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, located near St. Vincent Hospital.  Please visit our website at:




Fr. Bragg with Bishop Larry Shaver

After Mass at St. Margaret on Sunday, June 23, 2013, Fr. Todd and Frances Bragg went back to Greenfield to say hello to Bishop Larry Shaver and Mrs. Carol Shaver after the Mass at the Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit.  Bishop Shaver was in Greenfield to say the Mass and do confirmations.  Bishop and Mrs Shaver have been welcome guests at St. Margaret parish many times over the years and they are always welcome at our parish.


Above:  His Grace, The Rt. Rev. Larry Shaver along with Fr. Todd Bragg

Below:  Bishop Shaver along with Mrs. Carol Shaver



Parish Pitch-In Supper 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church held a pitch-in supper at Marquette Manor on Saturday, June 22nd, 2013.  Click on the following link to see pictures of our wonderful evening:



Fourth Sunday after Trinity, Sunday June 23, 2013

In the Epistle for this Sunday, the Apostle reminds in in the letter to the Romans:  "I RECKON that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us."  (Romans 8:18ff)  I suppose that it is human nature to dwell on the negative.  Just look at the nightly news or read the daily newspaper, you will see the first twenty minutes of the newscast or the first twenty pages of the paper before you will get to a "positive" story.  So, too, in our own lives we often dwell on the negative things in life such as overwhelming debts and bills . . . . jobs that seem to get more difficult  . . . .  health issues . . . . the list goes on and on.  And, yet, we are reminded that everything that causes us pain and suffering in this life are nothing compared to what we will enjoy in the life to come.  What is that difference?  What is the difference between our earthly life here and now and the life that each of us has the opportunity to enjoy in Heaven????  God is the difference.  In Heaven, we will be in the presence of God and will enjoy eternal happiness as a result.  So, the lesson to this story is to always keep God close.  Always keep God close to you even in your worse trials.  Keep close to God on a daily basis and make Him your best friend.  And then you will be sure that you will never be alone even when you face the ills of the world.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Church for Mass on Sunday, June 23, 2013 as we celebrate the Fourth Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, just around the corner from St. Vincent Hospital and directly across the street from the St Vincent Women's Hospital.  After Mass, we have a very nice Coffee Hour where delicious goodies are served.  

Please visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Third Sunday after Trinity, Sunday June 16, 2013

In the Epistle for the Third Sunday after Trinity (I St. Peter 5:5 ff), we hear the following: "Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour . . . " We are reminded by St. Peter that we are to be always aware that we are in real danger from attacks from the devil. The devil wants nothing more than to confound our relationship with God. He does all he can to place barriers in our way to block our movement toward God: distractions, evil thoughts, feelings of unworthiness, feelings of not being able to succeed, etc. All of these things just mentioned find their basis in the works of the devil to prohibit us from developing our relationship with God to the fullest. Thus, St. Peter reminds us to always be vigilant against these traps in order to develop our relationship with God to the fullest.

On Sunday, June 16, 2013, please join St. Margaret Anglican Church for Mass. Mass starts at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning. Immediately following Mass, we have a coffee hour with all kinds of delicious foods and goodies. You can find us in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.

You can find out more information by visiting our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Visit to Bishop Mote's Grave



On Thursday, June 13th, 2013 Frances and Fr. Todd Bragg made a visit to Bishop Mote's grave on the far-East Side of Indianapolis.  It was a beautiful day for a visit.  Unfortunately, it had been a long time since Fr. Todd was able to go and pay his respects but everything worked out just fine to go visit on such a beautiful day.  It took a while to find the marker but when we did, we were so excited and so happy.  Posting some pictures of our visit to visit Bishop Mote.  I think of Bishop Mote all the time because he truly was one of the finest priests I ever knew.  A humble man to the end, always ready to serve others, and I never knew him to think of himself as better than anyone else.  We all loved Bishop Mote very much and still miss him to this day.






If you will notice from these pictures, and especially if you look at the marker itself, you will notice that it does not say "Bishop" on the marker.  It just states "Anglican Catholic" and it does not state anything about him being a bishop.  I do not know if this was his decision or the family's decision to leave out "bishop" from his marker, but all I know is, it fits the good bishop to a "t."  It certainly does fit his character that it does not state "bishop" anywhere on the marker. A humble man to the end, without a doubt.  


For more information about Bishop Mote, please visit:


Second Sunday after Trinity, June 9th, 2013

In the epistle for the Second Sunday after Trinity, we hear the following:  "Hereby perceive we the love of God, because he laid down his life for us: and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. " (I St. John 3:11 ff)  The Almighty Creator of the Universe had no need to lay down His life for us.  He created the universe, He created the world, He created Humanity, He created you and I . . . . and He, quite simply, could have left it at that.  He could have created the world and then left it alone.  But He chose to take it a step further.  He decided to become "a man like us in all things but sin" in order to share our humanity.  He wanted to share our humanity so that we could share His eternal life.  Thus, the meaning is clear that our God makes a point to be involved in our life.  And, yet, it is still up to us to make the choice; to accept His invitation; to accept the free gift of Salvation; and to turn our lives over to God.

Please join St. Margaret Anglican Church as we celebrate the Mass of the Second Sunday after Trinity on Sunday, June 9th, 2013.  Mass is celebrated in the chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM with a coffee hour to follow.

Visit our website at:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/ 



First Sunday after Trinity, June 2nd, 2013

In the Sixteenth Chapter of St. Luke's Gospel, Our Blessed Lord relates the story of Lazarus and the Rich Man.  In this story, Our Saviour contrasts the difference between how these two men lived their lives:  the rich man wore fine clothing and ate  delicious foods while Lazarus was a poor beggar who lived a miserable existence.  We are further told that when both men died, Lazarus went to Heaven and the rich man went to hell.  In fact, the rich man suffered so much in hell that he cried out to Abraham to send Lazarus to him to give him even the slightest bit of relief to his torment and we then hear the following:  "But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things . . . ."

This Gospel passage points out the problem faced by so many in our society today.  So many of us are fixated on the good things in life.  We have everything we want:  the latest gadget; the newest car; a house in the fanciest neighborhood; the latest fashions; etc.  Now, there is nothing wrong with any of these things just mentioned, but when they take our attention away from God, that is where the problem arises.  We are called as Christians to keep our attention fixed on God.  It is God Who provides all the blessings in life but if these "blessings" divert the attention away from Him, what use are they in the long run?  Fashionable clothes go out of style . . . the latest electronics become obsolete . . .   cars break down . . .  but the one thing they never goes bad is the love of God.  Keep your eyes focused on God.  Keep your attention on your Heavenly Father.  

Join St Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for Mass on Sunday, June 2nd, 2013 as we celebrate the First Sunday after Trinity.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  You can find us at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis, Indiana.

 Join us for beautiful hymns, traditional worship, 1928 Book of Common Prayer, King James Bible, and down to earth Bible preaching!



St. Margaret Parish Supper

On Saturday, June 22, 2013, at 5:00 PM, St. Margaret Parish will hold a supper for the members and family members.  It will take place in Marquette Manor, up on the Fifth Floor Card Room.  As has been the case in past years, this is certainly a fun time with lots of delicious food.  A sign-up sheet will be available to sign-up to bring a food item of your choice if you have not already done so.  Mark your calendars for Saturday, June 22, 2013 and we will look forward to a very fun evening.


Trinity Sunday, May 26th, 2013

On Sunday, May 26th, 2013 St. Margaret Anglican Church will be celebrate "Trinity Sunday" in honour of the Holy Trinity: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.  As human beings, we learn to do things and we do certain things so frequently and so often that we never really have to think about actually doing them, we just go ahead and do them.  Putting on a pair of socks, for example.  We don't really don't put much thought into doing these things because we have done them so often, we don't have to think about doing them.  So, too, in our religious life, unfortunately, some things become a matter of routine, we just do them because we have done them for years.  Making the Sign of the Cross immediately comes to mind:  "In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost . . . . ."  Whenever we begin our prayers, whenever we begin our Grace before meals, whenever we begin Mass, the list goes on and on in regards to when we make the Sign of the Cross.  How often we say these words and as a result we may tend to gloss over the importance of the words we are speaking at the time:  "In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost .. . . ."

In the Third chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speaking to Nicodemus:  "Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God."   We are called to be born again in our hearts, in our souls, in our lives as Christians.  We are called to be new creatures born anew through the Sacrifice of Our Blessed Lord upon the Cross.  We are called to dedicate our life to the One Who dedicated His life to us.  

Join us on Sunday, May 26th, 2013 for Mass.  Listen to God's Word.  Listen to God speaking to you directly through the sermon.  Spend time in quiet reflection and worship in union with other members of the Body of Christ.  And, finally, receive Our Blessed Lord in His Precious Body and Blood in order to nourish you for your journey of life.

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass each Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, at 8140 N. Township Line Road.  Coffee Hour immediately follows Mass.



Feel Free to Join Us for Mass on Sunday Morning

Please feel free to join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church for Mass.  Every Sunday morning, St. Margaret celebrates Mass at 9:30 AM.  Mass is celebrated in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis. 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is a member parish of the Anglican Church in America / Traditional Anglican Communion.  St. Margaret is a traditional Anglican parish which still uses the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the Anglican Missal.  We believe in the True Presence of Our Lord Truly Present in the Body and Blood at Communion Time.  We know that Our Blessed Lord nourishes us for our journey of life through feeing us of His own Precious Body and Blood.  We believe that God speaks to us through Holy Scripture.  We use the King James version of the Bible.  Although our liturgy is traditional and formal, we are a very warm and loving congregation.  After Mass, we gather together for a Coffee Hour and enjoy each other's company while enjoying delicious goodies. 

Please take some time out of your busy schedule on Sunday to spend time with God and with His family.  Nourish your soul through listening to God's Word and receiving Him in Holy Communion.  St. Margaret Church . . . a traditional church for a new generation!


Whitsunday (Pentecost), Sunday, May 19, 2013

In the Fourteenth Chapter of the Gospel of St. John, we hear Our Blessed Saviour addressing the Apostles:

"If a man love Me, he will keep My words; and My Father will love him, and We will come unto him, and make Our abode with him. He that loveth Me not keepeth not My sayings: and the word which ye hear is not Mine, but the Father's which sent me. These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my Name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you."  

Our Lord is very direct in what He says to the Apostles.  And some two-thousand years later, He is just as direct to each one of us that follow Him:  If you "love Me, you will keep My words . . . ."  Knowing what to do is not always easy.  Sometime we do the wrong thing strictly out of ignorance because we do not know any better.  At other times we do the wrong thing out of habit.  Still other times, we do the wrong thing willfully because it is easier to do the wrong thing instead of the right thing.  But, Our Lord commanded us to follow Him in everything we do.  He taught His disciples by both Word and Example and, as such, through the Scriptures, we learn from Him as well.  In any task that we can think of, we need to be taught in order to do that task correctly.  Whether it be a simple chore around the house or something more difficult.  We need instruction in order to first learn how to do things the right way.  We need to be instructed.  This is where the Holy Ghost comes in.  Our Lord continues:  "But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my Name, he shall teach you all things . .. "  

Let us ask the Holy Ghost to come into our lives in a special way.  Let us ask the Holy Ghost to abide in our hearts so that each of us can become a living, breathing temple of God.  Let us enlist the aid of the Holy Ghost so that He can continue to teach us right from wrong and aid us in making correct choices in our lives.  And, finally, let us ask the Holy Ghost to allow us to become the instrument of God that God would have us to be in this world.  Let us be His face to those around us so that we can be the presence of God to a world much in need of the almighty.

Mass is celebrated every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Join St. Margaret so that you can spend part of your Sunday morning worshiping God, hearing the Word of God in the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood.   For more information, please visit our website:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com



Sunday After Ascension, Sunday, May 12, 2013

In the Fourth Chapter of the First Epistle of St. Peter, we hear the following:  "As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another . . ."  Certainly, as Christians, we can only give to others what has first been given to us.  St. Peter reminds us to share with those around us the gifts that God has bestowed upon us.  In other words, share the gift that God has given to you.  Each of us in the Church has a unique talent and gift that only we can share.  Any talent or any gift that has been given to you is meant to be shared, to be used.  Use the gift that God has given to you to bless others around you!

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, May 12, 2013 as we celebrate the Sunday after Ascension.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  

Mass begins at 9:30 AM and there is a Coffee Hour which follows which has all kinds of delicious food and where we meet and enjoy good company.  Please consider joining us so that we can worship Our Blessed Saviour together and also receive His Most Precious Body and Blood to be nourished for the journey we call life.  

More information about St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Parish can be found at the parish website:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/



Fifth Sunday After Easter (Rogation Sunday), Sunday, May 5, 2013


St. James tells us the following:  "Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves."  (St. James 1.22–27)  As Christians, we are called to live out our faith on a daily basis and not merely talk about it.  Walk the walk and not talk the talk, in other words.  This is probably the hardest thing about being a faithful Christian, in other words, to be a real Christian in everything that we do, in the ways in which we treat those around us, in how we react to negative attitudes of those we encounter, etc.  It is not easy to always "turn the other cheek," and yet this is what Our Blessed Saviour teaches us not only by His words, but by His ACTIONS.  In that sense, Christians are called to be "People of Action" and not "People of Words."  It is nice to talk about our faith, but if our actions are the opposite, people around us will realize that our words don't mean much to begin with.

Join us on Sunday, May 5th, 2013, as we celebrate the Fifth Sunday after Easter (Rogation Sunday).  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  Just us for Mass as we hear the Word of God; Listen as God speaks to each of us; Receive Our Precious Lord in Holy Communion; and join together as God's Family.  

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis.  

Please see our website for more details and directions how to find us:

http://indyanglican.blogspot.com/




Fourth Sunday After Easter, Sunday, April 28, 2013

In the Gospel for today, taken from the 16th Chapter of the Gospel of  St. John, we hear Our Blessed Saviour speaking of the coming of the Holy Ghost:

"Howbeit when He, the Spirit of truth, is come, He will guide you into all truth: for He shall not speak of Himself; but whatsoever He shall hear, that shall He speak: and he will shew you things to come.  He shall glorify Me: for he shall receive of Mine, and shall shew it unto you."

Join us for Mass as we reflect on Our Blessed Saviour's words.  Join us as we pray for the coming of the Holy Ghost into our lives.  Join us as we ask for the Holy Ghost to guide us in our daily lives, to help us in how we lead our daily lives.  The life of a dedicated Christian is one that is changed.  It is not perfect, but our faith journey is a life long effort.  Each Sunday we join one another to attend Mass, we hear the Word of God, we reflect on what He has to say to us in a personal way, we worship Him in a respectful, reverent way, and we receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood!

Join us this Sunday.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, located on the Northwest Side of Indianapolis, near 86th and Township Line Road.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  After Mass, we have a Coffee Hour, where we share fellowship along with delicious goodies.  



Third Sunday After Easter, Sunday, April 21, 2013

We need YOU!!!!!  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is searching for members who would be interested in joining us for Mass on Sunday mornings.   If you are looking for a church home.  If you are looking for a loving church family.  If you are looking for a place where you can hear the Word of God preached.  If you are looking for a church that uses the King James Bible and the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  If you are looking for a church where you can receive Our Blessed Saviour in His Body and Blood, St. Margaret is the place for YOU!

St. Margaret Parish is a traditional church that is rich in spirit and rich in love.  We are seeking members who are dedicated to serving Our Blessed Lord and who are seeking to have God make a difference in their life.   We hold Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please feel free to join us as we worship Our Risen Saviour , listen to His Sacred Word, and receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood!



Second Sunday After Easter, Sunday, April 14, 2013

Come join us for Mass on Sunday, April 14, 2013 as we celebrate the Second Sunday after Easter. From the Tenth Chapter of St. John's Gospel, we hear the following: 

"I am the good shepherd; and know my sheep, and am known of mine, even as the Father knoweth me, and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep."

Our Blessed Lord is indeed the Good Shepherd. He knows each one of us and He watches over us. He does not watch over us out of obligation, nor out of duty, but He watches over us because He loves us. In turn, we are called to respond to Him, not out of obligation, nor out of duty, but rather because we love Him. He did lay down His life for His sheep by dying on the Cross and offering each one of us the opportunity to escape the bondage of sin and death and to join Him for all of eternity.

Join St. Margaret Anglican Church for Mass. We meet at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, just across the street from the St. Vincent's Women's Hospital. Mass begins at 9:30 AM and we have a Coffee Hour afterward where all are invited to share in some delicious goodies.




First Sunday After Easter, Sunday, April 7, 2013

In the Fifth Chapter of the First Epistle of St. John, we hear the following:  "For there are three that bear witness, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one. If we receive the witness of men, the witness of God is greater: for this is the witness of God which he hath testified of his Son."  We know that being a witness only comes from observing, seeing, experiencing.  To be a witness, we have to have first-hand knowledge.  What kind of witnesses are we when it comes to God?  

Please join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church as we worship Our Risen Lord.  Join us as we receive  Him in His Precious Body and Blood at Communion.  Hear His Sacred Word as we listen to words of Scripture.  St. Margaret worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwestside of Indianapolis.  Marquette Manor is directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Coffee Hour is served directly after Mass and everyone is invited.



NOTE:  Mass to be held in the Chapel on Sunday, April 7, 2013

Please note that on Sunday, April 7, 2013, St. Margaret will hold Mass, as usual, in the Chapel at Marquette Manor.  As previously announced by Fr. Bragg, we had expected that we would have to hold Mass in the Foundation Hall this coming Sunday but it turns out that we will be able to hold Mass, as we usually do, in the Chapel at Marquette Manor.  Mass will begin at 9:30 AM on Sunday



Easter Sunday Celebration 2013

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church held a beautiful Easter Mass today, March 31, 2013.  We were unable to hold Mass in the Chapel as we usually do on most Sundays, we held Mass on the Fourth Floor of Marquette Manor.  We are so grateful that we were allowed to hold Mass even though not in the chapel.  The altar was set up beautifully and we had a very good crowd.  God has been so good to our parish and we are so grateful to Marquette Manor, who allows us to hold Mass there.  Actually, we also had a beautiful Holy Saturday service as well yesterday where we prayed the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.  Very good attendance on Saturday and Sunday as well.  Sharing some pictures of the Altar for 2013 Easter Sunday.




Easter Sunday, March 31, 2013

From the Third Chapter of the Letter to the Colossians, we hear the following:  "If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth."  The Disciples saw the Empty Tomb on the first Easter Morn, and they believed.  As a result, their lives were changed completely.  The same way for dedicated Christians 2,000 years after that first Easter Morn.  We have seen the Risen Saviour.  We see Him on a daily basis, if we just take the time to search for Him.  

Please join us on Sunday, March 31, 2013 as we celebrate Our Risen Lord.  Give some of your time this day to worship God and to hear His Word and receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament. Please Note that on Easter, we will not be using the Chapel but will celebrate Mass on the Fourth Floor.    St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis.  



Schedule for Holy Saturday, March 30, 2013

On Holy Saturday, March 30, 2013, we will hold a special service constisting of Rosary and Stations of the Cross.  Our special service remembering Our Blessed Lord's Sacrifice will begin at 10:00 AM.  Please join us as we pray the Sorrowful Mysteries of Our Lady's Rosary.  Afterward, we will accompany Our Lord in His carrying of the Cross as we pray the Stations of the Cross. 

Prior to our special service, Confessions will be heard from 9:15 to 9:55 AM. 

Services will be held in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwestside of Indianapolis. 



Good Friday, 2013

Remember that Our Blessed Saviour chose to die on the Cross for our sins.  He committed no wrong, did no evil, wronged no-one . . . and yet He chose to take our place.  Where it should have been you and I paying the price for our sins, He stepped in and replaced us.  Never forget the Sacrifice that Our Blessed Lord had made on our behalf



Palm Sunday, March 24, 2013

Please feel free to join us for Palm Sunday on Sunday, March 24, 2013.  Join our procession on that day as we accompany Our Blessed Lord on His wonderful entry into Jerusalem saying "Hosanna!  Blessed is he who comes in the Name of the Lord!"  We will also hear the crowds yell for His crucifixion:  "Let Him be crucified!"  Join us as we witness Pilate wash his hands, hoping to relieve himself of all responsibility.  

Join us as we hear God's Word from the King James Version of the Bible and from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  Join us as we hear the Word of God preached, urging each of us to a more personal relationship with Our Lord and Saviour.  Join us as we receive the Precious Body and Blood in Holy Communion as Our Saviour nourishes us with His own Body and Blood.

Join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church in celebrating Palm Sunday.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM and is held in the Chapel at Marquette Manor located on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, directly across from St. Vincent's Women's Hospital at 8140 N. Township Line Road.  Coffee Hour follows directly after Mass where we meet as God's Family and share refreshments and fellowship with one another.  



Join us for Palm Sunday Mass on Sunday, March 24, 2013

On Sunday, March 24, 2013, St. Margaret Anglican Church will celebrate our Palm Sunday Mass.  Join us as we remember Our Bless Saviour's Triumphant Entry into Jerusalem. 

St. John 12:13
They took palm branches and went out to meet him, shouting, "Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessed is the King of Israel!"

Join us as we accompany Our Saviour in rememberance of the beginning of Holy Week as Our Lord is cheered as He enters Jerusalem but then days later is demanded to be crucified by many of the same people:  "Crucify Him, Crucify Him!"




St. Joseph Day, March 19, 2013

Here is a beautiful prayer on St. Joseph's Day:

"Oh, St. Joseph, whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the throne of God. I place in you all my interests and desires. Oh, St. Joseph, do assist me by your powerful intercession, and obtain for me from your devine Son all spiritual blessings, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. So that, having engaged here below your heavenly power, I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most loving of Fathers.
Oh, St. Joseph, I never weary of contemplating you, and Jesus asleep in your arms; I dare not approach while He reposes near your heart. Press Him in my name and kiss His fine head for me and ask him to return the Kiss when I draw my dying breath. St. Joseph, Patron of departing souls - Pray for me. "



Upcoming Schedule for Holy Week Services

Please note the upcoming schedule for Holy Week services for St. Margaret Anglican Church. 
Palm Sunday Mass, along with distribution of the  palms,  will be celebrated in the Chapel at Marquette Manor on Sunday, March 24th, 2013 at 9:30 AM. 

On Saturday, March 30th, 2013, St. Margaret will hold a special Holy Saturday service consisting of Rosary followed by Stations of the Cross.  This service will be held in the Chapel at Marquette Manor.  This service will begin at 10:00 AM.  Confessions will be heard prior to the service from 9:15 AM until 9:55 AM.

On Sunday, March 31, Easter Sunday, Mass will be celebrated at Marquette Manor but we will hold Mass on the Fourth Floor of Marquette Manor instead of the Chapel.  Mass will begin at 9:30 AM as usual.  Also, Coffee Hour, following Mass, will be held in the same location as usual.  The only difference is that we will celebrate Mass in the "Upper Room" on Easter Sunday instead of the Chapel. 

You can keep up with all the latest news concerning St. Margaret Church by visiting our website at:



Passion Sunday Mass, Sunday, March 17th, 2013

In the Letter to the Hebrews, we are reminded of Our Blessed Saviour's Sacrifice for each one of us.  He sacrificed His Own Blood to pay the ultimate sacrifice:  " . . . but by His own blood He entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us."  Lent is a time of sacrifice in order to remember the Sacrifice that Our Lord made on our behalf.  Never forget what Our Divine Saviour has done to save you and to offer you eternal life.  

Please join us for Mass.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located on the Northwest side of Indianapolis.  Marquette Manor is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road.  Mass starts at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  Join us for Mass as we listen to the Word of God and receive the Precious Body and Blood of Our Divine Saviour.  After Mass, we gather for refreshments at the Coffee Hour.  



Special Schedule on Holy Saturday, 2013

On Holy Saturday, St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church will hold a special Lenten Service.  Beginning at 10:00 AM on Holy Saturday, we will have the Rosary and will also have the Stations of the Cross.  Both will be held at the Chapel at Marquette Manor.  Prior to our service, Confessions will be heard beginning at 9:15 AM.  Please makes plans to join us on Holy Saturday. 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, located just South of 86th and Township Line Road (across the street from the St. Vincent's Womens Hospital).



Fourth Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 10th, 2013

In the Gospel from St. John (Chapter 6), we are witness to the feeding of the Five Thousand.  The Apostles wonder aloud how they are going to feed so many people but St. Andrew steps forward and we hear the following:  "One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, saith unto him, There is a lad here, which hath five barley loaves, and two small fishes: but what are they among so many?"  Certainly, the lesson to be learned here is that much can be done sometimes with little.  When faced with great difficulty, oftentimes, we are our own worse enemy.  We look at the obstacles facing us and we give up right away, convincing ourselves that we will not be able to overcome such great difficulties.  But Our Blessed Lord used five loaves and two small fishes as the starting point to feed five thousand and still have twelve baskets left over!  

Join us on Sunday, March 10th, as we continue our journey of Lent.  We will be celebrating the Fourth Sunday of Lent.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis, located just South of 86th and Township Line Road (across the street from the St. Vincent's Womens Hospital).  Please join us as we listen to God's Word; spend time in worship and adoration of Our Blessed Saviour; and receive Him in the Most Blessed Sacrament!  



Third Sunday of Lent, Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

In the Gospel for the Mass of the Third Sunday of Lent, coming to us from the 11th Chapter of St. Luke, we hear the following:  "But he said, Yea rather, blessed are they that hear the word of God, and keep it. "  It is so easy for us to listen to something but not to actually hear what is being said.  There is a difference between "listening" and actually "paying attention."  So, too, in our Christian lives, it is one thing to hear what Our Blessed Lord is saying and it is often a different thing altogether to put what we hear into practice.  We are called to imitate Our Blessed Saviour in how we live our daily lives, no matter how difficult that may be.  

Come join us for Sunday Mass to worship Our Blessed Saviour, to hear His Word, to receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament, and to have fellowship with those who also love Him!  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  Marquette Manor is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  Please feel free to join us any Sunday morning.   We use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the American Missal.



Second Sunday of Lent, Sunday, February 24th, 2013

In the Gospel found in St. Matthew, which is read at the Mass for the Second Sunday of Lent (St. Matthew 15), we hear about the Woman of Canaan who is beseeching Our Blessed Saviour on behalf of her daughter.  Our Lord is impressed with her faith as evidenced in His comment to her:  "O woman, great is thy faith."  We, too, are called to develop our faith as well.  This comes from a life long dedication to staying close to Our Blessed Saviour through prayer; reading and obeying Holy Scripture; and being the instrument of God here on earth.  
Please join us for Mass on Sunday, February 24th, 2013 at St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor.  Marquette Manor is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, IN.  

First Sunday of Lent, Sunday, February 17th, 2013

Join us for Mass on Sunday, February 17th, 2013 at 9:30 AM at St. Margaret Anglican Church as we celebrate the First Sunday of Lent.   As we hear from the Fourth Chapter of St. Matthew's Gospel:  "Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and Him only shalt thou serve."
Come join St. Margaret Parish on Sundays during Lent as we worship Our Blessed Saviour, as we listen to His Word, and as receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament.    Our Blessed Saviour desires our company and our love.  Come spend time with Him during Lent. 
St. Margaret of Scotland Parish worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, IN.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM and we have a Coffee Hour afterward where we join for fellowship.



Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel


“O Glorious Prince of the heavenly host, St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in the battle and in the terrible warfare that we are waging against the principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, against the evil spirits. Come to the aid of man, whom Almighty God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of Satan.

“Fight this day the battle of the Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in Heaven. That cruel, ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold, this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay and cast into eternal perdition souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. This wicked dragon pours out, as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity.

“These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where the See of Holy Peter and the Chair of Truth has been set up as the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety, with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck, the sheep may be.

“Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious power of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly find mercy in the sight of the Lord; and vanquishing the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.
V. Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
R. The Lion of the tribe of Judah has conquered the root of David.
V. Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
R. As we have hoped in Thee.
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto Thee.

Let us pray.
O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy Holy Name, and as supplicants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin Immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious St. Michael the Archangel, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all the other unclean spirits who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of souls. Amen.”


 

Quinquagesima (Sunday Next Before Lent), Sunday, February 10th, 2013

Join us for Mass on Sunday, February 10th, 2013 at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor as we celebrate the Mass for Quinquagesima  or the last Sunday before the beginning of Lent.  

St. Margaret Anglican Church is a member parish of the Anglican Church in America (ACA).  At our parish, you will find traditional worship and liturgy combined with the love of Christ found among our members.  At our parish, we preach the Word of God, which is found in the King James Version of the Bible and we also use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. 

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church, "A Traditional Church for a New Generation!"



Sexagesima (Second Sunday before Lent), Sunday, February 3rd, 2013

In the Epistle for Sexagesima Sunday, St. Paul seems to be boasting about everything that he has done for the Kingdom of God.  But, taken in context, we are quick to realize that St. Paul is actually attributing all of his accomplishments to Almighty God.  This provides each one of us with an excellent opportunity to reflect on the many graces that God has provided to each one of us.  Every single one of us has skills and gifts that we have been given.  It is up to us to acknowledge the source of these gifts . . . . Our Heavenly Father.  

Please consider joining us for Mass this Sunday.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana.    Please join us in worshiping Our Heavenly Father and receiving the Body and Blood of His Blessed Son and asking for the Holy Ghost to come into our hearts!!!

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church, a traditional church for a new generation . . . .



Septuagesima (Third Sunday before Lent), Sunday, January 27th, 2013

"So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen."
So ends the Gospel from the Mass for Septuagesima, the Third Sunday before Lent.  In today's Gospel, we are reminded that God is merciful and shows His mercy to those whom He chooses to show mercy to.  For our part we are called to do what we can to further the Kingdom here on earth.  God has chosen us . . .  God has called us . . . . It is up to us to respond to that call.  

Please join us for Mass.  St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church meets every Sunday morning for Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM


Second Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 20th, 2013

In the epistle from the Mass for the Second Sunday after Epiphany, St. Paul reminds us that each one of us possesses a unique gift that we have been given by the Almighty.  We find the following verse in the twelfth chapter of the Letter to the Romans:  "Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, whether prophecy, let us prophesy according to the proportion of faith; Or ministry, let us wait on our ministering: or he that teacheth, on teaching; Or he that exhorteth, on exhortation: he that giveth, let him do it with simplicity; he that ruleth, with diligence; he that sheweth mercy, with cheerfulness."   Let us then focus on the fact that God has given to each one of us a special and unique gift that only we can use to further the Kingdom of God here on earth.  Our Blessed Saviour chose disciples and apostles to form His Church, and He chooses us as well for what we can offer.  We must make the choice to use our gifts or to ignore His call. 

Please join us for Mass on Sunday, January 20th, 2013 at 9:30 AM.  St. Margaret of Scotland Parish worships at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Please begin your Sunday by joining us for Mass and spending some quality time with God.




First Sunday after Epiphany, Sunday, January 13th, 2013

On Sunday, January 13th, 2013, please plan to visit St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church as we celebrate the First Sunday after Epiphany.  In this Mass, we will hear about the Holy Family losing and then finding the Child Jesus!  Join us as we reflect on the joy in finding Him especially in finding Him in the Blessed Sacrament!  Spend time with us in quality time in the worship of Our Heavenly Father.  St. Margaret gathers together for Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  All all welcome to join us for Mass.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM



Epiphany of Our Lord, Sunday, January 6th, 2013

Please join St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church on Sunday, January 6th, 2013, as we gather together for our first Sunday Mass for 2013.  We will celebrate the Mass for the Epiphany of Our Lord.  Take some time to worship with us and set a new standard for the year 2013.  Let this be the year that you give your heart over to Our Blessed Saviour!  Give your life to Him because He has give His all for you!  Mass begins at 9:30 AM every Sunday morning in the chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from St. Vincent Women's Hospital.



Sunday After Christmas, Sunday, December 30th, 2012

Please join us on Sunday, December 30th, 2012 at 9:30 AM at the Chapel of Marquette Manor as St. Margaret Parish celebrates the Sunday After Christmas.   Take this opportunity to spend time with Our Blessed Lord . . . listen to His Word . . .  receive Him in the Blessed Sacrament . . .  worship with other fellow Christians . . .  set aside an hour for Our Blessed Saviour and worship Him as the Lord and King of your heart!!!  St. Margaret of Scotland worships every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road, on the northwest side of Indianapolis, directly across the street from the St. Vincent Women's Hospital.  Join us as for our traditional worship from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, and as we worship Our Risen Saviour!




Christmas Day, Tuesday, December 25th, 2012

St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church is pleased to announce that we will have Mass on Christmas morning at the Marquette Manor Chapel.  Please join us for Mass on Christmas Day.  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  The Chapel at Marquette Manor is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwestside of Indianapolis.  Please join us for Mass on Christmas Day!

 


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December 23, 2012, Fourth Sunday of Advent

Wanting to wish everyone a very happy Christmas as we approach the end of the Advent Season. On Sunday, December 23, 2012, St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church will celebrate the Fourth Sunday of Advent at the Marquette Manor Chapel, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis. Mass begins at 9:30 AM. Please take this opportunity to spend some quality time with Our Blessed Saviour, to hear His Word preached, and to receive Him in His Precious Body and Blood in preparation for Christmas.





December 16th, 2012, Third Sunday of Advent
Please join St Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church as we celebrate the Third Sunday of Advent on Sunday, December 16th, 2012.  As we move closer and closer to Christmas, let us increase our efforts to prepare a place in our hearts for the Christ Child.  In a world where evil is becoming increasingly more and more commonplace, let us make the extra effort to make Our Blessed Saviour truly the Lord of our lives and the King of our hearts!!!!  Give your hearts to Jesus and let His love shine through you!  
St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican Church celebrates Mass every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM at the Chapel at Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwestside of Indianapolis.







December 9th, 2012, Second Sunday of Advent
Advent continues on Sunday, December 9th, 2012 as St. Margaret of Scotland Anglican parish celebrates the Second Sunday of Advent.   We all have preparations for Christmas . . . . buying presents, wrapping gifts, preparing our Christmas meals, getting ready for Christmas parties, getting out the Christmas cards . . . . but have you prepared a place in your heart for the Divine Infant of Christmas?  Prepare a place for Jesus.  One way to prepare for Christmas is to attend Mass and hear God's Word and receive Him in the Most Blessed Sacrament.  Please join us for Mass, which begins at 9:30 AM on Sunday morning.  We celebrate Mass at the Chapel at Marquette Manor which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road on the Northwest side of Indianapolis





December 2nd, 2012, First Sunday of Advent
"Prepare ye the way of the Lord!"  The holy season of Advent is upon us.  On Sunday, December 2nd, 2012, St. Margaret of Scotland parish will be celebrating the First Sunday of Advent.  While the world is caught up in post-Black Friday sales and getting the best deal of the latest technology, take some time out of your busy schedule and join us for Mass in honour of Our Blessed Saviour.  Spend this Advent season preparing for the coming of the  Christ Child and prepare a place in your hearts for the Child Jesus!  Mass begins at 9:30 AM.  We celebrate Mass in the Chapel of Marquette Manor, which is located at 8140 N. Township Line Road in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Please choose to take some time out of your busy schedule to spend some quality time with God.